Computing

Len Brown brings spying to Auckland and Fairfax shills for HP

Auckland is about to get super snooping capabilities with a multi-million dollar deal with Hewlett Packard that include Automatic Number Plate Recognition, Facial Recognition and video analytics.

Michael Field has taken a break from writing lies about Fiji and has turned his expert journalistic skills to touting for Hewlett Packard in what can really only be described as a native advertisement for them.

He has regurgitated large amounts of their press release in order to write his “story”.

To cap off the news article that is really an advertisement for Hewlett Packard they have even used HP’s own marketing video from Youtube.

Surveillance technology that uses high definition cameras and software that puts names to faces and owners to cars is coming to Auckland.

Surveillance will also include scanning social media and news websites.

Auckland Transport, the regional transport provider, has yet to announce the multi-million dollar deal, but California’s Hewlett-Packard Development Company said today it has the contract.

No dollar sum is given.   Read more »

How to complain to the Privacy Commissioner

Nicky Hager’s associates hacked my emails. He decided that it was his right to publish my emails.

He claims this is an honourable journalistic enterprise.

He is wrong.

He has written a book, he is making money from that book and has stated he wanted to attack me and the National party.

A book is not a journalistic enterprise, David Fisher has already paved the way in this respect with his High Court loss. Nicky Hager should have remembered that along with his lefty lawyer Steven Price. That case has not be appealed and stands as an important precedent.

Secondly in writing a book for money, and stating the reasons he wrote the book, he has established that there is malice involved. Any pretence of attempting to use journalists privileged has fallen by the wayside.

Worse still, since we are talking about journalists ethics, is that Nicky Hager failed to contact a single person he has written about in his book. Not one. He wrote the book and he published personal and private email conversations without so much as asking permission from other parties, or indeed the owner of the emails. Even I had the courtesy of speaking to Matthew Blomfield and offering him a right of reply, I even posted his right of reply unaltered, I recorded those conversations as well so they cannot be denied. I even rang Len Brown before we published.

Nicky Hager didn’t do any of those things.

Here is the thing though…he is threatening to dump more emails. You have to wonder why? Surely he put the best ones in the rather thin 140 page book?

Nicky Hager has brought News of the World style hacking to New Zealand, rather ironic don’t you think?

Hacking emails, breaching people’s privacy all for profit.

And he dares to claim it is the National party involved in dirty politics.    Read more »

Labour should’ve looked overseas before launching their loans for ipads policy

Ever since Labour launched their free…what?…It’s not free?…oh ok…loans for iPads policy the evidence has been pouring out that the policy is hopelessly flawed from the get go.

They lauded it as something innovative…except of course it has been done to death around the world and mostly to death, as schools are finding out.

For an entire school year Hillsborough, New Jersey, educators undertook an experiment, asking: Is the iPad really the best device for interactive learning?

It’s a question that has been on many minds since 2010, when Apple released the iPad and schools began experimenting with it. The devices came along at a time when many school reformers were advocating to replace textbooks with online curricula and add creative apps to lessons. Some teachers welcomed the shift, which allowed their students to replace old poster-board presentations with narrated screencasts and review teacher-produced video lessons at any time.

Four years later, however, it’s still unclear whether the iPad is the device best suited to the classroom. The market for educational technology is huge and competitive: During 2014, American K-12 schools will spend an estimated $9.94 billion on educational technology, an increase of 2.5 percent over last year, according to Joseph Morris, director of market intelligence at the Center for Digital Education. On average, he said, schools spend about a third of their technology budgets on computer hardware.  Read more »

iPads in schools cost Los Angeles schools over a $1billion and now they are ditching the project

Labour launched their schools policy and one of the key planks was their free loan scheme for iPads.

Sounds good right?

I mean nowhere else in the world has ever tried doing this have they?

Labour really cracked out an innovative policy this time didn’t they?

Nope on all three counts.

The Los Angeles Unified School District’s plan to give every child an iPad—at a cost of $1 billion to taxpayers—drew universal criticism after numerous problems arose. For one thing, when the devices were broken, lost, or stolen, it wasn’t clear whether parents, the schools, or the kids themselves were responsible. Tech-savvy students easily broke through the firewalls administrators had installed to keep them from using the devices to visit social media websites. This prompted some schools to prohibit the use of the iPads at home, when students are away from teacher supervision, even though one of the major intended functions of the iPad program was to give kids a homework aid.

The entire thing was an unmitigated disaster—a clear example of real life trumping the good intentions of bureaucrats

But LAUSD has clearly learned its lesson, right? Wrong:

Read more »

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Death by E-mail

We have all experienced it. That moment when you read an e-mail and react emotionally to it. Some of us immediately send off a reply while still in the throes of anger. Others sit on it a while and carefully craft a reply. Very few of us pick up the phone or go to the person directly and ask them if our interpretation of what they were implying in the e-mail was correct.

Upsetting e-mail

Upsetting e-mail

The problem is tone, as we have no way of telling what it actually is from the words on the screen. It is left to us to add the tone and depending on our mood at the time and many other factors we can easily get it wrong. In my personal experience when that happens it is all down hill from there. People feel free to say things in an e-mail when they are angry that they would never ever have the balls to say to your face.

In the past I had a relationship seriously damaged because the only way the person would communicate with me was by e-mail. Once the flame war started there seemed to be no way to put it out. No matter how carefully I crafted my replies I was perceived as being hostile and to be fair I felt that the replies to me were incredibly hostile and nasty as well. Eventually I decided that I would only make matters worse by continuing so I just stopped.

Read more »

Unsurprising really, I haven’t used Microsoft products for years

I haven’t used Microsoft Office products in years.

I mostly live in the cloud and where possible use Google Apps and in the past have used OpenOffice as a viable alternative to Office.

Office applications became more and more bloated and the days of massive installations on hard drives to do basic things like simple spreadsheets and documents is long gone.

The advent of tablet and mobile computing has pretty much killed off applications like Office.

It may be one of Microsoft’s biggest squandered opportunities.

Tired of waiting for Office to be optimised for their mobile gadgets, a growing contingent of younger companies is turning to cheaper, simpler and touch-friendly apps that can perform word processing and other tasks in the cloud.

Take Artivest Holdings, a New York-based financial services startup that sells alternative investment products. The New York-based company uses an app called Quip, which combines word processing and messaging, to handle all but the most sensitive legal and financial files.  Read more »

“We should be very afraid”…apparently

Why does TVNZ continue to parade Labour flunkies before us and pretend they aren’t. This one says we should be afraid.

Some government departments now have the ability to monitor New Zealanders’ online movements.

ONE News has revealed three ministries are trialling a system that’s catching public messages posted on social media.

Every tweet, Facebook post and video uploaded to YouTube could be of interest to government agencies.

“We should be very afraid. Now why are they doing this?” says Michael Bott, human rights lawyer.

Michael Bott is a failed Labour party candidate, and now he suggests we should be afraid that someone can hoover up publicly available tweets and Facebook messages.  Read more »

Twitter trying to deal with online abuse and bullying in Australia

Twitter is moving to ban online abuse and implement systems to control online bullying using their service.

INTERNET giant Twitter has moved to ban online abuse, as the Federal Government called on it to establish an Australian outpost to deal with community concerns.

The development came as still more victims of cyber hate campaigns came forward yesterday, including top surfer Laura Enever and TV personality Nathan Jolliffe.

Three days after The Daily Telegraph launched its #StoptheTrolls campaign, a Twitter spokeswoman finally responded to questions yesterday, saying the company was taking the issue of online harassment seriously.

“We take this issue extremely seriously and have recently updated our abuse policy to make targeted abuse against our terms of service,” Twitter spokeswoman Rachel Bremer said.

She did not specify when the policy was updated or what specifically had changed, however Twitter’s rules of engagement now clearly state: “Technical abuse and user abuse is not tolerated on Twitter.com, and will result in permanent suspension.”

Rules also include: “You may not publish or post direct, specific threats of violence against others” and “you may not publish or post other people’s private and confidential information”.  Read more »

Ugly couple use nicked phone to out themselves as dud roots

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Someone nicked a cellphone in the US and it has ended up in the possession of this couple, who are now remotely uploading photos and videos of their dud root sessions to the Dropbox of the original owner of the phone.

A WOMAN is trying to track down the couple that is using her stolen phone after she found their raunchy selfies uploaded to one of her online accounts.

Victoria Brodsky, 39, from Brooklyn in the US, found naked pictures of the couple and even found a video of them engaging in a sex act.

“It seemed like they were getting off after taking the phone,” Ms Brodsky told The New York Daily News . “I would love it if they were caught. It’s one thing to steal, but they’re celebrating.”   Read more »

Did you forget this tweet Martyn?

Martyn Bradbury was busted yesterday…in the documents I released he asked for $5000 for a new laptop, phone and tablet…becuase if he was going to represent the Internet Party he’d ned cool toys.

bradbury-request

Bradbury claims he isn’t on the payroll…yet…but strangely re-tweets every tweet of Kim Dotcom’s…he’s worse than the Gurnard.

But did he forget this tweet on January 7?  Read more »