Drugs

Photo Of The Day

IMAGE: PETRA NIEMEIER - K & K/REDFERNS / GETTY IMAGES

IMAGE: PETRA NIEMEIER – K & K/REDFERNS / GETTY IMAGES

Hanging out with Hendrix

Jimi Cooking Up A Storm

 34 Montagu Square, in Marylebone, London, is a part of music history. Beatles drummer Ringo Starr leased the ground-floor and basement apartment in the mid-1960s, and Paul McCartney created several Beatles demos there in 1965, including “I’m Looking Through You” from the album Revolver.

Hendrix also lived in the apartment, subletting it from Ringo beginning in December 1966. He lived with his girlfriend, Kathy Etchingham, and also with his manager, Chas Chandler, and his girlfriend, Lotta Null. The monthly rent was £30.

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Awesome! Bali holidays to get cheaper and less Aussies too

Apparently the Aussies are all expressing faux outrage because some drug smuggling ratbags got ventilated.

They want to boycott Bali now.

Australians outraged by the executions of Andrew Chan and Myuran Sukumaran are cancelling their travel plans to Bali.

Melbourne father Malcolm Sheridan had been planning to visit the popular tourist destination with his family in June, but he’s now keeping his travel plans local.

Mr Sheridan said it was the only thing he could do to send a message to the Indonesian government.

“It’s quite barbaric what’s happened over there,” he told AAP on Wednesday.   Read more »

Where was the headline “Cops catch fleeing drug dealer by knocking him off his motorcycle”?

Fairfax has caught the cop bashing disease from the NZ Herald.

Their headline reads “Police admit knocking motorcyclist off bike”.

You’d think this was some random innocent motorcyclist that the Police had run down…but read the article and you find out this was some drug dealing scumbag who fled from the police on a motorcycle.

Police have admitted knocking a motorcyclist off his bike following a high speed chase in Hawera.

A 43-year-old New Plymouth man will appear in court tomorrow on a number of driving and drug charges in relation to the chase on Friday night.

An eyewitness said he saw a police car knock the man off the bike at low speed as it reached the corner of Collins St and South Rd about 11.30pm.

Hawera Senior Sergeant Kyle Davie alleged the motorcyclist tried to evade police twice.   Read more »

Has the ‘War on Drugs’ failed?

The US has has a ‘War on Drugs’ for more than 100 years.

A few short years ago John Key and his Chief ‘Science’ Advisor declared a war on drugs too.

But have all these  wars on drugs worked.

Eric Schneider, author of Smack: Heroin and the American City shares his thoughts at Politico.

Let’s all pause today to wish a happy 100th birthday to the War on Drugs. And what a century it’s been!

Twenty-five years ago, the stated goal of the United States’ anti-narcotic efforts according to the Department of Justice was to “disrupt, destroy and dismantle drug trafficking enterprises.” That same year, the U.S. government pumped almost $8 billion into anti-drug efforts, including $600 million in prison construction alone. It was just a typical fiscal year during the height of the drug war. But two and a half decades later, despite this dizzying spending, we don’t need a drug czar to tell us—even though one of them has—the war on drugs, by its own measures, has been a century-long failure.

A hundred years ago this month, the U.S. government started this fight to rid us of the scourge of opiates. Today, not only have we failed to control drug demand, an entirely new breed of opiate epidemic has flourished in the face of the most draconian drug laws in the world. Aided by aggressive Big Pharma marketing and enthusiastic “pain specialists,” opiate abuse has simply taken on a new shape, moving from urban enclaves and overrunning pockets of New England and the South, from rural Vermont to the suburbs of Dallas, that have little history of widespread drug abuse. Heroin today is cheaper and purer than it was 50 years ago. That’s to say nothing of the 700 percent increase in incarceration of American citizens in the past four decades, the distribution of nearly $450 million worth of military equipment that is used by local and state law enforcement agencies (that “militarization of the police” you’ve been reading so much about lately), and the creation of a wasteful, labyrinthine bureaucracy dedicated to what has proven a perhaps impossible goal: The eradication of drugs.

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Antony de Malmanche a patsy?

anthony_glen_de_malmanche_with_alleged_drugs_Master

Accused Kiwi drug smuggler Antony de Malmanche has met with his New Zealand Lawyer Craig Tuck in Bali over the past two days.

Mr Tuck said de Malmanche was being held in a cell with 27 other prisoners with very limited food and amenities. Read more »

Prepare to be an organ donor

The dunderhead arrested for drug offences in China was allegedly carrying 30kg of ‘ice’.

The chances of builder Peter Gardiner avoiding the death penalty in China have rapidly deteriorated with Customs officials revealing they believe he was the owner of two pieces of luggage stuffed with 30 kilograms of methamphetamine.

Yesterday marked D-Day for New Zealand-born Gardiner, 25, as it was his 37th day in detention, the longest Chinese authorities can keep a person without letting them go or charging them.

However, a newspaper report indicated that Customs officials believed he was involved in a drug-smuggling plot and his Australian travelling partner, Kalynda Davis, 22, had no knowledge or involvement. Read more »

It appears you can buy justice in NZ now

It appears you can buy justice in NZ, and it only costs you $30,000 to avoid a conviction for drug dealing.

The gangs will be so pleased to know this.

An online personal trainer who pleaded guilty to drug dealing will be discharged without conviction after arguing he had become a “brand” since his offending.

Josef Rakich, 23, the owner of JosefRakichFitness.com, appeared for sentence in the High Court in Auckland today after pleading guilty to selling and conspiring to sell the Ecstasy-like drug mephedrone.

Justice Ailsa Duffy said she would discharge Rakich without conviction after defence lawyer Adam Couchman pointed out that the offending occurred in 2011 but his client was not arrested until 2013.

The drug dealing occurred “when he was 20 years old with nothing”, Couchman said.

Since then, Rakich had built a successful and lucrative on-line personal-training and menu-plan business that employed seven people.

“The defendant is his own brand. It’s him that people want to see,” Couchman said.   Read more »

Did San Francisco experience a drop in violent crime because the cops stopped enforcing drug laws?

Reason.TV looks at the astonishing drop in violent crime that coincides with the SFPD stopping prosecuting drug users.

An interview with San Francisco police chief Greg Suhr.

“I’m a narc. I’ve been a narcotics guy forever,” says San Francisco police chief Greg Suhr. “But I’m just telling you, I’ve always felt bad for the people that were addicted to drugs.”

Suhr is following in the footsteps of his predecessor, George Gascon, who is now District Attorney in the city and who began the process of de-emphasizing drug enforcement in the midst of cutbacks to the police force in the wake of the 2007 recession. Since Suhr has taken over, he’s disbanded most of the force’s narcotics unit, and drug arrests have plummeted by 85 percent.

Suhr is no fan of drug legalization. He views drug addiction as a serious public health problem, a debatable assertion with its own set of dubious public policy implications, and he looks upon drug dealers with scorn and says they are preying on the sick.   Read more »

So where did the drugs go?

The story of gang drugs going missing from an evidence locket in the Waikato leading to the case against that gang member being dropped just won’t lie down.  The cop under the gun explains why he was so “friendly” with the gang

A former Huntly police officer believed it was his duty to forge relationships with gang leaders and criminals.

Blair Donaldson said it was his job, as a sergeant, to make those ties.

“If I’m on leave and there’s a gang homicide, they’re not going to speak to some stranger.”

Donaldson, 52, believes it was these relationships that meant he came under suspicion when police began a criminal investigation three years ago into the disappearance of methamphetamine from the Huntly police station.

About $5000 worth of the drug, confiscated from a Black Power member was taken from an evidence safe some time between June 2010 and January 2011, when a district-wide audit found the drugs missing.

Police have now admitted “multiple” drugs exhibits went missing from the station, but have refused to give details.

Two weeks after the theft was discovered, the gang member changed his plea from guilty to not guilty, sparking speculation within police circles that a “rat” had tipped off the gang that the drugs were gone.

Donaldson subsequently found himself the subject of a Code of Conduct investigation over an audit he had conducted of the station shortly before the drugs were discovered missing.

He was accused of falsifying the audit and later charged with serious misconduct. His relationships with gang members were brought up during questioning.

He strongly denies any wrongdoing and feels as though he’s been made a scapegoat. His record, including a bravery award for helping defuse a hostage situation, wasn’t taken into consideration, he says.

It isn’t too hard to connect the dots.  But to do so at a standard that can stand up in court appears to be the problem.  Especially when it turns out their “evidence safe” was a joke   Read more »

Too much information

segg1

Look, it’s a slow news day.  You can suffer this with me.

An inmate with more than 100 convictions was taken to North Shore Hospital after allegedly hiding drugs and a mobile phone in his rectum.

Patched Mongrel Mob member Paul Cloke is said to have raised suspicion among prison guards at Auckland Prison, Paremoremo, by acting “bizarrely” in his cell.

He was kept in an observation room before being sent back to his cell in the prison’s West Wing with other medium-security inmates. But a prison source said that the next morning guards noticed something was seriously wrong with Cloke. Read more »

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