Canada

Time for a recall option

The Taxpayers’ Union has called for the implementation of a recall option for local body politics.

The Taxpayers’ Union is calling on the Government to give local communities the ability to petition for recall elections, after Len Brown’s latest snub to ratepayers has hit the headlines. The Herald on Sunday is reporting that Len Brown has had a private bathroom and dressing room installed behind a bookshelf in the Mayor’s office. The secret rooms have cost ratepayers $30,000.

The Union’s Executive Director, Jordan Williams, says:

“A secret dressing room, complete with a two seater couch, is a luxury lair, not value for money for ratepayers.”

“Councillors have already censured Len Brown for misusing funds but clearly the line in the sand is being ignored. Mr Brown’s refusal to talk to media says a lot about his respect for ratepayers and his fellow councillors.”

“It’s time the Government gave ratepayers a voice between elections. A recall option would enable ratepayers to petition for a vote to fire a shameless politicians who lacks any respect for those who pay the bills.”

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Step 1: Chemical weapons captured Step 2: MIG fighters Step 3: Chemical weapons used

…or so it is claimed.

The play to get the world behind boots on the ground action is marching on.

Dizzy, vomiting and struggling to breathe, 11 Iraqi police officers were rushed to a government hospital 80km north of the capital last month. The diagnosis: poisoning by chlorine gas. The perpetrators, according to the officers: Islamic State extremists.

The chlorine attack appears to be the first confirmed use of chemical weapons by the Islamic State on the battlefield. An Iraqi Defence Ministry official corroborated it, and doctors said survivors’ symptoms were consistent with chlorine poisoning.

I love the “appears to be” leading to the use of “confirmed”.  It’s skillful, no?

It is one of three crude chlorine attacks that Iraqi forces say have occurred since the extremists seized vast tracts of Iraqi territory this summer, although details on the other two incidents remain sketchy. The reported assaults raise concerns that the militants are attempting to hone their chemical weapons capabilities as they push to seize more ground.

Say to  have occurred.   Read more »

NZ Parliament changes security in response to Canada shooting

qwwq

Hey, I thought we weren’t living in a strategically hostile environment?

Perhaps we just need to have Russel Norman and his acolytes stand guard at all parliamentary access points?   Read more »

On the Canadian parliament shooting

Photo: Postmedia / Barcroft Media

Photo: Postmedia / Barcroft Media

I’m holding off with the rhetoric and theories until a little more is known.

It’s not clear who is responsible for today’s shooting but the shocking scenes in Ottawa come two days after a 25-year-old convert to radical Islam ran down two Canadian soldiers, killing one. The driver, Martin Couture-Rouleau, was shot and killed by police.

David Lawler has a little more detail: Read more »

The land of the free?

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First they came for our dogs and I said nothing because I didn’t have a dog.
Then they came for our cats and I said nothing because I didn’t like cats.
Then they came for our education system and I said nothing because I didn’t have children.
Then they imposed Sharia Law and I said nothing because I was a woman and my place was under a Burqa.

 

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Native advertising? Yep

Read this article in the NZ Herald from yesterday…it makes you wonder how this is even news.

Canadian migrant Genevieve Westcott remembers the 20.5 per cent mortgage rates of the 1980s.

“When we first came to New Zealand in the mid-80s, we had planned to stay for just a year to sample the Antipodean delights. We had left behind a beautiful house in Vancouver. We were horrified at the mortgage rates in God’s Own. In 1987, when I was headhunted back to Canada, the mortgage rate had peaked at 20.5 per cent compared to Canada where the rate was 9.75 per cent for a one-year fixed mortgage. We didn’t waste any time buying a new home in Toronto,” the broadcast journalist remembers.

But by 1991, she had returned here, buying a sprawling villa in Devonport’s Summer St where she lived for 17 happy years.

“Our mortgage rate then, as I recall, was about 14.5 per cent. Luckily we brought Canadian funds with us from the sale of a Toronto home to bolster our purchase. But we still had to go to the bank and it took us a few years to pay off the mortgage. We had quite a party to celebrate when the momentous day arrived.

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Comment of the Day

From the post about ISIS, Olivia Pierson writes:

I’m so glad you put this up Cameron. I have to say I felt a twinge of disgust when I read Andrea Vance’s op-ed; again with the staggeringly militant ignorance of NZ journalism on geopolitical issues which deeply matter!

Firstly – Vance says; “In the last two decades, Iraq has not been far off the military radar.

Military intervention to eliminate weapons of mass destruction was built on a fallacy, years of slaughter failed to remove the threat of terrorism or install democracy.”

The removal of the psychopathic Saddam Hussein Baathist regime was inevitable and appallingly long-overdue, a reality which Tony Blair knew along with President Bush – hence the Anglo-American coalition to overthrow it. The questions around WMD was only ONE of the reasons which put this coalition on the right side of history.

According to the United Nations, there are four egregious acts where breaking even one of them, can and should result in regime change; Saddam broke all four:
1 – committing genocide (against the Kurds),
2 – the invasion of a neighbouring state (Iran & Kuwait),
3 – proliferating nuclear weapons (Saddam himself boasted that Iraq was on its way to acquiring a centrifuge (we now know he only had a blueprint) and remember the 550 metric tons of yellow cake airlifted out of Iraq and shipped straight to Canada in 2008? Should the world have just taken a violent psychopath’s word that the enriched uranium was intended for peaceful purposes only?)
4 – aiding and abetting terrorism (Saddam was a renowned and prolific supporter of terrorism to many Islamist militant organisations, among them Abu Musab al-Zarqawi, head of Al-Qaeda in Iraq, who moved freely between Afghanistan, Syria, Jordan and Iraq – a fact which obviates Saddam’s blessing.) Read more »

Global warming coming to Canada

After the Arctic was once agin not ice free this summer, despite being 3 years overdue from being free from ice forever, the Canadians are set to enjoy some real global warming.

Brace yourself: the Old Farmer’s Almanac has revealed its predictions for Canada’s upcoming winter season, and it’s not great news.

After last winter’s seemingly never-ending wickedly cold weather, residents in much of the country can expect more of the same in the coming months.

“We’re looking at the T-Rex of winters,” Jack Burnett, editor of the Old Farmer’s Almanac, said on CTV’s Canada AM on Thursday.

“It’s going to be colder, it’s going to be snowier … it’s not pretty.”

According to the almanac, central Canada, in particular, is expected to experience winter’s nasty bite.

“From Calgary to Quebec, we’re going to be up to our neck,” Burnett said.

One of the few exceptions will be southwestern Ontario, which will be cold, but with below-normal snowfall.

Burnett said forecasts show that while Toronto and the surrounding region will experience a deep-freeze, it’s going to be drier this winter, with “fluffier snow.”

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Reading Whaleoil will make you stupid

Guess what?  More university ‘research’

Reading online could be making us dumber, a [Candian] University of Victoria study has found.

The study of offline and online reading behaviour found spending hours glued to a computer screen had a negative impact on cognition, concentration, comprehension, absorption and recall rates.

People were reading more text than ever, but retaining less of it.

Victoria’s School of Information Management’s Dr Val Hooper said people today almost expected to be interrupted when using their computers.

“Multitasking when reading online was common, with activities such as reading emails, checking news, exploring hyperlinks and viewing video clips providing distractions, which could have something to do with it.”

While readers were churning through more content online, they were much more likely to be skim reading and scanning than absorbing anything of substance.

“Many respondents said they had learnt to read faster and more selectively, which is positive, but also said they were more likely to remember material they had read offline. It was still common practice for many people to print out material they considered most important,” Dr Hooper said.

I love the fact that 1) research was done, and 2) the best they can come up with is that it could make us dumber.  Seriously, the trough at the Uni of Victoria must still be well filled.  Did we actually learn anything useful?   Read more »

Photo Of The Day

Terry Fox

Terry Fox

Inspirational

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