Cameron Slater

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Apparently, I have encouraged closer scrutiny of local body candidates in Nelson and Marlborough.

A leak to controversial blogger Cameron Slater has sparked interest in who will be Marlborough’s new mayor.

Four well-known local men are putting their hands up to replace outgoing mayor Alistair Sowman, who’s hanging up the chains after 12 years in the job.

This Saturday’s election comes weeks after minutes from a closed door meeting on the future of the controversial new ASB Theatre were leaked the Whale Oil blog.   Read more »

They say Dirty Politics like it is a bad thing

Radio New Zealand is continuing on the witch hunt in Marlborough and Nelson. Instead of focussing on the issues they want to shoot the messenger and root out a whistle-blower.

Nelson councillor and mayoral candidate Pete Rainey said it amounted to gutter politics, which was unbelievable in local body elections.

The blog run by Cameron Slater was described in Nicky Hager’s book Dirty Politics, as having a history of running smear campaigns against MPs, health campaigners, environmentalists and others on behalf of Mr Slater’s political allies.

Mr Rainey, a city councillor for three terms, and co-owner of a local events management business, was recently accused of profiteering from his dealings with the council. He said the deputy mayor Paul Matheson asked for information on his business dealings with council, but Mr Rainey said it was later found to be wrong.

Whale Oil published the information.

“Look there’s definitely untrue claims made by Slater about a company I own and its dealing with the council. The information is incorrect – it’s quite clear it’s incorrect but the information is out in the public arena and I think the people of Nelson will have to make their own mind up about how that happened and who stood to gain from it,” Mr Rainey said.

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Creative Colin exposed in Mr X fiasco

As I wrote earlier, yesterday in court was excruciating.

Yvonne Tahana from TVNZ gets right to the bottom of the Mr X fiasco.

Mr McKnight was blunt to Mr Craig about the pamphlet which took a question and answer form with himself: “This is you just making something up?”

“I’ve based it on conversations and thoughts of other people,” Craig answered.

Mr McKnight is working systematically through major sentences in the pamphlet.

He asked Craig to read where Mr X denies any sexual harassment against Craig’s former press secretary Rachel MacGregor and a “second victim”.

The line was “I don’t see why that matters … just that it gets reported [laughs].”   Read more »

From despicable, to evil genius, to master of political games…all in a day

Yesterday I was described as despicable by ratbags in Marlborough who have come under some much-needed scrutiny.

And Colin Craig called me an evil genius and a master of political games under cross-examination.

The cross-examination of Craig was awful in its entirety as his words were picked over bit by bit. From the love letters to the booklet, every phrase was read out by Craig and he was asked what he meant by the sentence.

No journalist managed to capture the sheer embarrassment of it all. You had to be there.

Adam Hollingworth has some of it.

Jordan Williams’ lawyer has gone on the attack in cross-examining Colin Craig, at the defamation trial against the former Conservative Party leader.

Peter McKnight questioned Mr Craig in depth on Monday morning about his decision to use the literary device ‘Mr X’ in pamphlets he sent to hundreds of thousands of households last year.

Mr Williams took the defamation case against Mr Craig after the latter called him a liar for spreading “false allegations” about him to other members of the Conservative Party, particularly regarding his behaviour around former press secretary Rachel MacGregor.

On Monday, Mr Craig told the jury ‘Mr X’was a nom de plume in his Dirty Politics leaflet at the centre of the defamation trial.

But Mr McKnight suggested that was dishonest.   Read more »

Why attempts to silence Whaleoil will always have the opposite effect

It is an open secret that Whaleoil’s readership increased substantially when The Dirty Politics Hack was revealed. Not only did it increase our readership at the time the news hit, we also retained most of the people who came to see what the fuss was about. The hack and the book were designed to cause such carnage that Whaleoil would be forced to shut down. Failing to win the contest of ideas on the internet, certain individuals on the left instead conspired to silence the opposing voice by breaking the law.

Now we have three academics who want to do a Colin Craig and try to intimidate us with money and lawyers in order to silence Whaleoil by financially crippling us. These academics chose to enter the robust arena of politics and didn’t like it when the opposition body slammed them into the canvas. Their  intention is to use their defamation case to create a “chilling effect” on political discourse. They don’t want “toxic bloggers” and private businesses to have the freedom to criticise their views and opinions.

Incomprehensibly, these same individuals consider it their right to attack private companies and hurt their businesses while they are being paid by the taxpayer. They are allowed to lobby while paid by the government yet want to deny the exact same right to businesses and individuals wanting to lobby the public themselves. Their actions are a clear attack on free speech that will have serious repercussions for every New Zealand blog and media outlet if they succeed.

Thankfully, in both the case of the hack and the court case started by the three troughkerteers, these actions will have the opposite effect to what they intended. An article written at Harvard explains why.

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Media Statement from Cameron Slater on Benjamin Rachinger and the hack of The Standard that never actually happened

Media Statement from Cameron Slater on Benjamin Rachinger and the hack of The Standard that never actually happened.

A lot of time has passed since the criminal hacker took the bulk of my emails and Facebook chats as part of a planned conspiracy against the Right.  And a significant amount of time has passed since my last public statement about Ben Rachinger and the alleged hacking into The Standard blog.  

A lot has happened. A lot continues to happen. And my approach has been to say almost nothing to stop it getting in the way of several police complaints, active investigations and court cases I am directly or peripherally involved in. Mostly as the complainant, I’d like to add.

All of this is connected to Kim Dotcom, to the NZ Police, to the NZ Herald, TV3, Colin Craig and several people I can still not name due to other court commitments.  But the Ben Rachinger “The Standard hack” issue has now resolved itself to the point where it can be talked about with some degree of isolation without getting in the way of the other issues before the authorities.

Today, with the lifting of the Police-requested and Court-ordered suppression, I am taking the opportunity to do two things. 

I’m going to make a number of factual statements today in this release, and I am going to write a number of articles that will delve into some of the detail of what has developed.  The first will be published on later today. Read more »

OMSA rejects 4 out of 5 complaints from Penny Bright

Penny Bright got upset about my posts about her water meter and instead of contacting me directly went and complained to OMSA. She used every category to complain but OMSA rejected 4 out of 5 of her complaints.

Content: “Can Penny Bright Explain This?”

Publisher: Whale Oil Beef Hooked

Complainant: P. Bright

Click here to view full Decision

The complaint was by and about Penny Bright, a 2016 Auckland City Mayoral candidate and the use of a Watercare water meter at her property in Auckland.

The content was headed “Can Penny Bright Explain This?” and was written by Cameron Slater.  It made statements about Ms Bright and recent Court action about outstanding rates.  It included photographs of Ms Bright’s property and water meter with statements and questions about whether Ms Bright had done something to bypass the property’s water meter.   Read more »

Shock for Andrew Little in latest INCITE|Curia poll


In our latest edition of INCITE: Politics which will be released today there is a catastrophic result for Andrew Little in our monthly INCITE|Curia polling.

Exclusive to us Curia looks again at how New Zealanders think our political leaders are doing. This is the only public poll in New Zealand that reports on approval of party leaders.

We asked 1,000 New Zealanders “Do you approve or disapprove of the way John Key/Andrew Little is handling his job as Prime Minister/Leader of the Opposition?”

And the results are devastating. Andrew Little has slumped 12 points while John Key has increased slightly by 1%.

It is clear that last months results were a ‘dead cat’ bounce and Andrew Little is now back under the pump for his lack of performance.

Full details are only available to subscribers.   Read more »

The ends justifies the means for the left-wing

The left-wing are all over the “Panama Papers”, like white on rice.

They were all over Nicky Hager’s illegal use of my private correspondence.

Both cases involved criminal hackers illegally obtaining private documentation and then shopping that to left-wing activists who laundered the documents, published them and claimed public interest…all as a result of a crime.

But dial back on the personalities and the politics and put what has happened in a different context.

Let’s say a group of criminal defense lawyers kept a database of their confidential conversations with their clients.  That would include clients charged with murder, robbery, DUI, drug abuse, and so on.  In turn, a hacker would break into that database and post the information from those conversations on Wikileaks.  Of course a lot of those conversations would appear to be incriminating because — let’s face it — most of the people who require defense attorneys on criminal charges are in fact guilty.  When asked why the hack was committed, the hacker would say “Most of those people are guilty.  I want to make sure they do not escape punishment.”

How many of us would approve of that behavior?  Keep in mind the hacker is spreading the information not only to prosecutors but to the entire world, and outside of any process sanctioned by the rule of law.  The hacker is not backed by the serving of any criminal charges or judge-served warrants.

Yet somehow many of us approve when the victims are wealthy and higher status, as is the case with the Panama Papers.  Furthermore most of those individuals probably did nothing illegal, but rather they were trying to minimize their tax burden through (mostly) legal shell corporations.  Admittedly, very often the underlying tax laws should be changed, just as we should repeal the deduction for mortgage interest too.  But in the meantime we are not justified in stealing information about those people, even if some of them are evil and powerful, as is indeed the case for homeowners too.

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Crazy Colin rides again


Colin Craig really doesn’t like having the truth told about him. He has decided to sue me for publishing an excerpt of his poemThe Two of Me” that he sent to Rachel MacGregor.

Colin Craig has tabled legal papers seeking more than $13,000 from blogger Cameron Slater for publishing the former politician’s romantic poetry on his blog.

Craig, who identifies himself as a secret songwriter, poet and fiction author, says he wants to set the record straight after suffering humiliation when his poem The Two Of Me was published on the Whaleoil site last year.

In a statement of claim provided by Slater, the former Conservative Party leader states only two copies existed of the poem. One Craig kept stored in his “personal literary archive”, the other was owned by his former press secretary, Rachel MacGregor.

Jordan Williams, the executive director of the Taxpayers Union, is named as a second defendant.

“Mr Craig has elected to forego publishing his creative writing for consumption by the public in order to, amongst other reasons, preserve his privacy,” the document states.

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