Canada

Native advertising? Yep

Read this article in the NZ Herald from yesterday…it makes you wonder how this is even news.

Canadian migrant Genevieve Westcott remembers the 20.5 per cent mortgage rates of the 1980s.

“When we first came to New Zealand in the mid-80s, we had planned to stay for just a year to sample the Antipodean delights. We had left behind a beautiful house in Vancouver. We were horrified at the mortgage rates in God’s Own. In 1987, when I was headhunted back to Canada, the mortgage rate had peaked at 20.5 per cent compared to Canada where the rate was 9.75 per cent for a one-year fixed mortgage. We didn’t waste any time buying a new home in Toronto,” the broadcast journalist remembers.

But by 1991, she had returned here, buying a sprawling villa in Devonport’s Summer St where she lived for 17 happy years.

“Our mortgage rate then, as I recall, was about 14.5 per cent. Luckily we brought Canadian funds with us from the sale of a Toronto home to bolster our purchase. But we still had to go to the bank and it took us a few years to pay off the mortgage. We had quite a party to celebrate when the momentous day arrived.

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Comment of the Day

From the post about ISIS, Olivia Pierson writes:

I’m so glad you put this up Cameron. I have to say I felt a twinge of disgust when I read Andrea Vance’s op-ed; again with the staggeringly militant ignorance of NZ journalism on geopolitical issues which deeply matter!

Firstly – Vance says; “In the last two decades, Iraq has not been far off the military radar.

Military intervention to eliminate weapons of mass destruction was built on a fallacy, years of slaughter failed to remove the threat of terrorism or install democracy.”

The removal of the psychopathic Saddam Hussein Baathist regime was inevitable and appallingly long-overdue, a reality which Tony Blair knew along with President Bush – hence the Anglo-American coalition to overthrow it. The questions around WMD was only ONE of the reasons which put this coalition on the right side of history.

According to the United Nations, there are four egregious acts where breaking even one of them, can and should result in regime change; Saddam broke all four:
1 – committing genocide (against the Kurds),
2 – the invasion of a neighbouring state (Iran & Kuwait),
3 – proliferating nuclear weapons (Saddam himself boasted that Iraq was on its way to acquiring a centrifuge (we now know he only had a blueprint) and remember the 550 metric tons of yellow cake airlifted out of Iraq and shipped straight to Canada in 2008? Should the world have just taken a violent psychopath’s word that the enriched uranium was intended for peaceful purposes only?)
4 – aiding and abetting terrorism (Saddam was a renowned and prolific supporter of terrorism to many Islamist militant organisations, among them Abu Musab al-Zarqawi, head of Al-Qaeda in Iraq, who moved freely between Afghanistan, Syria, Jordan and Iraq – a fact which obviates Saddam’s blessing.) Read more »

Global warming coming to Canada

After the Arctic was once agin not ice free this summer, despite being 3 years overdue from being free from ice forever, the Canadians are set to enjoy some real global warming.

Brace yourself: the Old Farmer’s Almanac has revealed its predictions for Canada’s upcoming winter season, and it’s not great news.

After last winter’s seemingly never-ending wickedly cold weather, residents in much of the country can expect more of the same in the coming months.

“We’re looking at the T-Rex of winters,” Jack Burnett, editor of the Old Farmer’s Almanac, said on CTV’s Canada AM on Thursday.

“It’s going to be colder, it’s going to be snowier … it’s not pretty.”

According to the almanac, central Canada, in particular, is expected to experience winter’s nasty bite.

“From Calgary to Quebec, we’re going to be up to our neck,” Burnett said.

One of the few exceptions will be southwestern Ontario, which will be cold, but with below-normal snowfall.

Burnett said forecasts show that while Toronto and the surrounding region will experience a deep-freeze, it’s going to be drier this winter, with “fluffier snow.”

Read more »

Reading Whaleoil will make you stupid

Guess what?  More university ‘research’

Reading online could be making us dumber, a [Candian] University of Victoria study has found.

The study of offline and online reading behaviour found spending hours glued to a computer screen had a negative impact on cognition, concentration, comprehension, absorption and recall rates.

People were reading more text than ever, but retaining less of it.

Victoria’s School of Information Management’s Dr Val Hooper said people today almost expected to be interrupted when using their computers.

“Multitasking when reading online was common, with activities such as reading emails, checking news, exploring hyperlinks and viewing video clips providing distractions, which could have something to do with it.”

While readers were churning through more content online, they were much more likely to be skim reading and scanning than absorbing anything of substance.

“Many respondents said they had learnt to read faster and more selectively, which is positive, but also said they were more likely to remember material they had read offline. It was still common practice for many people to print out material they considered most important,” Dr Hooper said.

I love the fact that 1) research was done, and 2) the best they can come up with is that it could make us dumber.  Seriously, the trough at the Uni of Victoria must still be well filled.  Did we actually learn anything useful?   Read more »

Photo Of The Day

Terry Fox

Terry Fox

Inspirational

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Photo Of The Day

Photo: The Canadian Press/Andrew Vaughan K9 dog Danny, sniffs the Stetson of his partner, slain Constable David Ross, during the funeral procession for three RCMP officers who were killed on duty.

Photo: The Canadian Press/Andrew Vaughan
K9 dog Danny, sniffs the Stetson of his partner, slain Constable David Ross, during the funeral procession for three RCMP officers who were killed on duty.

Fallen Mountie Dave Ross’ Dog Danny Says Final Goodbye

 

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Cannabis going corporate?

Marijuana plants grow under artificial sunlight in one of the many climate-controlled rooms at Tweed Marijuana in Smiths Falls, Ontario. Tweed is one of about 20 companies that are licensed to grow medical marijuana in Canada. Credit Dave Chan for The New York Times

Marijuana plants grow under artificial sunlight in one of the many climate-controlled rooms at Tweed Marijuana in Smiths Falls, Ontario. Tweed is one of about 20 companies that are licensed to grow medical marijuana in Canada. Credit Dave Chan for The New York Times

With expanding legalisation in the US it appears that cannabis is going corporate.

That is certainly the case in Canada.

How long before we hear the term “Big Weed”?

Hershey stopped producing chocolate in Smiths Falls, Ontario, six years ago. The work went to Mexico, but the factory remains, along with reminders of the glory days: A sign that once directed school buses delivering children for tours. A fading, theme-park-style entrance that marks what used to be the big attraction — a “Chocolate Shoppe” that sold about $4 million of broken candy and bulk bars a year.

The once ever-present sweet smell of chocolate is gone, too. In the high-ceilinged warehouse, where stacks of Hershey’s bars and Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups once awaited shipment, the nose now picks up a different odor: the woody, herbal aroma of 50,000 marijuana plants.

Clinical, climate-controlled rooms with artificial sunlight house rows upon rows of plants at various stages of growth. In the “mother room,” horticulturalists use cuttings to start new plants. The “flowering rooms” are flooded with intense light 12 hours a day to nurture nearly grown plants in strains with vaguely aristocratic names like Argyle, Houndstooth and Twilling.   Read more »

Tagged:

Dressed in black, bloated with gas & stinks

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Did Kim Dotcom die and wash ashore in Canada?

But I digress. Actually three rotting whale carcasses need disposing of and the Canadians are stuck in a bit of a conundrum as to how to get rid of them.

One man’s trash may be another man’s treasure, but a community leader says the hassle of dealing with rotting blue whales on Newfoundland’s west coast is a bigger problem than people may realize.

Two blue whale carcasses washed ashore on the coast of Rocky Harbour and Trout River, both located near Gros Morne National Park. A sperm whale carcass also washed ashore in the Cape St. George area.

The animals died after getting caught in severe ice conditions off the island’s coast this winter.

Maurice Budgell, chair of the King’s Point Heritage Society, which operates the town’s Whale Pavilion, said when his community took on the task of getting the flesh off a humpback whale carcass, it was a bigger job than anyone bargained for, and they’re not interested in doing it again.

“With all of the problems that we had with the one that we have here now, it would be a monstrous job to take on something else like that,” said Budgell.   Read more »

Map of the Day

No One Lives here - Canada

 

No one lives here, Canada. Green indicates no recorded population.

I have found the new leader of the Labour Party