David Farrar

On rape, rape culture and media

When I decided to take Jan Logie and Tania Billingsley to task for their abuse of the media, political and legal processes in regards to the Malaysian diplomat case before the election, I was labelled a rape enabler.  Long term readers will know that’s not correct –  I have a long and consistent history of speaking out against child abuse, domestic abuse and sexual violence.

Then I saw this today.

qeqweqw

Read more »

It’s time for a chat

sycophant-3I note in the comments today in the flag issue that some commenters think I am attacking JohnKey by suggesting his $30 million campaign to change the flag is wrong.

Let me tell you something dear readers…I am sick of this sort of silly accusation that somehow I am against John Key.

I am not nor will ever be in the pay of the National party. I am not even a member.

If you come to this site for a party political broadcast on behalf of the National party, or in the belief that I should operate this site in blind obeisance to St. John Key then you are in the wrong place.

I was brought up surrounded by politicians from Rob Muldoon, to Jim McLay, to Jim Bolger, to Winston Peters, to Jenny Shipley , to Bill English to Don Brash and yes to John Key….plus many supporting characters.

I have witnessed the rise and fall of many politicians. I even helped draft the caucus resolution to chuck Winston Peters from the caucus one windy, rainy Wellington night. They are gone and I am still here.

The one thing that I was brought up with was a healthy disrespect for politicians, and that healthy disrespect was encouraged and nurtured by my mother.

I watched her regularly destroy a politicians argument with reason and logic. She never cared what their position was and never shirked from telling them when they were wrong.

I learned from her that it was ok to go against the ideas and wishes of a party leader. I watched her tell off Muldoon, remonstrate with Aussie Malcolm, mock Jim Bolger and quietly whisper to Jenny Shipley…plus many others.

It is not sacrilege to oppose the flag debate…it is after all a debate…just because I am not on the side of St. John key doesn’t mean I am on the side of evil. I have simply chosen a side of a debate. David Farrar has chosen another side, it doesn’t mean we aren’t friends.

In a vibrant democracy sycophancy must be discouraged, instead reasoned and logical debate must be pursued.

John Key is not infallible, this might be news to some of you, but he isn’t. He actually does make mistakes, and you know what people are allowed to point those out.   Read more »

The Huddle at 1740

newstalkzb

It’s Monday and I’m on ZB with Larry Williams to do The Huddle with pinko attack blogger David Farrar

Our topics will be:

You can listen online via iHeartRadio and normal methods.

As usual I will post the audio in the morning.

unnamed

 

Finally someone addresses the elephant in the room for the left wing

Philip Matthews is a Twitter troll, and a journalist. He is a lot like John Drinnan, just with a smaller newspaper to bleat on it.

His constant harping and screeching about Dirty Politics led me to block him, he like many journalists think Twitter is the real world. He still misses the point of Dirty Politics. It was an attempt to silence, in my case permanently, opposing political voices.

Nonetheless he has written an article in the DomPost addressing the elephant in the room…the left wings very own dirty politics brigade (but without the influence or relevance).

The left wing mistook Twitter and blogging for the real world, and failed in their attempts to get me.

But are they part of the problem rather than the solution….after all Martyn Martin Bradbury established The Daily Blog with union funding to be “a Whaleoil killer”…and failed. He never even got close to his stated goal of a million pagewiews a month before the election.

In a parallel universe, David Cunliffe is the prime minister of New Zealand presiding over a Labour-NZ First minority government in a happy arrangement with the Green Party. Internet Mana, backed by German entrepreneur Kim Dotcom, has a few MPs in Parliament, including veteran activist Hone Harawira.

ACT is already history and former Prime Minister John Key has taken a long holiday in Hawaii.

Wake up. The Left was soundly defeated in the 2014 election.

“I think it’s fair to say we haven’t had dreams in colour since September 20,” says Left-wing activist and blogger Martyn Bradbury.

He freely admits he got it horribly wrong. That was his election prediction above. He “didn’t consider for one moment” that voters would rally to National and that high levels of early voting meant that New Zealanders were backing Key.

Instead, Labour had its worst result since 1922, the Greens slipped below their 2011 peak and Harawira is out of Parliament. “Despondent” is a good word to describe how those on the Left feel.

Read more »

Doug Sellman still whinging

Doug Sellman just doesn’t get it.

He has had a good long whinge in the Sunday Star-Times today.

He seems to think that freedom of speech only applies to him and that he should be free from criticism.share

He also gives Rod Oram a good old reach around, echoing Oram’s claims that I am somehow responsible for suppression freedom of expression when it is him who is seeking to have me, and Carrick Graham and now Katherine Rich silenced.

The fools should really look in the mirror.

But since he keeps on claiming that I am trying to suppress his idea we really should look at those ideas that he is pushing. Then you can see why it is that I push back against idiots like Doug Sellman and the stupid taxpayer funded ideas that they peddle.

And continue to run them we will, especially when idiots like Doug Sellman run off at the mouth claiming:

Does middle NZ care about any of this Robbo?

On Grant Robertson’s website he claims this:

Demonstrating the values that were instilled in him from an early age, Grant has quickly made an impact as a progressive Labour MP. Among the measures that have earned him plaudits are a successful bill to “Mondayise” public holidays, the promotion of ethical investing by state-controlled funds, and his championing of the living wage. In his time in the Labour caucus he has held a number of portfolio responsibilities, including Economic Development, Employment, Skills and Training, and Associate Arts, Culture, Heritage. Grant was Labour’s deputy leader from December 2011 to September 2013.

So basically Grant has done nothing of any real note.

He has appealed to the liberal elite wankocracy by coming up with gay policies that no one in middle New Zealand cares about.

To cap that all off he used his sponsoring of a bill to filibuster in order to prevent, unsuccessfully, the progress of voluntary student unionism. As David Farrar said at the time:

A number of organisations in New Zealand have enabling legislation such as the Scout Association. Another example is the Royal Society of New Zealand – they needed their 1997 legislation updated to incorporate the humanities in their objects and make some governance changes.

Only an MP can introduce a bill into Parliament so a private body needs to find an MP to agree to promote their bill and steer it through the House. They will often ask the local MP, but it can be any MP. And if the MP agrees, they have basically a duty of care to that organisation to use their best efforts to get that law changed. This is normally very easy, as these changes are rarely controversial.

The Royal Society of New Zealand Amendment Bill was introduced in September 2010. It should have passed into law in early 2011. but instead it remains stuck on committee stage and now can not pass before the election.   Read more »

Another Fabian socialist using his paper to try to silence free speech

According to Rod Oram I am responsible for the ending of society and what it could have been because I call crusading scientists to account.

This Fabian socialist ignores the fact ( while he crusades on Nicky Hager’s behalf ) that a journalist was hacked and crimes were committed by the very people he is now crying a river of tears for.

He claims that I am trying to suppress debate.

Is free and rigorous debate increasingly suppressed in New Zealand?

No, says, John Roughan, John Key’s biographer and a New Zealand Herald editorial writer, in his article available at http://bit.ly/Roughan

Yes, says, Nicky Hager, investigative journalist. He laid out chapter and verse in a recent article in the UK’s Guardian (http://bit.ly/Hager), as he did in his book Dirty Politics. His piece triggered Roughan’s blistering response.

I say yes.  Suppression of evidence, ideas and debate, in ways subtle and now increasingly brutal, is my experience as a business journalist in New Zealand. It is no consolation we are just a micro example of an accelerating trend worldwide.

Far from suppressing debate I am actually encouraging it. I am actually providing the other side of the debate. In order to have a debate one must have two sides, but all too often the Orams of this world and the so-called researchers he is defending don’t want a debate. They want their story only told…and when you push back against them they cry out that you are trying to suppress them.

The whole premise behind ‘Dirty Politics’, as stated by the hacker and his mouthpiece Nicky Hager was to “shut down” the network of people who were challenging their pals. Yes they used the words “shut down”. In other words it is they who have decided that the debate must be suppressed, that illegal means, foul means, criminal means must be used to justify the ends.

Let me give you two examples from my work last week. At the Population Health Congress very good experts from many science and other professional disciplines were wrestling with the escalating issue of childhood obesity, alcoholism, and many other extremely complex societal issues.

But many of them know they are taking great professional and personal risks to do this critical work. They are painfully aware of the ruthless way Cameron Slater, Carrick Graham and others have tried to destroy Prof Doug Sellman, director of the University of Otago’s National Addiction Centre.

The facts of their despicable acts were laid bare in Dirty Politics. It was just one of many such campaigns they continue to run.

Read more »

Why is it Kiwiblog has the best posts when Farrar is away?

Lifestyle, arts and travel blogger David Farrar is away again.

Kiwiblog has again reverted to a blog of David’s mid-life crisis and travels.

Not content with his own travel blogging, he also now has guest travel blog posts.

However he does have a guest post from Kiwi in America that is very good. Why is it Kiwiblog’s best posts are while he is away?

Regular readers of Kiwiblog will recall my lengthy essay posted on Easter Friday about the recent history of Labour; some of it based on my time as an activist there until the mid 90’s attempting to explain Labour’s present day conundrum.

In a nutshell it said that an attempt by the left of the party to seize permanent control of Labour after the massive post Rogernomics ructions under the leadership of Helen Clark, led to a gradual purging of activists from the centrist and right wings of the party. Clark, and her followers in the Head Office and regional hierarchies, ensured the selection of candidates in winnable electorate seats (and after the introduction of MMP, also the party list) that not only ensured she could topple then leader Mike Moore after the 1993 election but also cemented her power base inside Labour guaranteeing her an unchallenged 15 year reign as Labour’s leader. This handed power in the party to an increasingly narrow base of sector and interest groups such as academics, trade unions, progressive feminists and the rainbow coalition gradually driving out activists who were more likely to be white, male, socially conservative, small business owners and church going people of faith. After Labour’s 2008 election defeat, former members of the harder left New Labour Party, homeless after the dissolution of the Alliance, the demise of Anderton’s Progressives and the rise of the Greens, began to come back to Labour assisting in the movement of the party more to the left.

This trend culminated in the amendment to Labour’s Constitution at its 2012 Annual Conference giving 40% of the vote for Party Leader to the party membership and 20% to the affiliated unions leaving only 40% in the hands of the Parliamentary caucus. This new formula enabled David Cunliffe to win the first full leadership primary in 2013 despite having only minority support in caucus – the first time this had ever happened in Labour’s history. The result of his elevation to the leadership was Labour’s third successive and even more disastrous defeat.

When you drive out of the party its more centrist activists, you leave a vacuum that has been filled by harder left activists. When these same activists, alongside the more traditionally left wing trade union leadership, have control of the party’s candidate selections, its policy formation and now the election of its leader, over time you end up with a party, candidates and policies that no longer appeal to middle NZ and a party that is no longer the broad church it used to be. The party may be truer to its left wing principles but it now produces candidates, policies and campaigning rhetoric out of step with the aspirations of floating middle NZ voters that decide elections. National’s moderate centrist direction under John Key has become the natural repository for various key demographic groups that once used to strongly vote Labour and accordingly, Labour has ended up falling further behind National in each subsequent election post its 2008 defeat culminating in its second lowest vote this election since its formation in 1916!

Labour is now undertaking yet another review of why it was defeated and another likely more bruising leadership primary.

Read more »

Sheik Mohammed comments on ISIS

 

Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum is the current ruler of Dubai and he has penned an opinion piece on ISIS.

That alone makes me want to read it. A Middle East leader of a vibrant modern nation commenting on ISIS…its worth a read in full.

The global financial crisis taught the world how profoundly interdependent our economies have become. In today’s crisis of extremism, we must recognize that we are just as interdependent for our security, as is clear in the current struggle to defeat ISIS.

If we are to prevent ISIS from teaching us this lesson the hard way, we must acknowledge that we cannot extinguish the fires of fanaticism by force alone. The world must unite behind a holistic drive to discredit the ideology that gives extremists their power, and to restore hope and dignity to those whom they would recruit.

ISIS certainly can – and will – be defeated militarily by the international coalition that is now assembling and which the UAE is actively supporting. But military containment is only a partial solution. Lasting peace requires three other ingredients: winning the battle of ideas; upgrading weak governance; and supporting grassroots human development.

Such a solution must begin with concerted international political will. Not a single politician in North America, Europe, Africa, or Asia can afford to ignore events in the Middle East. A globalized threat requires a globalized response. Everyone will feel the heat, because such flames know no borders; indeed, ISIS has recruited members of at least 80 nationalities.

Read more »

Would people who have no knowledge of military matters stop making silly suggestions

SAS-Baddass

NZSAS after operation in Kabul to sort out some Taliban ratbags

David Farrar opines about Vernon Small’s article that New Zealand sends military transport and not our highly skilled SAS to Syria and Iraq.

But first lets address Small’s report.

Prime Minister John Key says New Zealand could offer the airforce’s “airlift capacity” as part of a contribution to the international military action against Islamic State (IS) militants.

The extremist Islamic group, also known as Isil, and Isis, has rapidly moved to control and destabilise Iraq, sweeping in from Syria in the north. The group has beheaded aid workers, journalists and carried out crucifixions and mass executions.

Key is also signalling that Cabinet will tomorrow take the first step towards cracking down on New Zealanders who go to fight alongside IS, by extending the time passports can be cancelled and by making fighting with IS an explicit criminal act.

Speaking on TV One’s Q+A programme, Key said a range of options were being considered for New Zealand involvement in the IS conflict but more work was needed before a final decision.

Any action should be “useful, practical and work”, he said. That could range from humanitarian action, which was already under way, and include military options such as training, “to ultimately people who would be there right on the front line”.

“The last bit is some sort of military support, but not necessarily people on the ground, so it could be airlift capability.”

Let’s look at the stupidity of that suggestion, from Key and reported by Vernon Small.   Read more »