David Cunliffe

Guess who won Massey University’s Quote of the Year competition?

Massey University held its usual Quote of the Year competition recently, and one of my quotes from the election campaign and Dirty Politics was a finalist.

The finalist quotes were:

I’m sorry for being a man. (David Cunliffe’s unusual apology at Labour’s domestic violence policy launch at a Women’s Refuge forum)

We think it’s, um, pretty legal. (Steven Joyce asked by reporters about the use of a song for the National election campaign that sounded very similar to one by Eminen)

You work in news you puffed up little shit!…When will you glove puppets of Cameron Slater just piss off? (Internet Party press secretary Pam Corkery at a campaign event, when the media kept asking for an interview with Kim Dotcom)

It was all steam and no hangi. (Te Tai Tokerau MP Kelvin Davis describing Internet-Mana after it failed to deliver on the hype on election day)

He could probably survive shooting little kittens in his garden with a shotgun. (Kim Dotcom on how little impact Dirty Politics had on Prime Minister John Key’s approval ratings.

I play politics like Fijians play rugby. My role is smashing your face into the ground. (Whale Oil blogger Cameron Slater after Nicky Hager’s book Dirty Politics was released)

I did not have textual relations with that blogger. (Spoof of John Key’s initial denial that he had received texts from Whale Oil blogger Cameron Slater tweeted by Lloyd Burr of RadioLive)

It terrifies me how much of our economy is stuck inside a dairy cow. (Comedian Te Radar talking to farmers at Fieldays)

Get past the breath-taking PR snow job. (Former CERA communications adviser Tina Nixon describing the press conference to announce the resignation of chief executive Roger Sutton after a sexual harassment complaint)

No more beersies for you. (Tagline in this year’s Health Promotion Agency advertising campaign to reduce harmful alcohol consumption.)

Guess which quote has won.   Read more »

Audrey Young has been at the Kool-Aid too

It looks like dear old Audrey Young has been drinking the Kool-Aid too.

She writes about whether or not Matt McCarten is going to be able to save Labour.

The answer is easy, it is no, for two reasons…one is he won’t be in place for long and second is he isn’t what his legend makes him out to be.

Undeterred by the obvious Audrey Young attempts to ignore it all.

An extraordinary thing happened in the Labour Party last week.

It went largely uncommented upon because extraordinary things happening in Labour are not unusual at the moment.

The party has been utterly entranced by new leader Andrew Little, who almost did not get back into Parliament at all after the election. It’s the stuff of fantasy, Little rightly muses.

But so, too, was his appointment of Matt McCarten as his permanent chief of staff.

It is the same Matt McCarten who spent a lot of his Machiavellian years if not trying to destroy Labour then at least trying to supplant it on the left with the breakaway Alliance. He was also the key adviser to a leader who took the party to its worst result in 92 years.   Read more »

Sorry seems to be the hardest word

Demanding politicians apologise can get rather cringeworthy at times, they can wind up being almost like the apology Father Jack Hackett gave to Bishop Brennan.

But Labour is focussing now on the fact that the only apology, such as it was, issued by John Key last year was to me.

Why they OIA’d that is beyond me…what a waste of time.

John Key delivered just a solitary written apology in 2014, ironically to one of New Zealand’s most controversial political figures.

According to Key “to the best of my recollection”, the prime minister wrote just one letter of apology this year, parliamentary questions asked by the Labour Party show.

Perhaps ironically, that single apology was delivered to Cameron Slater, the WhaleOil blogger who largely supports National but has brought much controversy upon the Government.   Read more »

Cartoon of the Day

Credit:  SonovaMin

Credit: SonovaMin

Garner’s winners and losers

Duncan Garner has published his list of winners and losers for 2014.

I will be talking with Garner at 1545  about this on Radio Live.

My political winners and losers of the year.

WINNERS

1. JOHN KEY

For all the obvious reasons. He is still the PM and he is still widely popular according to the polls. He had the kitchen sink thrown at him and he almost won the election outright. He’ll have to watch it doesn’t go to his head.

2. ANDREW LITTLE

Couldn’t win a fight in a kindergarten but ends the year on top. His caucus didn’t want him, his party didn’t want him, his electorate didn’t want him. Yet he ends the year looking strong and competent as Labour’s new leader.

3. KELVIN DAVIS

He beat Hone Harawira and therefore beat Kim Dotcom – do I have to say anymore?

4. SUE BRADFORD

She knew Dotcom and Harawira were in an unholy alliance and she put her principles before it all. She called it right – she has values and principles that are beyond reproach whether you agree with her politics or not.

5. CAM SLATER – WHALEOIL.

Yes he’s a dirt-bag, muck-raking, scum-bag attack blogger, but he likes it that way. He doesn’t play by any rule book yet he’s been judged a journalist by the courts. Despite having his dirty laundry aired for the world to see he remains talked about, his blog gets more hits than ever, he breaks stories and the PM returns his texts. Oh and he wins mainstream media awards.

Read more »

David Cunliffe and “Vote Positive” slated as major reasons for Labour’s failure

Not sure why I had any hope that Labour’s internal review as to why they had the worst election results for around 80 years was going to produce something beyond the obvious.  Claire Trevett reports

Labour’s review panel has reported its findings back about the party’s election campaign and the reasons for the low 25 per cent result, identifying problems ranging from a failure to unite behind former leader David Cunliffe to resourcing and confusion over its “Vote Positive” slogan.

The panel of four reported back to Labour’s Council at the weekend on the first part of its three-part review – a look into the election campaign.

The party will not release review findings until all three parts are completed, expected in February.

One of the review team, Bryan Gould, said the panel’s terms of reference had included the leadership of Mr Cunliffe and while there were mixed views on some issues, the main problem was a failure to unite behind the leader.

“It is very important to unite behind your leader. Probably that’s one of the key messages. We didn’t shy away from any issue. I don’t think we went overboard, but we told it as it seemed to us.”

Astounding.   Failure to unite behind a leader.

Let me tell you something.  If people don’t want to follow you, then you’re not a leader.  Typical Labour.  They think they can legislate things away, just like they think they can order people to follow a leader.

After all this “research”, they are still completely lost.  This is what they should say:

We picked the wrong leader.  Our process for picking party leaders is flawed when it allows a leader to be selected that does not have the backing of the wider party.

As for the Vote Positive slogan.  It really didn’t make sense.  Everyone thought it was a head scratcher.  That was, of course, until the Dirty Politics book came out.   Then it all slotted in as part of a strategy.

Not that it worked.  The electorate saw it for what it was:  an organised Labour Party hit using the usual channels.  Nicky Hager may be celebrated in the murky black ops areas of the left, but he is deeply distrusted by middle New Zealand.

Let’s not forget that National nearly managed an outright majority for the first time in the MMP era.

If that isn’t a message that the left is totally lost, I don’t know what is.

 

– NZ Herald

Some words of caution for Andrew Little and Labour, but will they listen?

Tony Alexander, in his latest newsletter, has some words of caution for Andrew Little and the Labour party about the path they have embarked on.

Last week I noted that there are some trends which people (businesses I suppose, truth be told) should keep an eye on. These included growing wealth inequality and employers exploiting staff. Perhaps this latter thread is one of the motivating factors behind the new Leader of the Opposition’s announcement that he will set up a two year “Future of Work Commission”. The intention is that this project will examine changes in the way people work via numerous workshops and extensive contact with various groups. The risk is that it ends
up being a grumpy free for all for all and sundry so the first task of the work which Grant Robertson will lead is to tightly define what they wish specifically to focus on and go from there.

Good luck to them because one outcome of the GFC is an altered relationship between employers and employees. But more than that whole new industries and jobs have appeared, there is more casualisation and contracting, and a generation of people have come through the education system and entered the workforce with minimal awareness of what unions can offer them. And that union movement suffers greatly from being associated with exactly that – a politically motivated always Labour-supporting “movement” rather than true representation of employee concerns.

These are early days for the re-elected National government and early days for the latest Labour Party leader, so the thrust of changes in the employee-employer relationship for the next three years is still likely to be in the direction of further empowering the former. But employers should keep an eye on the building undercurrent of discontent among the working poor in particular, what the Aussies call the “battlers”, and where possible seek input into the new Commission.

Read more »

Meet the new boss, just like the old boss, ctd

First we had a David, now we have an Andrew.   But nothing has changed.

qweqwewq

Another Labour leader that has the audience in the palm of his hand.

And he didn’t stop there.    Read more »

Boag vs. Slater 2.0

boag1

On Friday night the poisonous lying scumbag that is Michelle Boag was on the Paul Henry show…with my mate Willie Jackson.

Willie called her a sycophant repeatedly, which she is. She probably believes she was the one who got John Key into parliament but his biography and various public statements say otherwise much to her unending disappointment.

However she made a statement during her brief and incredibly made up performance.

“The thing is that Cameron appears to support the National Party and if he really was a supporter of the party he wouldn’t even try to contact Key,” says Ms Boag, who believes that Key hasn’t had any contact with Slater for months.

What would she know.

She went on to describe me as toxic etc and said if she was advising John Key he should dump me.

Yeah…so given her claims about benefitting or not benefitting the National party shall we look at our prospective records.   Read more »

Request for the Ground Crew – Andrew “Who?” Little

This is what Andrew Little looks like

This is what Andrew Little looks like

Andrew “Who?” Little has made a terrible start to his tenure as Labour Party leader.

He seems hell bent on promoting New Zealand’s favourite political blog, rather than articulating a vision for New Zealand.

Maybe he is as dead set useless as David Cunliffe who became leader then didn’t have anything ready to run with because he was a lazy bastard during his previous 14 years in power?    Read more »