David Cunliffe

Impertinent questions

Are David Cunliffe, Chris Hipkins and others really asking for a full inquiry into Dirty Politics?

A FULL inquiry?

Have they forgotten the hacker only provided emails damaging to the National Party?

Have they forgotten all my emails were stolen, also those damaging to everyone else?

Don’t they think I would be part of a FULL inquiry?

Do they expect me to protect all my sources, as a journalist?

How much are they hoping that Judge Asher declares that I am a journalist and media so that I CAN protect my sources with privilege?

Or do they expect me to tell everything?

Are we going to see more pre-emptive articles in the NZ Herald, this time from left politicians and staff?

How are things in the war room?

Cullen coached Cunliffe

I called the Leaders debate a marginal win for David Cunliffe. ¬†Certainly, the TVNZ results weren’t representative of how the debate unfolded. ¬† Key was over prepared. ¬†He was driving hard to get get the messages out, and instead of being relaxed and showing us John Key, he appeared forced.

I bet the hand in his pocket was a fist most of the time.

But it turns out that John Key wasn’t just debating David Cunliffe

He spent much of his career taunting National’s front bench, famously dismissing John Key as a “rich prick” and developing a reputation as the sharpest politician of his generation.

So Sir Michael Cullen can scarcely have imagined he would later play the role of Key, charged with winding up and unsettling Labour’s leader in a hostile debate.

While critics are split on the outcome of Thursday night’s TVNZ leaders’ debate, most seemed surprised at how polished David Cunliffe was.

This was no accident. Labour viewed the importance of the first televised debate as second only to election day. It had half a million viewers, most seeing Cunliffe on an equal footing with the prime minister for the first time. Read more »

Armstrong on Dirty Politics v Economics

If – as the participants keep insisting – this election is really about “the things that matter”, then the question of which of the two major parties has the economic agenda with the most foresight would be dominating the campaign.

That question should, in fact, be dominating the campaign. But it is not the case. The campaign has instead been consumed with the Dirty Politics farrago. Just about everything else has been shut out.

That has hindered Labour by drawing attention away from its policy releases. But it has also forced National to delay what it must surely have been planning – an all-out assault on Labour’s planned capital gains tax.

It might surprise some voters, but Labour has no intention of relaunching that policy which first appeared in its 2011 manifesto.

Labour is not stupid. It can claim to be winning the theoretical argument for such a tax. But that could easily unravel if the argument shifts to the detail of how the tax will be applied in practice – and to what extent dollars-wise. Read more »

Fran O’ on David Cunliffe rising from the ashes

David Cunliffe finally injected himself into the election race this week with a confident – if not triumphal – performance in the first television leaders’ debate.

For long-time Cunliffe watchers this was hardly a surprise.

He has always excelled as a debater and did not (for once) overlay his performance with that occasional smirking hint of moral superiority which can make the bile rise.

That he managed to win the debate – despite Labour having been comprehensively knocked in two political polls in a row – was a triumph of discipline and will.

A lesser politician would have found it very difficult indeed to come off the back foot under the full glare of the cameras against New Zealand’s most popular Prime Minister.

What was a surprise – and again shouldn’t have been – was the lack-lustre performance of John Key.

Key has been knocked by the Dirty Politics revelations. Read more »

This election, same as the last

The songs says:

“History never repeats
I tell myself before I go to sleep
Don’t say the words you might regret
I’ve lost before you know I can’t forget”

But it actually does when it comes to New Zealand elections. ¬† Read more »

The Empire Strikes Back: Official resistance to New Zealand investment in China

The Markets and Banking reporter for the NZ Herald, Christopher Adams has this story

A high-profile Chinese dairy commentator is calling for China’s government to block Fonterra’s investment in Hangzhou-based infant formula maker Beingmate, showing criticism of foreign investment isn’t a purely one-sided affair when it comes to the business relationship between New Zealand and its biggest trading partner.

Foreign investment, particularly from China, has returned to the forefront of public debate in this country since it emerged that Shanghai Pengxin, the owner of the Crafar Farms, wants to purchase the more than 13,000 hectare Lochinver Station in the central North Island.

Opposition parties have opposed the potential sale and NZ First leader Winston Peters has gone as far as vowing to buy back strategic farmland from foreigners.

But it looks like New Zealand is copping a bit of its own medicine in China.

Time for the Labour, Green and NZ First hypocrites to take their medicine.  They are all very happy about Fonterra sticking it to them foreigners, but lo and behold if we were to let them buy stuff here!

It’s simply dog whistle politics that is fueled by the xenophobia that used to be Winston Peter’s personal brand, but has since been adopted by the Greens and Labour as well. ¬† Read more »

Do two Wongs make a Ping Pong?

This is odd

After spending a significant portion of last night’s debate trying to explain why Labour would block the sale of Lochinver Station (a position changed this morning to imply they’d change the law to stop the sale if they could), David Cunliffe’s Twitter account posted a tweet on his visit to the Chinese community in New Lynn, in particular, Cunliffe playing table tennis with them and comparing it to last night’s debate.

Oddly, 22 minutes after posting it, Cunliffe‚Äôs team deleted the tweet and instead posted one about ‚Äėbeautiful Tai Chi‚Äô.

Thanks to Politiwoops, here’s the tweet.

politiwoops

Read more »

Cartoon of the Day

Credit:  SonovaMin

Credit: SonovaMin

What is David Cunliffe’s route to Victory?

The polls are still looking sick for David Cunliffe. He hasn’t managed to get Labour out of the twenties, let alone getting them back to the level that David Shearer had before the Labour caucus gave him the arse.

Cunliffe is holding onto the hope that he can cobble together a coalition of the Greens, New Zealand First, Internet Mana and the Maori Party. Maybe with Peter Dunne involved too as everyone knows Peter doesn’t really care who as long as he is minister.

Cunliffe’s route to victory is a hydra. 

Credit:  SonovaMin

Credit: SonovaMin

Read more »

…and I am unanimous in that!

Screen Shot 2014-08-28 at 4.59.10 pm

Not a very long line behind you though, is there David?

Excluding those holding a knife, that is.