Chester Borrows

Another Cunliffe cockup

incomptent

David Cunliffe reputation for telling the truth took a battering over his dodgy CV, then his secret trusts and on top of that almost every announcement he has made on policy or comments on government policy has contains mis-truths, deception or lies.

Yesterday was no different when he accused the government of going soft on tax dodgers while at the same time creating the impression that Labour like to hug beneficiaries.

Chester Borrows was quick to kick him in the slats.

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Another Cunliffe balls up

David Cunliffe has developed a truthiness problem.

He told Gordon Campbell in an interview:

We’ve got ten minutes. I haven’t asked about your welfare policy, so I’ll make it specific. We all oppose fraud. Does Labour oppose the government’s new welfare fraud policy whereby the partners of welfare fraudsters will be criminally liable for the fraud, and for the repayment of the entire amount – and not simply for the amount from which they might have indirectly benefitted. If re-elected will Labour retain this provision or scrap it ?

Scrap it.

Later in the day Labour voted to support the legislation. Chester Borrows has issued a press release that says:

Associate Social Development Minister Chester Borrows says Labour needs to be clear on where they stand on welfare fraud.  Read more »

Corrupt Labour candidate to be stripped of JP status

daljitsingh

Chester Borrows has recommended that corrupt Labour candidate Daljit Singh be stripped of his JP status.

His press release states:

Associate Justice Minister Chester Borrows has today indicated that he will be recommending that the Governor General remove Justice of the Peace Daljit Singh from office, following his conviction in the Auckland High Court for electoral fraud.  Read more »

Chester Borrows finally finds his balls

Nah, not really. It’s just the usual election year cynical tune-up of being “tough on crime”

The tens of thousands of Kiwis who have failed to pay traffic fines could be banned from driving under strict measures announced by the Government today.

Around 136,000 New Zealanders owe a total of $48 million in traffic-related fines and the Government says many are making no effort to pay.

Courts Minister Chester Borrows will announce today that from February 17 those drivers could be issued with a Driver Licence Stop Order, which would prevent them from driving and could see cars seized for 28 days.

“A lot of [fine dodgers] have chosen to ignore repeated reminders and if they remain unco-operative they’ll pay for it with their driver licence.”

Borrows said the initial focus would be on the worst offenders but it was a warning to all those who owed money to get it paid quickly.

You know what’s going to happen, don’t you?  The worst offenders will still be driving around, but Erica who has a $30 parking fine outstanding will have the family car taken away Sunday night so she can’t get the kids to school the next morning.   Read more »

Bomb Detection skilz in Wanganui

Our roving reporter, Pete, is currently in Wanganui. There is a Telecom wireless hotspot right outside Chester Borrows office…so he is catching up on his chores.

Is it a bomb or a rubbish bag?

Is it a bomb or a rubbish bag?

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Speaking of data and privacy concerns…

The Herald, no less, seems to think it important enough to report the concerns people have with Government access to private data

New powers for the Ministry of Social Development which would allow officials to secretly approach beneficiaries’ banks or workplaces if they suspected them of committing welfare fraud have been questioned by women’s groups.

As part of reforms to recoup $20 million in relationship fraud each year, ministry staff would not have to inform a beneficiary if they were investigating whether they were wrongly claiming welfare.

Of course we need some decent rules, guidelines and penalties for breaches of privacy.

But we also need to let the Government do its job, especially in identifying those that are stealing from the tax payer.   Read more »

Cracking down on Welfare cheats

The government new measures to crackdown on welfare cheats take effect tomorrow.

New measures to crack down on beneficiaries who have previously cheated the system will begin tomorrow.

The ‘low trust client’ rules are aimed at preventing those with a history of benefit fraud from repeating the abuse.

It will apply to people who have been convicted of welfare fraud in the past or had overpayments established following a fraud investigation.  Read more »

Chester goes soft on crims

Shall we have a sweepstake on when the first big punch up takes place before parties …NBR explains (paid content):

Criminal re-offending may be linked to where bad guys sit in court.

And in what has been described by one senior lawyer as “The Inmates are Running the Asylum”, the justice ministry is about to test the theory at North Shore district court.

From early next year defendants – who traditionally stand in the dock at the side of the courtroom – will move to the front of the court alongside their lawyer.

The theory is that defendants standing in the dock at the side of the court do not “engage” with the court process and therefore reoffend.

Moving defendants to the front of the court, sitting or standing directly in front of a judge, is reckoned to be more “inclusive” and likely to prevent reoffending.

Believe this or not, courts minister Chester Borrows thinks it is a great idea and chief district court judge Jan Marie Doogue has approved the pilot.

Apparently justice minister Judith Collins is not involved.

 Of course Judith Collins isn’t involved, she knows where crims belong.

A Round Tuit

I think Comrade Kate might have a sulk about this. She could well be next after sitting on her hands over Section 6a for absolutely forever:

Minister of Courts Chester Borrows will be receiving an award from Timaru man Charles Simmons.

After waiting for eight years for his son Jeremy to get court-ordered reparation of $140 after his car was stolen in 2004, he began his own battle against bureaucracy to get answers.

The court has slowly been collecting the money and has $79.16, but is waiting for the sum to be fully recovered before it pays out to the son who now lives in Australia.

Last Wednesday, Mr Simmons received an identically worded letter from the minister to one he received on August 29, telling him staff were looking into the reparation owed to his son.

This week he decided to send back a strongly worded letter of his own and an award.

“All we ever get from your department is that your staff are looking into the matter. I ask you again minister, how long does it take one clerk to enter the file number on a computer, receive the details and advise the victim? Even if this government has laid off half the staff in the public service, surely you could find one clerk for 10 minutes to give you this information.

“All sorts of excuses have been made for the incompetence of your department and so I felt you minister deserve the attached award.

“It is the round-tuit award and is only awarded to a person or persons who have shown they are determined to some day get around to it, whatever it is they are supposed to have done.”

Focussing on the things that matter, Ctd

It used to be Labour that focussed on the things that matter to Kiwi voters. Now it looks like Richard Prosser is going to seriously challenge Trevor Mallard and Clare Curran for inanities on Twitter.