David Fisher

Cameron, WHALEOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOIL, Slateeeeeeerrrrrrr

I thought it would be cool to give people some vicarious pleasure by having someone else beat the crap out of me on their behalf.  Steve Kilgallon writes:

1422125932188

Cameron Slater says he knows he sells newspapers, so now he’s ready to sell pay-per-view television – even if he knows the viewers might be switching on to watch him get knocked out.

The controversial Whale Oil blogger and the subject of the Dirty Politics scandal will make his ring debut in Christchurch on March 28, against former New Zealand test cricketer Jesse Ryder.

And if the fight goes well, Slater has a list of opponents he would like to meet next – headed by Dirty Politics author Nicky Hager, television host John Campbell and New Zealand Herald journalists David Fisher and Matt Nippert. Read more »

I’ve figured it out: “Businessman” is a new journalistic euphemism

maxresdefault

You know how “emotional and tired” means “drunk”, and “they are not looking for anyone, and the death has been referred to the coroner” means “suicide”.

Rob Muldoon was emotional and tired when he called the 1984 snap election, if you recall. ¬† Read more »

Kim Dotcom’s new cyber interest: Sarah Eris Torrent

Geez.  I wonder  why New Zealand official stopped her at the border for a 7 hour interview before heading off to be with a man known for cyber crimes and on extradition charges to face criminal charges of racketeering and money laundering?

The following images came from Torrent’s Facebook page.

10689471_361555437357836_175543812485932181_n

Read more »

NZ Herald, RIP

Once_Were_Journalists_poste

Tweets of the Day

The NZ Herald having to use an editorial to explain away their cowardice after week of spankings using their own articles to highlight their hypocrisy is astonishing in the first place.

Having lawyer Graeme Edgeler call them out again is hilarious.

edge-tweet

This is an example of the left-wing and their view of freedom of expression…violence.

duckpunch

Both of those tweets expose the left-wing and media hypocrisy when it comes to violence, freedom of expression and freedom of speech. ¬† Read more »

From the passenger seat: Who created the monster?

Cameron-Slater-Bugby Pete

Almost ten years ago, a fairly unknown guy called Cameron Slater was spiraling down.  Financially.  Emotionally.  Pretty much everything he had touched had come to nothing.

He spent most of his days in bed. ¬†When he didn’t, he was surfing the Internet, or listening to talkback radio getting increasingly annoyed at the “commentators” who were talking rubbish.

Someone suggested he start a blog, more as therapy as anything else.   On day one, nobody knows you exist.  The first ever article you ever write is only read by you, and perhaps a few close friends.

How did we get to the point where this blog became the focal point through which a whole national election progressed?

Ten years ago, would anyone have guessed a Prime Minister would have to issue a written apology, or parliament would have this blog and Cameron Slater at the centre of its discussions for months on end?

Read more »

Facts don’t matter to the media

One of the smartest men alive, Thomas Sowell, has an opinion piece at Townhall.com about how the media, and some politicians create then win from promoting a mob mentality, often without any facts at all, or in many cases just making stuff up.

He discusses the recent cases of Trayvon Martin, Michael Brown and Eric Garner, plus the older case of Rodney King. All case that were portrayed wrongly by the media, and then pounced upon by politicians or commentators like Al Sharpton in order to promote their own race based agenda. Before everyone gets all uppity, you might not be aware that Thomas Sowell is black.

He even points out the inconsistencies (probably deliberate) of the media.

Incidentally, did you know that, during this same period when riots, looting and arson have been raging, a black policeman in Alabama shot and killed an unarmed white teenager — and was cleared by a grand jury? Probably not, if you depend on the mainstream media for your news.

Sowell concludes:

The media do not merely ignore facts, they suppress facts. Millions of people saw the videotape of the beating of Rodney King. But they saw only a fraction of that tape because the media left out the rest, which showed Rodney King — another huge man — resisting arrest and refusing to be handcuffed, so that he could be searched.

Television viewers did not get to see the other black men in the same vehicle that Rodney King was driving recklessly. Those other black men were not beaten. And the grand jury got to see the whole video, after which they acquitted the police — and the media then published the jurors’ home addresses.

Such media retribution against people they don’t like is part of a growing lynch mob mentality. The black witnesses in Missouri, whose testimony confirmed what the police officer said, expressed fears for their own safety for telling what the physical evidence showed was the truth. ¬†¬† Read more »

I’ve got bad news for Bryce Edwards

Bryce Edwards must have hit the crack pipe before writing his last woeful column of the year.

Apparently National had a horror year…or so the headline screams.

Yes, John Key’s National Government won a spectacular third term victory. And yesterday the Herald gave the reasons that National can be positive about its achievements – see the editorial, Govt comes out on top in colourful year.

And nearly every political journalist has awarded John Key the title of Politician of the Year – see, for example, Patrick Gower’s Politician of the Year.

But, it was still an incredibly torrid year for National, and even the PM pointed to the election campaign as one of his low moments of the year – see TV3’s Key found campaign ‘a low-light’ for 2014.

Tracy Watkins also stresses that it’s been a terrible year for the National Government: ‘His government was assaulted on every front with scandal, trouble and controversy. Ministers resigned, his coalition allies ended the year diminished, and he ended the year looking evasive and tarnished by his links to dirty tricks and shock jock blogger WhaleOil’ – see: One clear winner, plenty of dashed hopes.

Not only did the election campaign take its toll, but as I pointed out recently in another column, The downfall of John Key, the challenges and allegations of Dirty Politics were really starting to bite after the election. See also, A year of (neverending) Dirty Politics.

Even Matthew Hooton thinks the Government has suffered, especially since their election victory, and he details National’s incredibly arrogant behaviour since the election, pointing to the main offenders: John Key, Christopher Finlayson, and Gerry Brownlee – see: For John Key: summer of reflection please (paywalled).

Likewise, Duncan Garner says that although Key deserves to be the ‘politician of the year’, ‘The first few months of the new regime have been largely underwhelming. Not telling the truth about his contact with attack blogger WhaleOil hurt the prime minister. It was a royal stuff-up and he admits this privately’ – see: Key my politician of the year, but now for the third-term blues. Garner believes the Key’s reputation is on the decline: ‘It’s happening for Key, slowly. His jokes don’t seem as funny. He looks more haunted and hunted these days’.

Read more »

Hacking and Double Standards in the media

Everyone know that I was hacked but a gutless coward who skulks in the shadows.

Our media as a result of the hack treated the conduit, Nicky Hager as a hero, pursued me, my friends and hounded people out of jobs.

We had done noting wrong, nothing illegal and yet they pursued us. We were vilified in the media, in social media and yet the fact remains that we did nothing wrong.

Our only ‘crime’ was to have differing political views to the hacker, to Nicky Hager and to the haters who vilified us.

Those same investigative journalists have never once attempted to investigate who the hacker was, who was involved or why they did it. There was zero balance., it was just a feeding frenzy in an attempt to unseat a popular government.

Now they are speaking at hacking conferences making themselves complicit in the hack.

Simon Brew at Den of Geek talks about the Sony hack and the lack of ethics from news outlets and journalists who have revelled in the hack.

Then, we’re at the Sony hack. This wasn’t a leak of a set picture, or a tip off from a source. This was people hacking into a company’s servers, stealing private information, and making it available without their consent. Thus, not only have certain films leaked, but so have documents relating to an assortment of Sony projects. These involve major franchises and a lot of human beings.

The major news outlets couldn’t wait to delve through them and run the stories.

Let’s make no bones about this either: there were some juicy, major stories in there. Huge ones in some instances. However, I can’t shake the feeling that they were obtained by theft. That outlets such as the Wall Street Journal, Variety and The Hollywood Reporter – to name just a handful – are, ultimately, benefitting from stolen property, and feeding on the spoils of it. Some are reporting it as a leak. But it’s not a leak. It’s an illegal hack. Bluntly, a theft.¬† Read more »

Not the best blog then?

In spite of the tiresome triumvirate of Russel Norman, David Fisher and Giovanni Tiso doing their best, in their own ways, to damage the Whaleoil Brand yesterday, this blog had already locked in the votes, and no amount of intimidation was going to persuade Netguide’s Sean Mitchell to take action.

Sean Mitchell has been one of the very few to stand strong against the immense pressure from the left of politics and the usual suspects in the media. Where John Key has wavered, Sean told them all to go away. ¬†The voting process is clear – it’s out of his hands, and if hundreds of thousands of people vote for Whaleoil to win a Netguide, why would he listen to half a dozen people with an agenda?

Onya Sean.

Yes, the Netguide awards are a brute force popularity contest.  Those with the most audience votes win the award.

Not sure if that actually sinks in with Messrs Norman, Fisher, Tiso and others like Little, Smalley and other critics.  A bit like the National Party, I guess, in the sense that they are also the most popular political party, by popular vote.   It seems the opponents are unwilling to accept reality.

By telling everyone that I am evil, and that Whaleoil doesn’t deserve this recognition, you are also telling all our readers and supporters that their judgement is wrong. ¬†They are stupid, they are evil, they are nasty, they are to be despised.

And I can tell you this much – it doesn’t work that way.

You may, theoretically turn me into a monster in the eyes of others, if you do the job right – but this specific award was won because our¬†readers made it happen. ¬† Read more »