David Cunliffe

Matt should show this graph to David Cunliffe

David Cunliffe apparently had no idea about polls over the weekend and had he known about it he said he wouldn’t have had a holiday.

This is of course a lie, because all media go to the leaders prior to running polls for comments.

But he should really look at this chart from Danyl McLauchlan:

Updated the tracking poll. For variety’s sake this one goes all the way back to the start of 2005. It doesn’t correct for bias and the large circles intersecting the vertical lines are election results:

nzpolls20140721nobiascorr Read more »

Pray…it’s the only thing he’s got…and hope

David Cunliffe is being told to pray…it’s the only hope he’s got.

David Cunliffe just can’t catch a break. Even his oldest childhood friend doesn’t fancy his chances in September’s general election.

”The local candidate [Steve Gibson] for the Labour party is a complete and utter idiot,” Pleasant Point sheep farmer Andrew Steven tells the Labour leader. ”And I had to throw him out of the house and demand the cheque back … I’d like to support David but I can’t support the local candidate,” he says.

Pray, is Reverend Sue Dickson’s advice. Cunliffe says he does – daily. ”You are doing the right thing … having your faith connection when everything seems to be kind of lost,” she counsels.

Naturally Cunliffe isn’t ready to accept that’s he lost – but Dickson has a point.

With just two months before voters go to the ballot box, the latest brace of polls have Labour languishing in the mid-20s. Personal support for Cunliffe has dipped below 10 per cent. Party disloyalty once again reared its head at the weekend, with an insider sniping to media about the leader’s week-long skiing holiday.

In fact, the family break was just three days – and on Friday Cunliffe was in the rural South Canterbury town where he spent his teenage years.

It was part of a media drive to boost Cunliffe’s public profile – and an opportunity to catch up with those he grew up with.

”There are huge numbers of people who are only just waking up now to the fact that we’ve got an election this year. They are saying who is this guy, we need to get to know him … and I’m going to let people in,” Cunliffe explains.

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Now he’s sorry for being sorry for being a man…oh and for wearing a red scarf

David Cunliffe really does have a bad habit of being sorry.

Three weeks ago he was sorry for being a man. Yesterday he was sorry for going on holiday.

Today he is sorry for being sorry for being a man.

Mr Cunliffe said it been an “unhelpful” distraction. “I accept the way that was quoted out of context and bounced was unhelpful and I am determined that I will be extremely careful about the way I put things going forward.”

The Labour leader also said he would have reconsidered taking a holiday in the recess if he had known how bad the polls were. His red scarf would get fewer outings after comments were made about the regularity with which he wore it.

“I, like everybody else, need to stick closely to the core issues and I will be extremely careful about those little things, such as the scarf, that can become distractions.”

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Cartoon of the Day

Credit:  SonovaMin

Credit: SonovaMin

Sledge of the Day

John Key monsters David Cunliffe in the house…and boy did The Cunliffe not like it.

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First it was for being a man, now it is for taking a holiday, Cunliffe apologises again

David Cunliffe is a pathetic half man and has now developed a habit of apologising.

A couple of weeks ago it was for being a man and now he is apologising for taking a holiday.

Labour leader David Cunliffe says he would not have gone on his skiing holiday had he known how bad the polls were for Labour at the time and has also decided only to focus on major policies – including appearing to distance himself from Labour’s new animal testing policy.

Mr Cunliffe has spent the day dealing with a new spat of leadership speculation following a string of bad polls and criticism of him.

He emerged from his first caucus meeting since those polls saying he took responsibility for his part in them, including an acknowledgement that his “I’m sorry I’m a man” statement on domestic violence had misfired, although he said he did not resile from his statement on domestic violence.

Mr Cunliffe also said caucus had not criticised him over his decision to take a holiday last week “but with the information I now have about movement in the polls, which I didn’t have when I made that decision, I would have made a different decision”.

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Good moves by National on local body politics

National has announced some good initiatives around local body politics today, while Labour is splurging even more money at a sector that can and does does the citizens hard already.

The Government will “crowdsource” for new ideas on how to get rid of “dumb” local and central government regulations, Prime Minister John Key says.

He told the Local Government New Zealand conference in Nelson today that a Rules Reduction Task Force would be established in response to the latest Productivity Commission report. The task force would look at local and central government regulation.

Some rules homeowners faced were “dumb” and “needless bureaucratic hurdles”, Key said.

“Some things on the face of it don’t make much sense, like making it compulsory for a homeowner to install windows in a room that already lets in a lot of light through the ranch-slider doors,” Key told delegates.

The task force would be comprised of officials and tradespeople to “root out local regulation that could be improved”.

“We already know there are property owners up and down the country who are frustrated with the regulatory requirements they must meet, and the time and money it takes to complete transactions,” Key said.

“The decisions that councils make on regulation affect the whole country.”

Finance Minister Bill English has said that local government rules added to construction costs.

Key said the task force would develop ideas with the public.

“It is my intention that we invite ratepayers and homeowners around the country to contribute their thoughts on removing unnecessary rules and regulations via email and social media,” Key said.

“If you like, we’ll be crowdsourcing ways to reduce the rules and regulations that stop people doing sensible things with their own properties.”

“There are some things that homeowners go through because councils are required to implement regulations and rules which are completely outdated, that were written for a particular reason but which no longer work,” Key said after his speech.

“Essentially what we’re going to say to New Zealanders is ‘look, if you can see crazy rules and regulations that you have to comply with, that make no sense, email them to us’.

“We think we’ll be able to do a rewrite of a lot of those regulations, particularly for property owners.”

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War footing has moved to “fight back”

David Cunliffe is a big fan of bumper sticker slogans.

When he was elected leader by his union paymasters he exclaimed that Labour was no on a “war footing”, that they were going to “take the battle to National” and he even created a “war room” which now resembles the bunker of an under siege despot.

Today however he is challenging Rocky Balboa and describing the yet to be seen revival of labour’s electoral fortunes as a “fight back”.

Labour leader David Cunliffe says he is “not making light” of recent bad polls and insists his MPs are united behind him.

A string of polls has put Labour support in the mid-20s and Cunliffe said this afternoon’s caucus meeting, postponed to allow him to get back from delivering a speech in Nelson, would have some “earnest conversations about how we can do better”.

“I am sure that the caucus will be as determined as I am that we stick to our knitting and to our core messages about jobs, homes and families, and avoid distractions,” Cunliffe said.

He scoffed at suggestions that some in his caucus were “doing the numbers” on a leadership change.

“That’s nonsense, absolute nonsense. I am confident I have the full support of my caucus.”

Cunliffe insisted Labour could win the election, now less than two months away. The party was much larger, it had done more canvassing of voters and had better organisation to turn out the vote.

“Those advantages don’t show up until the polling [voting] opens,” he said.

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City-centric Labour setting off on regional bribe charm offensive

Having lost support hand over fist in their usual urban strongholds, Labour quite incongruously turns its attention to National heartland holding a fat cheque book

Cunliffe is set to use his appearance at the Local Government New Zealand conference in Nelson to say that if elected Labour would set aside tens of millions of dollars a year for a contestable fund for regional capital projects, focusing on infrastructure development.

Today’s announcement by Cunliffe – who has been under fire over his decision to take a skiing holiday in Central Otago last week as Labour slumped in the polls – will be the latest in an attempt to promote Labour’s plan for an “economic upgrade”.

It is believed the plan will propose the setting aside of a similar amount for capital projects as National did when it announced at its conference $212 million for “regionally important state highway projects”.

It is also expected that regional development would be restored as a ministerial portfolio.

National has a dedicated fund to promote investment in irrigation, although it aims to achieve at least a modest return for the Government.

Labour’s fund would take a “triple bottom line” approach where projects allocated funds would not necessarily need to make a commercial return to the Crown, but would be justified on the basis that the Treasury coffers would be boosted long-term through higher income tax and lower welfare payments coming from increased employment.

Don’t you love it?  “Triple bottom line”.  Meaning, here’s some money, don’t worry if you actually do anything useful with it  - we won’t hold you to account if you use it to upgrade the fleet of company cars.   As brilliant as it is blatant.   Read more »

Misleading again, why can’t Cunliffe just tell the truth?

David Cunliife was taking questions yesterday at Stuff.

It was pretty hostile and the rest was filled with weasel words.

Like his addressing of the issue regarding Kiwis in Australia.

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