Doping

Busted Drug Cheat having a Sook

via The Guardian

Photograph: Michael Paulsen/AP via The Guardian

Lance Armstrong complains of ‘massive personal loss’ in doping fall-out…

The United States Anti-Doping Agency had accused Armstrong of conducting “the most sophisticated, professionalised and successful doping programme sport has ever seen” and Armstrong said he would be prepared to take any punishment as long as it was on a level playing field: “If everyone gets the death penalty, then I’ll take the death penalty.   Read more »

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How your computer and Lance Armstrong are related

Sports Talk: NRL round 1

Round one of the NRL season kicks off in just a few hours tonight, unfortunately it will merely be an afterthought because of the controversy surrounding the Cronulla Sharks. At this stage the outlook for the Sharks doesn’t look good. Up to 14 players may have used a sports supplement that contained a banned substance. Players were told on Tuesday they had 48 hours to accept a 6 month voluntary suspension if they had used the banned drug, knowingly or otherwise, or face a 2 year ban if investigated and found guilty by ASADA.

“Richard Redman is very experienced and what he would be advising the players would be that – if they were involved and if they know that they were involved – that they should come forward and receive a mitigation in that penalty,” Ings told Fox Sports.

“If they wait, they could get a two-year ban.

“Anti-doping is a very, very complicated area and Richard Redman, I’d say, would be the best-credentialed lawyer in the anti-doping space in Australia.”

Ings said there was a very clear process followed by ASADA in attempting to weed out drug cheats.

“What the players need to realize is that this is a house of cards and, if they are involved in doping, there’ll be someone who will break ranks and people who break ranks are going to get the credit and the reduced penalty,” said Ings.

He reiterated that ignorance was no defense amid speculation Cronulla players could sue the club if suspended, saying they had taken supplements provided by an employee of the club in good faith. Read more »

I’m sure he did, liars usually do

Lance Armstrong has finally, sort of admitted to be a lying, cheating scum bag. And some of former team mates think he sounded sorry…of course he can easily sound sorry sitting on the millions he won by being a lying, cheating, doping scumbag…but hey…at least he sounded sorry.

Some of Lance Armstrong’s former teammates view his doping confession as an important step in helping cycling restore its damaged credibility, while his former rivals are largely indifferent to his admission of cheating.

After long refuting allegations of drug cheating, Armstrong admitted in an interview with Oprah Winfrey to using the blood-booster EPO, testosterone, and to having blood doped during his seven straight Tour wins from 1999-2005.

He has since been stripped of all those titles and banned from competing for life following a US Anti-Doping Agency report exposing the extent of his doping.  Read more »

Really? Well Shit, I had No Idea…

Looks like the drugs cheat denier may have come clean in his interview with Oprah Winfrey today:

Lance Armstrong, who for years vehemently denied cheating while winning a record seven Tours de France, told Oprah Winfrey that he used performance-enhancing drugs to advance his cycling career, according to media reports.

ABC News and USA Today, citing unnamed sources, reported Monday night that the former cyclist finally admitted to using steroids during an interview he and Winfrey taped Monday night in Armstrong’s hometown of Austin, Texas. Read more »

Drug Cheat

Lance Armstrong is a serial drug cheat. Evidence of his cheating is now a veritable avalanche:

[T]he evidence revealed “conclusive and undeniable proof that brings to the light of day for the first time this systemic, sustained and highly professionalized team-run doping conspiracy.”

The evidence against Armstrong features financial payments, e-mails, scientific analyses and laboratory test results that show Armstrong doped and was the kingpin of the doping conspiracy, the agency said. Several years of Armstrong’s blood values showed evidence of doping, the report said.

“It’s shocking, it’s disappointing,” said Travis Tygart, chief executive of the antidoping agency. “But we did our job.”

Worse it was a state funded team-run doping conspiracy.

While the criminal investigation is no more, an inquiry by the Department of Justice is continuing, sparked by Landis’s filing a federal whistle-blower lawsuit charging that Armstrong and the team management defrauded the government by using taxpayer dollars to finance the squad’s doping program.

He claimed that Armstrong and the team management were aware of the widespread doping on the team when the squad’s contract with the Postal Service clearly stated that any doping would constitute default of their agreement, said two people with knowledge of the case. Those people did not want their names published because the case is still under seal.

Landis filed the lawsuit under the False Claims Act, the people with knowledge of the matter said, and those suits give citizens the right and financial incentive to bring lawsuits on the government’s behalf.

If the government decides to join the lawsuit and recovers any money because of it, Landis will be eligible to receive a percentage of the money.

It is thought that Landis could scalp back around 30%.

The Freak Olympics? Ctd

ᔥ The Atlantic

Forget performance enhancing drugs, how about genetically modified athletes? Forget the pretence…let’s have the Freak Olympics with no restrictions at all…it would be freakin’ awesome:

After Ye Shiwen shocked the Olympics with her performance in the 400 meter individual medley, swimming the last 50 meters faster than Ryan Lochte, the men’s champion in the event, a long-time American coach ominously hinted that perhaps a new kind of performance enhancement had arrived on the athletic scene.

“If there is something unusual going on in terms of genetic manipulation or something else, I would suspect over eight years science will move fast enough to catch it,” John Leonard, the American executive director of the World Swimming Coaches Association, said.

It’s important to note that there is no evidence that Ye engaged in any doping practice, let alone something as new and high-tech as genetic manipulation.

But, the fact that genetic manipulation was even on the table or in the ether as the example Leonard gave in his accusation is remarkable. So I set out to find out how scientifically plausible it might be for Ye — or any athlete — to enhance his or her performance with current gene doping technology.

Wee Do Ping and Yah Wewon

ᔥ Sydney Morning Herald

It is no surprise that Chinese athletes are yet again caught up on doping scandals. On the eve of the Olympics a former team doctors has broken her silence on doping:

CHINESE Olympians were subjected to a state-sponsored doping regime which was modelled on eastern Europe, says a retired Chinese Olympic doctor.

Steroids and human growth hormones were officially treated as part of ”scientific training” as China emerged as a sporting power through the 1980s and into the 1990s, she says.

Athletes often did not know what they were being injected with and medical staff who refused to participate were marginalised, she says.

”It was rampant in the 1980s,” Xue Yinxian told Fairfax, in her home in Beijing’s eastern suburbs. ”One had to accept it.”

The testimony of Dr Xue, whose elite roles included chief medical supervisor for the Chinese gymnastic team as it vied with the former Soviet Union for gold medals in the 1980s, will not surprise many veterans of Olympic sports.

She does not allege that all successful Chinese athletes used drugs and has refrained, at this stage, from publicising names.

But it is the first time anyone in the system has publicly contradicted Beijing’s line that a slew of embarrassing doping busts, particularly among the Chinese swimming team in the 1990s, was merely the result of ambitious individual athletes and ignorant provincial coaches. Her allegation comes as most of China’s 394-strong Olympic team arrives in London for the opening ceremony tonight, London time.

No it doesn’t

ᔥ NZ Herald

The Herald editorial reckons the government needs to tread warily with drug testing beneficiaries…no it doesn’t, the vast majority of taxpayers who provide the taxes that allow beneficiaries to receive a handout want drug testing…yesterday.

The Herald advocates more hugs and cuddles…like that has worked so far:

 The minister’s approach may work for recreational drug users. Effectively, they are being asked to make a lifestyle choice. But dealing with people addicted to drugs is an entirely different matter.

There is little to suggest that the stick of benefit sanctions will prompt them to drastically amend their lives. Taking money away from them will make no difference because addicts will go to any length to obtain drugs. Indeed, in some cases, they are more likely to be lured into crime or prostitution to feed their addiction.

Sensibly, therefore, the Government plans to exempt drug and alcohol addicts from sanctions for refusing or failing a drug test. It has, however, hinted that such beneficiaries may be forced to get treatment for their addictions. Such a step should be resisted as the policy detail is finalised. In no other area of health is such an approach taken.

For those suffering from a wide range of mental illnesses, for example, collecting a benefit is not contingent on agreeing to treatment. Why, then, stigmatise addicts in this manner? Specialists in drug treatment are adamant that addicts should not, and cannot, be coerced into abstinence.

The recommended approach is to encourage users to enter treatment programmes that offer abundant counselling and support. But it is fair for the Government to insist that if people in work are expected to be drug-free and able to work, it is quite reasonable that non-addicts on benefits should be able to pass a drug test.