David Farrar

Farrar keeps coming good

Arts, Travel & Lifestyle blogger David Farrar seems to have his mojo back and is in top form although it is still not yet enough to get back into the VRWC just yet.

Farrar-tease

Yes Pinko, he would make a very good National MP for Northland but unfortunately he is a bit too right wing for the wet wing of National.

Meanwhile Farrar has also made (which isn’t that hard) the NZ Herald’s media writer John Drinnan look like a complete doofus.    Read more »

Andrew Sullivan decides to quit blogging

One of my big influencers in blogging has decided to quit after 15 years.

One of the things I’ve always tried to do at the Dish is to be up-front with readers. This sometimes means grotesque over-sharing; sometimes it means I write imprudent arguments I have to withdraw; sometimes it just means a monthly update on our revenues and subscriptions; and sometimes I stumble onto something actually interesting. But when you write every day for readers for years and years, as I’ve done, there’s not much left to hide. And that’s why, before our annual auto-renewals, I want to let you know I’ve decided to stop blogging in the near future.

Why? Two reasons. The first is one I hope anyone can understand: although it has been the most rewarding experience in my writing career, I’ve now been blogging daily for fifteen years straight (well kinda straight). That’s long enough to do any single job. In some ways, it’s as simple as that. There comes a time when you have to move on to new things, shake your world up, or recognize before you crash that burn-out does happen.

The second is that I am saturated in digital life and I want to return to the actual world again. I’m a human being before I am a writer; and a writer before I am a blogger, and although it’s been a joy and a privilege to have helped pioneer a genuinely new form of writing, I yearn for other, older forms. I want to read again, slowly, carefully. I want to absorb a difficult book and walk around in my own thoughts with it for a while. I want to have an idea and let it slowly take shape, rather than be instantly blogged. I want to write long essays that can answer more deeply and subtly the many questions that the Dish years have presented to me. I want to write a book.

I want to spend some real time with my parents, while I still have them, with my husband, who is too often a ‘blog-widow’, my sister and brother, my niece and nephews, and rekindle the friendships that I have simply had to let wither because I’m always tied to the blog. And I want to stay healthy. I’ve had increasing health challenges these past few years. They’re not HIV-related; my doctor tells me they’re simply a result of fifteen years of daily, hourly, always-on-deadline stress. These past few weeks were particularly rough – and finally forced me to get real.

Read more »

Farrar is back in the saddle, tickles up Catton in open letter

Arts, Travel & Lifestyle blogger David Farrar is back from his hectic travel schedule to sledge Eleanor Catton for her silly comments made to a bunch of Indian luvvies.

Fortunately when not travelling or watching plays because someone has given him a free ticket our pinko mate has moments of political brilliance, and today is one of those days.

He tells Catton to put her money where her mouth is.

Also I noted last year you said you would be happy to taxed at 40% to help young Kiwis. You may be unaware of this, but you can voluntarily pay more tax than you are obliged to. Just calculate the extra 7% on your income and send it to The Treasury, 1 The Terrace, Wellington and I am sure they will send you a receipt.

Read more »

Trotter gets a bit wonky with his thinking

Chris Trotter looks at Winston Peters and at John Key.

It’s a good article but gets some things dreadfully wrong.

The successful populist politician’s response will always echo that of Alexandre Ledru-Rollin, one of the leaders of the February Revolution of 1848 in France: “There go the people. I must follow them, for I am their leader.”

To carry off this leading-by-following trick, the populist politician requires both a vigilant eye and an unusually sensitive ear. In present-day New Zealand, for example, only a blind, deaf and extremely dumb populist would assume that to stay behind the rage he has only to hurl abuse at John Key’s government. All he would demonstrate by such tactics is how thoroughly he has missed the fact that John Key is, himself, an extremely accomplished populist leader. What’s more, John Key, unlike Alexandre Ledru-Rollin, has no need to go running after the crowds. Thanks to his pollster, David Farrar, and focus-group supremo, Mark Textor, the Prime Minister knows exactly where the people are going. That’s why he’s so often to be found parked there, waiting for them to arrive.

David Farrar is probably New Zealand’s best pollster…he keeps John Key and Steven Joyce focussed.

Though the article is wrong and shows it clearly in this statement.

Mr Key’s Cabinet’s slavish adherence to neoliberal ideology has meant that economic and social policies that could have really assisted the “average Kiwi” are consistently ruled out of contention

Read more »

Who is Andrew Little? – The EPMU Years

Andrew Little’s claim that he is a leader is based around his years at the EPMU. He spent 19 years in the union movement, and is very proud of his achievements at the EPMU.

Our pinko mate Farrar knows union history backwards and wrote the following in 2009:

Andrew became the union’s general counsel in 1997, then the assistant national secretary and next year will celebrate ten years as national secretary of the EPMU.

For many years Andrew has also been on the National Council of the Labour Party, representing the union affiliates who provide much of the money and manpower to Labour in exchange for bulk voting rights at conferences.

In his Palmerston North campaign speech he made the following claim.

I am standing for the Labour Party Leadership for two principal reasons. Firstly I have led significant change in a large organisation. When I took over at the EPMU, our largest private sector union, we were an organisation in three parts.    Read more »

No, it’s the benefit of having an accurate pollster on the payroll

Karl du Fresne thinks that John Key is on drugs:

I have never met John Key, but like anyone who follows politics I’ve been able to observe him via the media. And after studying him carefully, I think I now realise the explanation for much of his behaviour. He’s on drugs.

Not the illegal kind, I should stress, but the mood-calming type that doctors prescribe. This may sound flippant, but consider the following.

In the 2014 election campaign, Key was subjected to possibly the most sustained media offensive faced by any prime minister in New Zealand history. Day after day he was tackled by an aggressive media pack trying to trap him on dirty politics, illicit surveillance and other touchy issues.

His answers were often unsatisfactory, which served only to ramp up the media frenzy. But through it all, he appeared supernaturally imperturbable. He patiently batted away reporters’ questions and accusations with his familiar bland inscrutability. There were no meltdowns, no hissy fits, no petulant walkouts.

This was downright unnatural. No politician should be that unflappable. He can have achieved it only by the ingestion of large amounts – indeed, industrial quantities – of tranquillisers.

Read more »

Looks like David Farrar is getting special help to clean up his Dirty Politics

unnamed

 

– Tipline

Meme/Caption contest

B7IkffkIcAAXr4N

Theatre, travel, fitness and lifestyle blogger David Farrar has been traipsing around Africa.  Thought I’d give you the chance to provide a caption.   Do it here, then post the result in the comments.   Read more »

Mark Steyn blasts media and many outlets cower in the face of terrorism

Mark Steyn wishes that the media would try at least to find their testicles.

The Sunday Star-Times gets a dishonourable mention in the segment.

We saw yesterday the cowardice of the NZ Herald in publishing only those Charlie Hebdo cartoons that offend politicians, Christians and Jews, but not a single one that might offend a muslim.

David Farrar found his courage though, which puts the New Zealand media to shame, and this same attitude seems to prevail worldwide where legacy media lack courage and new media exhibit it in spades.

With few exceptions, it has been digital outlets like The Huffington Post, The Daily Beast, Business Insider, BuzzFeed, Vox, and Slate that have exercised their constitutional right by republishing the cartoons that are thought to be the basis for the attacks. In contrast, many “legacy” organizations, from CNN, to The Washington Post, to The New York Times, largely withheld the images. In explaining its decision not to distribute any of the images, the AP’s spokesman, Paul Colford, was quoted as saying, “It’s been our policy for years that we refrain from moving deliberately provocative images.” Bloomberg, meanwhile, published a slideshow that included many of the incendiary covers.  Read more »

Capitulation by the NZ Herald

Despite a front page cartoon echoing The Independent’s own cartoon, the NZ Herald has actually capitulated to Islamic terrorism today.

Even David Farrar managed to post Charlie Hebdo cartoons today.

But what does the NZ Herald do despite claiming solidarity with Charlie Hebdo?

They capitulate. Publishing cartoons but none of the ones deemed so offensive to easily outraged Islamic fanatics.

A reader notes:

I noticed today that the Herald had published cartoons from Charlie Hebdo.

I was surprised at their bravery as most MSM are afraid to publish these due to the fear of Islam. I then looked at them and noticed that their were no cartoons about Islam in their selection and many were against the anti-immigration movement.

Surely they should have shown a varied selection of their cartoons including anti-Islamic ones?

Self-censorship again?    Read more »