There is discrimination and then there are those who refuse to do the job


I do not support discrimination. As an employee I expect to be selected because I have the best skill set for the job. My sex and race should have nothing to do with my selection. There are of course some exceptions to that as if I am pregnant and the job involves working with chemicals a sensible employer would not select me for my protection and would explain that to me. Also if the job was for a male clothes model obviously as a female I am not suited to the position. The same applies to my race. If I am an actor and the role is for an African American I am not suitable for the job obviously.

When it comes to religion the same common sense should apply but unfortunately groups with deep pockets like CAIR have been giving employers a very hard time. Employers should not be punished for expecting their employees to do their job.

If I am hired to lift heavy packages all day I cannot refuse because I am a woman and they are too heavy.If I cannot lift them then I am unsuitable for the job. If I am a Christian and think prostitution is morally wrong then I am obviously not suitable to be a receptionist in a massage parlour. This is clearly common sense yet Muslim employees are taking their employers to court on a regular basis because they don’t want to do aspects of their job or to adhere to work safety standards that are a requirement of the position.

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IRD bribery & fraud scandal: A Special Investigation, Ctd


by Stephen Cook

INLAND REVENUE is officially investigating the actions of those implicated in a messy bribery scandal currently threatening the integrity of the New Zealand taxation system.

Top-level discussions were held in Auckland yesterday between senior IRD investigators and a number of complainants over the alleged criminal conduct of those involved in what appears to be an elaborate plot to defraud taxpayers out of millions of dollars.

But more importantly, at stake is the integrity of the taxation system and the right of all taxpayers to have their liability determined “fairly, impartially and according to law”.

If IRD were to ignore the allegations, it could open itself up to potentially billions of dollars worth of claims from aggrieved taxpayers wanting the same preferential treatment enjoyed by the company at the centre of the latest scandal.

The company had tax liabilities of close to $300,000 but successfully negotiated a final settlement of $30,000 after involving a man who claimed at the time he was a ‘lawyer’ with considerable influence over IRD.  Read more »


Corruption, bribes and two IRD officials – A Special Investigation

by Stephen Cook

CORRUPTION ALLEGATIONS have been levelled against two rogue Inland Revenue staff involved in investigating the tax affairs of an Auckland company at the centre of a messy bribery scandal.

The department is refusing to confirm or deny claims the two forensic investigators were part of an elaborate plot to defraud the taxman out of nearly $200,000.

The bribery allegations form part of the murky backdrop to a complex web of betrayal and deception implicating liquidators, an Auckland lawyer, the two IRD staff along with another man, who for legal reasons cannot be named.

Whaleoil understands complaints have now been filed with the Police, IRD and the Law Society over the actions of various parties involved in the scandal.

An IRD spokesman said due to taxpayer secrecy provisions in the Tax Administration Act it was unable to comment “on matters relating to the tax affairs of individuals, organisations or businesses”.

Even in cases involving Inland Revenue and high-profile customers, the department could not comment on a customer’s affairs, the spokesperson said.

The comments do nothing to shed any light on claims two staff conspired with an Auckland man posing as a lawyer to rip off the tax department to the tune of almost $200,000.    Read more »

PAYE for business, an idea worth exploring

Todd McClay has announced he is looking at the possibility of PAYE for business.

Long awaited tax modernisation proposals were unveiled today by Revenue Minister Todd McClay.

A form of business PAYE, along with greater use of withholding taxes to deal with fringe benefits, interest and other investment income has been flagged.

The government is also looking at reversing the move, made in 1998, to allow most New Zealanders to no longer file tax returns.

[…]    Read more »


Where are the small business owners?

Labour has announced the make up of what they call their “Future of Work Commission“.

Most Kiwis work in small business, or own one. Yet they are not represented in the future of work commission.

Labour’s Finance spokesperson and Chair of the Future of Work Commission Grant Robertson has announced the membership of the External Reference Group which will guide the Commission’s work over the next two years.

“The External Reference Group brings a wide range of knowledge and experience to this important project. We have people from business, union, academic and community backgrounds, all of whom bring specialist skills that will provide expertise to ensure the Commission meets its goals.

“We have deliberately cast a wide net to get people who will challenge us. We want to be clear that each person who has agreed to be on the reference group is doing so because they believe in the importance of the issues the Commission is considering. Their involvement should not be construed as indicating any political preference by them or their organisation.”   Read more »

The problem with ‘ethical investing’

Yet again the Green party is lecturing us on ‘ethical investing’.

Can anyone see a problem with that?

The Green Party has called for the New Zealand Superannuation Fund to quit its investments in companies producing fossil fuel.

The fund’s chief executive, Adrian Orr, said it took the issue of climate change seriously and expected its exposure to fossil fuels to fall over time, and investment in renewables to rise.

“But a simple divestment call? The world is just not that straightforward,” he said.

The fund, set up by the previous Labour Government to partially pre-fund future New Zealand Superannuation payments, had $676 million invested in companies directly involved in fossil fuel production as of last June. That represented about 2 per cent of the fund’s assets.

Greens co-leader Russel Norman, in a paper released yesterday, makes an ethical case for not investing in companies whose activities are literally fuelling potentially catastrophic climate change.

He also points to a financial risk of stranded assets, citing analysis by the International Energy Agency and other bodies that the world’s coal, oil and gas companies already have in their proven reserves at least three times as much carbon as can be burned without exceeding the internationally agreed target of limiting global warming to 2 degrees Celsius.   Read more »

Does Grant Robertson get it?

Grant Robertson, fresh from his second loss in a Labour leadership election has started a “Future of Work” Commission.

As you would expect from a guy who has never worked in the real world, the Commission is talking about stuff that is not really relevant to the massive numbers of self employed and small business owners that make up the bulk of the New Zealand workforce.

Speaking today at the Future of Work Conference at the Auckland University of Technology, Chair of the Commission and Labour Finance spokesperson Grant Robertson outlined the themes and structure of the Commission that will run over the next two years.

“The five work streams are: technology, security of work and income, education and training, Maori and Pasifika, and economic development and sustainability.

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The minority missing in Labour

Labour and Andrew Little have decided to make small business a priority in New Zealand.

Despite signalling in his speech his willingness to assist small businesses, Andrew Little also indicated that he wants to take away workplace flexibility, the single biggest thing that small businesses has been telling Labour in their focus groups.

Small businesses want the 90 day bill to remain, they want flexible tea and meal breaks and they definitely do not want interfering union bosses breathing down their necks.

Perhaps Labour could show they are serious by appealing more another minority group to be added to their caucus representation.

The Labour Party is all about fair representation and all sorts of other bullshit like that.

With the focus now coming on small businesses I want to know when will Labour get small business owners into its caucus.   Read more »

Almost as good as his cat killing policy

Here I was thinking the other day that I don’t agree with Gareth Morgan on anything much at all, except for his cat killing policy.

But I have found another thing to agree with him on.

Flat Tax.

Now that is almost as good as his cat killing policy…it could be improved by providing additional tax rebates for cat killing professionals.


Free trade deal done with South Korea

While the left wing were marching in the streets opposing the TPPA another free trade deal has snuck under their radar.

New Zealand has completed a free trade deal with South Korea.

New Zealand and South Korea have concluded a free-trade agreement that’s expected to cut $230 million of export tariffs in New Zealand’s sixth-largest export market, including $65 million in the first year.

The deal, which was announced on the sidelines of the G20 Leaders’ Summit in Brisbane, will initially eliminate tariffs on 48 percent of current New Zealand exports, with duties largely eliminated within 15 years. Two-way trade between the countries is worth about $4 billion.

South Korea has said it also aims to conclude FTAs with China and Vietnam before the end of the year, after agreeing recent deals with Australia and Canada. New Zealand is actively seeking such agreements after trade with China soared since an FTA was inked in 2008. The Korean FTA marks Prime Minister John Key’s first bilateral deal since being elected leader.

The Korean talks, begun in 2009, have previously stalled amid Korean concern about the impact of New Zealand agricultural exports on domestic producers.

“It has been a long, hard agreement to reach,” Key told reporters in Brisbane. “It’s a high quality deal. It was always going to be a tough negotiation but we have got ourselves now back into a level playing field with those countries that compete heavily in the Korean market and I think a lot of New Zealand industry will be happy about the outcome.”

Tariffs slated for elimination include a 45 percent rate on kiwifruit, 22.5 percent charged on sheep meat, a 40 percent levy on beef and an 89 percent tariff on butter.

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