Dishonesty

On yer bike Brown

Len on a bike.  Credit: Sarah Ivey

Len on a bike. Credit: Sarah Ivey

Len took the train once.   Read more »

But why was he carrying that much around?

Police-watch-a-train-near-Aasta-central-Norway.-AFP

Two Norwegian teens returned 467,200 kroner (some 62,000 euros, $81,500) they found left on a train by an elderly passenger, Norwegian media reported Thursday.

The pair found the treasure Wednesday in a bag left on the seat of a train running between Oslo and a small town in southeastern Norway.

“When I opened the bag, the first thing I saw were these wads and wads of bills,” one of the teens, identified as 16-year-old Bendik, told local daily Vestby Avis.

“My first thought was to call the police,” he said.

After looking in the bag more closely, the good samaritans found the passport of its owner, a man in his 70s who was expected to pick up his money from the police on Thursday.

Police said they did not suspect any foul play behind the man’s huge quantity of cash, and said they did not know if the two teenagers had been rewarded for their honesty.

This on the same day where a Kiwi survey showed that only 1 in 3 kiwis would hand back $10 that was given to them by mistake by a cashier.

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A little legal problem for Keith and Ira

Contrary to what David Farrar thinks I think Ira Bailey and Keith Ng have a little problem.

The Register certainly thinks so:

Ng himself, however, has come under criticism for his voracious appetite for grabbing files to prove his point. As his blog post shows, Ng took a look at files for contractor invoices, hours worked, medical information, debt collection, fraud investigation. He notes that “I sorted through 3,500 invoices … about half of what I obtained”.

While demonstrating that the network was unsecured represents a considerable service to the public, not knowing when to stop has probably put the blogger well on the wrong side of the law. Over atNational Business Review there’s some lawyerly punch and counterpunch about whether, in fact, Ng went so far he’s at risk of jail under New Zealand’s Crimes Act, even though “prosecution guidelines meant action was unlikely to be taken”.

And the relevant legislation:

Crimes Act 1961

249 Accessing computer system for dishonest purpose

(1)Every one is liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding 7 years who, directly or indirectly, accesses any computer system and thereby, dishonestly or by deception, and without claim of right,—

(a) obtains any property, privilege, service, pecuniary advantage, benefit, or valuable consideration; or
(b) causes loss to any other person.

(2) Every one is liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding 5 years who, directly or indirectly, accesses any computer system with intent, dishonestly or by deception, and without claim of right,—

(a) to obtain any property, privilege, service, pecuniary advantage, benefit, or valuable consideration; or
(b) to cause loss to any other person.

(3) In this section, deception has the same meaning as in section 240(2).