Chris Hipkins

Charter Schools reduce risk taking behaviours

More good news from research on the effects of US Charter Schools.

A couple of key points make it clear that the only reason unions and the political Left are against these here is that it wasn’t their idea (or they don’t give a rats backside about kids).

Low-income minority adolescents enrolled in California’s high-performing public charter high schools are less likely to engage in risky health behaviors, according to a new study by the University of California – Los Angeles.

Researchers said that these adolescents also scored better on Math and English tests as compared to their peers from other schools.

The researchers conclude that public charter high schools in low-income neighborhoods can cause beneficial health effects and bridge the growing academic achievement gap between wealthy and poor students.

The finding is published in the journal Paediatrics.

Read more »

Parents not the Village Idiots Labour/Unions think they are

Labour and the teacher unions spend their whole time treating the parents of school age children like they have IQs lower than a jam sandwich.

Examples are ignoring the benefits of National Standards (they are going to ban them of course), telling families in challenges areas that they don’t want Charter Schools (they are going to ban them of course), telling parents they will save $100 on donations – while charging them $3.50 a week for a “device”, etc.

Parents have clearly also seen through the – slap a few more teachers in the classroom (wherever they come from) and she’ll be right approach too.

New Zealanders would rather money was spent on improving teaching standards than on reducing class sizes, a Herald-DigiPoll survey reveals.

Education has become a political battleground before September’s election, with both major parties promising to spend hundreds of millions of dollars on it.

Asked about their priorities, more than 60 per cent of those polled said they would spend money on trying to improve teaching standards rather than cutting class sizes.  Read more »

Hands up who wants compulsory Te Reo?

The Labour party seems intent on transforming itself into a minor political party.

First there was the Man ban, then wanting to regulate trucks in the fast lane, their ongoing pandering to single interest groups, David Cunliffe’s apology for being a man and now they want to make Te Reo compulsory for every school child.

All New Zealand schoolchildren would learn Maori under Labour’s long-term plan for te reo, but it appears the party is loath to give the policy a high profile.

Labour Maori affairs spokeswoman Nanaia Mahuta and education spokesman Chris Hipkins indicated Labour had an “aspirational” target for Maori to be taught in all schools after the Maori Party’s Te Tai Tokerau candidate, Te Hira Paenga, claimed Labour had endorsed his party’s policy for compulsory te reo in schools.

“We are glad to see Labour at last getting the message that our reo is something that we all, as New Zealanders, should embrace,” Mr Paenga said.

Ms Mahuta initially suggested Mr Paenga had the wrong end of the stick, saying Labour would only promote its own policy which was “the recognition that te reo should be a working language for all New Zealanders”.

However, Ms Mahuta was far more direct in a debate held in Gisborne earlier this month when she said: “We’ve made a clear commitment that te reo Maori will be compulsory in our schools.”

Read more »

Things must be getting desperate in Hutt South, Mallard is still musing about Moas

You have to give Trevor Mallard some credit…when he latches onto a cunning stunt he really gives it his all.

Last election he wasted 6 months training his heart out to beat a fat lazy blogger in race around the streets of East Auckland, in a sport that consumes his every waking moment in between stints at his part time job in parliament as an MP.

He lacked the courage to have a crack at a sport of my choosing…boxing or Sporting Clays…he took the easy win and then shut up.

This time his brilliant campaign strategy is to repeatedly and vociferously advocate for the resurrection of a long dead bird…and I’m not talking about his political career here…rather he wants to investigate in saving and extinct bird, the moa.

Trevor Mallard just can’t let go of his fascination with resurrecting the moa.

Yesterday Inglewood, a town long associated with the extinct flightless bird, came to the attention of the Labour MP.

He was in Taranaki yesterday to talk about sport and recreation, but was fascinated to learn Inglewood was briefly known as Moatown in the mid-1870s.   Read more »

Labour’s Brilliant Strategy (version 3104.9.0)

Step 1 – Tell NZ that they (no… that’s right….the taxpayer) will give every school age child an online device.

Step 2 – Rescind that – it is only $100 starter and then you pay $3.50 a week (which is the money that you now don’t have to pay for school donations).  Read more »

It’s all a matter of trust. Or soundbite politics. Or something… #votepositive… maybe

DC:  Hey guys!  Let’s launch THE flagship policy of the election during my Congress keynote speech ok?   Read more »

Anyone see the irony in this tweet from Hipkins?

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This from the guy who’s just announced in education they’re going from value to volume?

Make up your mind!

Labour’s education ipad policy backtrack has begun

Yesterday it was free ipads for all school kids. Then Davide Cunliffe went on The Nation and gave a rather confusing answer to questions about the policy that was seeded with media as being free.

PG: Let’s turn now and talk policy, education, a policy out today you want every student from intermediate upward to have a tablet, to have an iPod?

DC: Absolutely, from year 5 to 13 under a Labour led government, every student will have their own personal digital device, it will be subsidised for parents to get into and there’ll be a very low cost payment plan with a hardship fund for those larger families who perhaps couldn’t afford it.

PG: So how will that payment plan work?

DC: You get a hundred dollars up front from the government, you buy a very low cost device which we are able to purchase in bulk, you pay based on the Manaiakalani model which is working in Point England in Auckland at the moment, about $3.50 a week for which you get service, insurance and out of school access to the Internet.

PG: So how many tablets are you talking?

DC: Oh, we’re talking enough for every student in the country.

PG: Do you know how many?

DC: We’ve based it on an estimate of 70-percent of pupils taking this up.

PG: So how many?

DC: I’ll come back to you with the exact numbers. I’m not going to give you an exact number-

PG: And how much is it going to cost?

DC: It’ll cost 19-million dollars in the first year, 41-million of operating expense in the second year and then cruises down to about 30 million a year after that.

PG: Because looking at this, this is universal isn’t it, iPads basically?

DC: They’re not necessarily iPads. In Manaiakalani they’ve used chrome books or notebooks.

PG: Every kid gets a tablet, son and daughter gets a tablet.

DC: Not necessarily a tablet. You want the best learning device at the best cost.

PG: Everybody gets a computer

DC: Everybody gets a computer. Some kids will have their own.

Read more »

Labour Planning to Bribe Middle Class Kids with bright lights

If this is true:

Labour is planning two major education announcements, expected to include a plan to provide iPads or laptops to school students, at its three-day congress starting in Wellington today.

In 2011 Labour said it would spend $75 million over four years to put laptops into the hands of 31,000 year 7 to year 13 students in low-decile schools, but it is expected to drop the plan to target the policy and make it universal at a much higher cost.

At the same time it is eyeing ways to ensure students can use the devices at home, by ensuring they have broadband access by creating ‘‘community learning networks’’.

The model for the plan, put together by education spokesman Chris Hipkins, is the East Tamaki Manaiakalani project which provides a community wi-fi network and supports the lease of devices to students and their families.

However, other approaches may also be used because the East Tamaki model may not be right for areas with lower population density.

Labour is also tipped to announce plans to upgrade schools and reallocate the $359m that the Government earmarked in January for specialist teachers and principals.

So the latest bribe is to put a massive amount of expensive technology into the hands of thousands and thousands of kids and families that already have it.   Read more »

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