David Parker

A stupid policy from a stupid, stupid man

Paul Henry comments on Labour’s new transport policy?

Add to that Labour also released their keep cyclists safe policy yesterday…hmmm…quite how moving trucks to the left closer to cyclists is going to aid that policy is beyond me.

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And then there is the issue with the Auckland Harbour Bridge issue, where trucks are forbidden to use the outside lanes due to cracks on the clip ons. Sw now, under Labour’s policy the trucks will all have to travel in the left hand lanes and then transition to the inside lanes somewhere in the vicinity of spaghetti junction so they comply with NZTA requirements for trucks to travel up the centre lanes of the bridge.

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Twitter as a political tool

Matthew Beveridge appeared on The Nation to discuss Twitter as a political tool.

He makes the follow extra observations:

1) If you are going to be on social media: Do it, do it properly or go home. There is no point starting a Twitter account and not doing anything with it. There are a number of MPs who are guilty of this, Ian McKelvie, David Parker, Mark Mitchell (though he is now making an effort), Eugenie Sage.  They all have accounts with very low numbers of Tweets. Some with as little as 1. To me, going to the effort of starting an account, adding a profile photo and the like, then not using it is the same as walking away from a conversation. It looks like you aren’t interested in hearing what people have to say. So if you are a political candidate or MP and you are thinking about starting a social media account, make sure you are willing to put in the effort to do it properly, or don’t come out to play.

Mostly they should not come out to play. Most are useless at it and I still don’t believe that any meaningful engagement occurs.   Read more »

Labour MPs get no say in cold shouldering the Green Party

Credit: SonovaMin

Credit: SonovaMin

If you’re David Cunliffe, and you rise to the controls of Labour Party power that essentially allows you to become party leader which results in you having about a third of the support of your colleagues, how can you get anything done democratically?

You can’t.  Not if you don’t want to get voted down every time.

Labour has rejected a proposal from the Greens to work together as an alternative government, with the larger party’s leadership saying it will focus on maximising its own votes.

Labour’s deputy leader David Parker says the decision to dismiss the proposal was made by the leadership group.   Read more »

Sledge of the Day: Parker loses the plot and Bill English nails him

David Parker went on a wonky jihad yesterday in parliament attempting to re-litigate the 1975 election and superannuation and got dealt to by Bill English.

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Cartoon of the Day

Credit:  SonovaMin

Credit: SonovaMin

Labour’s two face Kiwisaver messages

Here is what David Cunliffe said on 14 March 2014 about KiwiSaver:

“We will make KiwiSaver universal.

Every employee will contribute to their KiwiSaver account, not only ensuring financial security for New Zealanders in old age, but also making a significant boost to capital available for investment now. We have seen the success of this across the Tasman. I want to replicate that, and I know I am supported in that goal by many New Zealand businesses.”

Sounds promising…compulsory Kiwisaver (that’s what universal means), but will every employee have to contribute?  Well not exactly.

This is what David Parker said just a fortnight later on 28 March 2014:

“It [compulsion] would apply to all employees, exempting only the self-employed and those with hardship, although very high earners with sufficient savings will also be exempt, Labour’s finance spokesman David Parker says.” 

Interesting…the leader says one thing but the finance spokesman and deputy leader says something quite different.  Read more »

Watkins on the Cunliffe schemozzle

Tracy Watkins has an opinion piece today about “The Enigma of Cunliffe“.

The great enigma about David Cunliffe has always been how someone so smart managed to make so many enemies among his own colleagues.

He is by many accounts a caring boss and doesn’t take himself so seriously that he can’t laugh at himself.

The schemozzle surrounding the Labour leader in recent days probably helps explain the unease of those among his colleagues who opposed his leadership bid.  Cunliffe’s biggest critics have always complained about a lack of self awareness as his potentially fatal flaw.

That is what causes him to swing from a caricature of himself as a gun-slinging troubleshooter to working class hero, who forgets along the way that he also lives in one of Auckland’s swankiest suburbs, Herne Bay.

It may also be what lies at the root of his failure to realise the lack of transparency around donations to his leadership campaign and declaration of financial interests was a grenade waiting to go off.  Read more »

Vernon Small on Labour’s “issues”

Yesterday Vernon Small wrote about the biggest issue facing Labour ahead of this year’s election.

Well the biggest problem after the issue with their tits leader….rejuvenation…or rather the lack of it.

 In politics rejuvenation rates alongside succession planning. Both are easy catchcries and generally seen as “a good thing”.

In reality they are a type of parliamentary Nimby-ism – nice to have if it is someone else who is vacating a seat, and fine as long as you are not the leader whose replacement is being groomed.

On the National side of the aisle rejuvenation is in full swing. At last count 14 MPs have either gone or are going out of a caucus of 59. It is generally accepted as a worthwhile and necessary refreshment of the party. Certainly it is being handled well and without any overt bloodletting. No dummies have been spat in the remaking of the National caucus.

Of course if the polls were different it would be a different story. Shave a theoretical five points off the Government and give it to the Opposition and the narrative might be akin to the “rats leaving a sinking ship” theme that Labour leader David Cunliffe has tried to get up.

But that just looks lame when the last three polls had National harvesting enough support to govern alone.  Read more »

Labour and Greens keeping power policy details secret

Labour and the Greens want you to trust them to run the country.

They want you to believe the brochures, the tweets, the Facebook messages and policy headlines but they don’t want you to know the precise details of their doomed to fail power policy.

Investors wanting more certainty around Labour-Greens policy for overhauling the electricity sector before the election appear to be out of luck.

The parties released plans for radically restructuring the industry shortly before the float of Mighty River Power in May last year and their policy has hung over the partial privatisation programme since.

At an energy industry conference yesterday the architects of the policy, Labour finance spokesman David Parker and Greens co-leader Russel Norman, restated the broad principles of the NZ Power plans.

“We don’t plan to release much further detail before the election,” said Norman after a panel discussion at the Downstream conference in Auckland.

“We’ve released a lot more detail than the National Party did before the Bradford reforms.”

In government the parties would be in a much better position to develop policy using the bureaucracy at their disposal, Norman said.  Read more »

Cartoon of the Day

Credit: SonovaMin

Credit: SonovaMin