Charter school

Charter School investigation: Vanguard Military School Part One

In my new series investigating Vanguard Military School I once again ask the questions and report back the answers without spin. Today’s article is based on my interview with Vanguard chief executive, Nick Hyde.

Vanguard Military school's impressive NCEA results were not included in newspaper article. PHOTO-Whaleoil.co.nz

Vanguard Military School chief executive Nick Hyde pointing out that Vanguard Military school’s NCEA results were not included in The Herald newspaper article.
PHOTO-Whaleoil.co.nz

Within ten minutes of arriving at Vanguard I had been told the bad news and the good news.

The bad news:

The day before my interview with Nick, The Herald published Auckland schools’ NCEA results and left  Vanguard Military school off the table. Vanguard was the only school out of the approximately 80 schools in Auckland that was left off.

The good news:

Vanguard achieved a 96.2% pass rate at NCEA Level 1 and a 100% pass rate at NCEA Level 2.

Both these results are well above the average for secondary schools across the country and a result like that after only one year of operation is unarguably newsworthy. When the omission was brought to The Herald’s attention they told Nick that it was because they hadn’t been provided with a full set of data. Vanguard confirmed that NZQA who hold all the results had sent them to the Herald. The Herald then updated the table on line to include Vanguard’s results. It was of course far too late for the paper version which had omitted Vanguard’s results from its table.”

Our results put us at 11th in Auckland at level one and 1st equal at level 2. Many people out there in the public domain would have been very keen on seeing our school measured against other schools. I have harped on about trying to make Vanguard a top ten school in Auckland over a five year period. To be 11th after the first year in one area and first equal in another is totally outstanding.

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PPTA President Loves Education that brings Systemic Failure of the Poor

Angela-Roberts

In a “my job is tough please cry me a river” article PPTA President Angela Roberts closes by stating:

Public education is important for a nation. We have a great system in New Zealand and these challenges come about so we can improve our great curriculum.

So she is happy with:

– many decile 1 & 2 schools getting Year 13 UE pass rates of less than 20% while decile 9 & 10 are almost uniformly above 60%.

– ongoing gaps for Maori and Pasifika compared to the rest of the New Zealand population.   Read more »

DIrty Media – NZ Herald manipulates letter from David Seymour

The NZ Herald has been playing dirty media again, this time manipulating a letter from David Seymour challenging their hit piece on Charter Schools.

Seymour is not one to back down and has published an image showing the blatant manipulations by the NZ Herald.

dirty-media-nzherlad Read more »

PPTA will be outraged over this!

The government is spending $298 million on four new schools via a PPP (i.e. a private company is making a profit).

Education Minister Hekia Parata last week signed the $298 million contract with the Future Schools Partners (FSP) consortium to finance, design, construct, and maintain Ormiston Junior College in Auckland, Aranui Community Campus and Rolleston Secondary School in Canterbury and Wakatipu High School in Queenstown.

Eventually this will cover 6000 students and the set up cost equates to $9.83 million per 200 children.

Charter Schools are all charitable and their set-up equates to $1.12 million per 200 children.    Read more »

PPTA President’s School Highly Funded Compared to Charters

In Saturday’s NZ Herald PPTA President Angela Roberts declared a “broken heart” and “hurt” over a Northland Charter School buying a waka.

This is in keeping with her attempt to protect the PPTA patch against the perceived threat of nine marauding Charter Schools.

She is trying to create the impression that Charter Schools are over-funded. In her PPTA profile Roberts declares herself a teacher of Drama and Economics at Stratford High School.

This school is long established and yet has funding of $8,865.20 per student (over $4.7 million in total – excluding buildings and centralised services).

Four of the nine Charters have got their per student costs below that level already – well within the first two years of their existence. For those schools their annual building costs are included in that figure and well as cashed-up funding for centralised services they don’t receive.   Read more »

What should break the heart of a PPTA President

In Saturday’s NZ Herald PPTA President Angela Roberts announced that a Charter School spending less than her annual salary (and funded from a variety of sources) to buy a Waka for their children to use “breaks my heart” and “hurts”.

What should really break the heart of a PPTA President?

Shouldn’t it be massively funded PPTA staffed schools achieving atrocious results for children that lock them into unemployment and negative social cycles. Shouldn’t it be the huge set of negative differentials in New Zealand for Maori and Pasifika students?

No doubt people are trying hard in these schools but the results should be breaking Roberts’ heart. Here a few examples from State Schools where children need help:

Tamaki College gets $6 million per year (exclusive of buildings and centralised services) but only 44% of their Year 11s get NCEA Level 1 and only 11% of their Year 13s get UE.    Read more »

How Charter Schools do superbly pushing it up hill (with the proverbial rake)

As outlined here Charter Schools have to start on a fraction of a state school funds. They start on approximately $1million set up per 200 students whereas State schools start on up to 5 times that amount per student.

Another huge money State School is making progress towards starting – this time in Hamilton for $40 million dollars.

So…..of the reasons not to start Charter Schools (according to the Left):

– They are expensive. Well clearly they are not.

– The are a failed model overseas. Stanford University says the are fabulous for needy children.   Read more »

Why we need more Charter Schools here

New Orleans has had what amounts to a learning revolution for the children there. The sort of revolution many schools need here.

In the decade since then, things have really turned around.  Most students are black (90 percent) and low-income (80 percent). The quality of graduation rates have dramatically improved from 54 percent in 2004 to 80 percent today, as well as gains in math and reading. Why? Because it’s not about the schools, it’s about the kids.

Local autonomy is the key to the success of charter schools. Roemer Shirley emphasized the importance of “making decisions as close to kids as possible,” rather than leaving decisions up to distant bureaucrats: “When we empower parents and teachers, we can create a better outcome.” This means fighting the status quo “every day to continue to innovate.”

Read more »

Even the Australian media publish the good Charter School news

The left-wing media and their pals in parliament constantly harp on about charter schools on behalf of their union buddies.

They are patch protecting and can produce no real evidence to support their claims.

On the other side of the argument, though, there is building evidence that should start to hush them up.

The problem is in getting that information out there through the filters of the media…like the new Stanford University study of charter schools that even Australian media has highlighted but remains untouched by NZ media.

Stanford University’s Center for Research on Education Outcomes (CREDO) has a new study out finding urban charter schools outperform traditional public schools (TPS) in urban areas.

The results are the latest in mounting evidence that many charter schools provide tremendous benefit to students — particularly those located in urban areas.

“The charter school sector has gotten to a point of maturity where it’s dominated by established charters that have stood the test of time and are operating a lot more efficiently and effectively for kids, and so we’re starting to see now this general positive impact of charters on student achievement,” Patrick Wolf, PH.D., a distinguished professor in the Department of Education Reform at the University of Arkansas, told Business Insider.

The study looked at 41 urban areas in 22 states. Here’s what it found:     Read more »

State School Cost vs Charter School Cost

The PPTA/NZEI/Labour and their apologists continue to try and promote the myth that Charter Schools are over funded.

While some good results are coming here and brilliant results for urban Charters in the USA it is worth thinking of comparative costs.

A Charter school in NZ costs approximately $1 million to set up.

As a recent State example Ormiston Senior College cost $50 million and currently are spreading that over only 400 students while getting nearly $8,400 per student per annum too.

Ormiston Senior College is a decile 10, Co-Educational Secondary school, located in Auckland. The school has 396 Year 11-15 students including 8international students. The school receives $3,313,403.55 in direct government funding, which translates to a budget of $8,367.18 per student.

Read more »