David Cameron

EU reacts with petulance, exactly like Brexit campaigners predicted

The EU technocrats have reacted badly to a sovereign nation exercising its democratic rights.

A senior EU leader has confirmed the bloc wants Britain out as soon as possible, warning that David Cameron’s decision to delay the start of Brexit negotiations until his successor is in place may not be fast enough.

Cameron announced on Friday morning that he would step down as prime minister by the autumn, after the British public caused a political earthquake by voting 52%-48% to leave the European Union.

Martin Schulz, the president of the European parliament, told the Guardian that EU lawyers were studying whether it was possible to speed up the triggering of article 50 of the Lisbon treaty – the untested procedure for leaving the union.

As the EU’s institutions scrambled to respond to the bodyblow of Britain’s exit, Schulz said uncertainty was “the opposite of what we need”, adding that it was difficult to accept that “a whole continent is taken hostage because of an internal fight in the Tory party”.

“I doubt it is only in the hands of the government of the United Kingdom,” he said. “We have to take note of this unilateral declaration that they want to wait until October, but that must not be the last word.”

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At least one Guardian journalist gets it

While the left-wing continues to unhinge at least one Guardian journalist, Matthew d’Ancona, has finally understood what Brexit was all about:

Before analysis, let us admit to awe: the sheer scale of the moment requires it. The word “historic” is deployed too lazily in political discourse. But it is entirely appropriate this morning. This is a hugely significant day in British (and European) history.

When a party loses an election, its soon-to-be-ex-leader rallies the troops and promises a different result next time. But no such option is open to the crushed chieftains of remain today. There is no “next time”.

This was a unique opportunity to seal Britain’s relationship with the European Union, or to end it. And the voters – at a high level of turnout – decided that it was time to go. They heard the warnings, listened to experts of every kind tell them that Brexit meant disaster, watched the prime minister as he urged them not to take a terrible risk. And their answer was: get stuffed.   Read more »

Done like a dog’s dinner, says Audrey Young about David Cameron

Audrey Young provides her opinion on Brexit with a slight segue to John Key and his own referendum troubles.

David Cameron would never have called a referendum on the EU if he thought he would be done like a dog’s dinner, as he has been.

He had supreme confidence in his leadership ability and powers of persuasion when he announced in 2013 why he wanted a referendum. He over-estimated.

It has mild echoes of a far less important referendum promoted by his friend and a similarly unpersuasive Prime Minister John Key on changing the flag.

Cameron fittingly announced tonight he will relinquish his captain’s cap before the Conservatives conference in Birmingham, on October 2.

He has shown leadership in resigning. I wonder when Jeremy Corbyn will likewise show some leadership by resigning, having led Labour down the wrong path of the EU?

[H]istory will define him as a loser and Remainers will beat him up for a miscalculation in holding the referendum at all. So why did he?

EU membership had become such a divisive issue in Britain, he felt it had to be confronted properly.

As Cameron said in his 2013 speech: “Democratic consent for the EU in Britain is now wafer thin.”

You don’t answer the growing perception of a deficit of democracy with another commission of inquiry.

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Hero to Zero: David Cameron gone after Brexit vote

Politics is a fickle beast: you can go from hero to zero in the time it takes to count the votes in a referendum.

David Cameron looked on top of the world a few short months ago, with an opposition leader who is completely tits. However, he backed the wrong horse in the EU referendum and now must fall on his sword. It’s what leaders do, and David Cameron has.

James Delingpole explains:

“How would it be for David Cameron if he lost this Referendum?”

When a BBC crew asked me this two days ago I don’t think either they or I imagined for a moment that this scenario would come to pass.

“It would be an utter disaster for him!” I said, with perhaps a hint of glee.

But it’s not at all how I’m feeling right now. Actually, in the end, Schadenfreude is an ugly emotion. Dave and I were friends once and though he has done an awful lot since as a politician which has irritated me beyond measure, I can take no joy in his downfall.

It was a self-inflicted downfall too, which is what must make it even harder to bear for him.

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Poms vote to Brexit, Porridge Wogs want to stay

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The EU referendum results aren’t yet final but it is almost certain that it is for Brexit.

The BBC and ITV have declared Leave wins, as results continue to show a much stronger Leave vote in electorates that supported leaving than Stay votes in those electorates that voted stay.

All major outlets are now calling it for Leave.

Only Scotland massively supported staying in the EU and now they will likely leave the UK. The Poms will be extremely happy if the Porridge Wogs leave. Labour will be gutted though as it is their stronghold.   Read more »

The Remain campaign disconnect

Janet Daley discusses the peculiarly British response to the killing of an MP, suspending campaigning but also how the threats and stupidity of the Remain camp derailed themselves.

In truth, what became clear in the hours and days after this crime were the common humanity of the British people and the natural decency of the country’s institutions. The immediate, unanimous decision to suspend campaigning on the referendum; the expressions of obviously sincere sympathy and support from all sides of the House; and the decision by the major parties not to contest the by-election which will result from the death of a Labour MP: here was the traditional British character as I have come to know it. It was quite extraordinary to see politicians who had been bashing seven bells out of each other only moments before, instantly restored to benign civility.

This was the real revelation: not the shocking appearance of a single, isolated individual who seemed to be filled with hate, but the response of everyone else.  This is not a vicious country full of antagonism and resentment. It could only seem that way to somebody who sat alone in front of a computer all day – which, of course, is precisely what unstable, isolated individuals are inclined to do.

And that brings us back to the substance of the great debate that must now be reignited. How is it that those very politicians who reacted to a startling tragedy with such immediate, faultless responsiveness to the national mood, could have been failing for weeks to show the slightest understanding of how their own countrymen think?

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More polls confirming Brexit is likely

More polls have revealed that Brexit is increasingly likely.

Support for leaving the EU is strengthening, with phone and online surveys reporting a six-point lead, according to a pair of Guardian/ICM polls.

Leave now enjoys a 53%-47% advantage once “don’t knows” are excluded, according to research conducted over the weekend, compared with a 52%-48% split reported by ICM a fortnight ago.

The figures will make grim reading for David Cameron, George Osborne and the Labour party. They follow a fortnight in which immigration became the dominant issue in the referendum campaign, with the publication of official figures showing that net migration had risen to a near-record 333,000 in 2015.

Prof John Curtice of Strathclyde University, who analyses available referendum polling data on his website whattheukthinks.org, noted that after the ICM data, the running average “poll of polls” would stand at 52% for leave and 48% for remain, the first time leave has been in such a strong position.

Both online and telephone polls show the same lead for leave.

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When an MP has to say they are loyal…they aren’t

Boris Johnson has professed his undying loyalty to David Cameron…watch for a coup shortly after the Brexit vote.

Boris Johnson was embroiled in an extraordinary row last night after he admitted discussing the possibility of a leadership challenge against David Cameron with a fellow Tory MP.

Mr Johnson, the clear favourite to be the next Tory leader, met Alec Shelbrooke in his Commons office and speculated about the number of Tory MPs prepared to back a no-confidence vote in the Prime Minister.

According to one version of the encounter, Boris said: ‘Are there 50 names?’ – a reference to the number of renegade MPs required to trigger a contest.

The former London Mayor last night confirmed that he met Mr Shelbrooke in his office and held a conversation about how many Tory MPs backed a coup – but insisted he had talked about ‘how vital it was to keep the party together under Dave’s leadership’.

The secret meeting comes as anti-Cameron plotters step up their activity following a spate of polls showing the referendum on a knife edge.   Read more »

Poms set for Brexit

It looks like Brexit is on based on the latest poll which has seen a massive swing in favour of exiting the EU.

The campaign to take Britain out of the EU has opened up a remarkable 10-point lead over the Remain camp, according to an exclusive poll for The Independent.

The survey of 2,000 people by ORB found that 55 per cent believe the UK should leave the EU (up four points since our last poll in April), while 45 per cent want it to remain (down four points). These figures are weighted to take account of people’s likelihood to vote. It is by far the biggest lead the Leave camp has enjoyed since ORB began polling the EU issue for The Independent a year ago, when it was Remain who enjoyed a 10-point lead. Now the tables have turned.

Even when the findings are not weighted for turnout, Leave is on 53 per cent (up three points since April) and Remain on 47 per cent (down three). The online poll, taken on Wednesday and Thursday, suggests the Out camp has achieved momentum at the critical time ahead of the 23 June referendum.   Read more »

That’ll learn the idiot world leaders who think Poms will listen to them

The Brexit camp is leading in the latest poll.

The leave campaign has picked up momentum and taken a three-point lead over remain in the latest Observer/Opinium poll on the EU referendum. The Brexiters now stand on 43%, while 40% say they support the campaign to keep the UK in the union.

The poll suggests the remain camp has lost four percentage points in the last two weeks, during which Boris Johnson and Michael Gove have relentlessly campaigned on the theme of immigration.

The leave campaign appears to have picked up three percentage points. The potential in the leave campaign’s strategy is reflected in responses suggesting that two in five voters (41%) cite immigration as one of their two most important issues when deciding how to vote. Just over a third (35%) cite Britain’s ability to make its own laws without EU interference and 29% cite the impact of leaving on the UK economy.

Half of the 2,007 people surveyed said they believed that immigration would be under better control if the UK did leave the EU. Twelve percent felt that the UK would have more control if the country retained its EU membership, and 24% said there would be little difference.   Read more »