Drugs

Photo of the Day

boosterCocaine Cowboys

Back In the Day

When They Used To Market Cocaine

Through the 70s and 80s, one drug rules them all. That drug was cocaine.

Before it was rendered illegal, the sale of drug paraphernalia was big business. These vintage commercials show luxurious black sofas, sexy women, and lots of cocaine.

These advertisements, ripped from magazines such as Head, High Times, Rush and Flash offer a glimpse of the wide range of flashy gear and accessories offered to the cocaine connoisseur of the late ‘70s and early ‘80s.

The 1970s were a weird time, not least because you could apparently advertise cocaine in magazines despite this being the first decade of President Nixon’s Controlled Substances Act.

In June 1971, Nixon declared a war on drugs. He said that drug abuse was “public enemy number one in the United States”. Which is right where all of these ads were published.

The devices and gadgets up for sale include the practical, such as a spray to ease irritated nostrils and products to keep the powder dry and free of clumps. Then there’s more performative and ostentatious gear, including gold-plated razor blades and ornately carved, ivory snorting straws. For a drug as classy and luxurious as coke, a rolled-up dollar bill simply won’t do.

While the War on Drugs was underway — Ronald Reagan popularized that infamous phrase — and cocaine was still very much illegal, selling and marketing paraphernalia (“Not intended for illegal use!”) was a legitimate and lucrative business.

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Two wrongs don’t make a right, but hell, is it tempting

The mother of two who orchestrated a vicious attack on a drug dealer believed to be selling poor quality methamphetamine has been jailed.

In February 2015 Codie-Lee Greer arranged for four associates to attack the dealer because he owed money and they believed he was selling dodgy drugs.

The 25-year-old didn’t take part in the assault, which involved the assailants arming themselves with weapons including a baseball bat and a hammer, but her role was to arrange a meeting with the dealer at a school at night by text message.

The victim suffered a broken fibula in his left leg, cuts to his head, lips, arms, a broken tooth and bruising to his body.

“The victim was assaulted and he fell onto the ground where he was punched, kicked and struck with the baseball bat and hammer. Read more »

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Photo of the Day

Beach Boys in a Yellow Jalopy in 1962. COURTESY OF CAPITOL RECORDS ARCHIVE

Beach Boys in a Yellow Jalopy in 1962. COURTESY OF CAPITOL RECORDS ARCHIVE

The Beach Boys’ Crazy Summer

The 50th Reunion Tour was a World Concert Tour by The Beach Boys

Inside the group’s 50th anniversary 2012 reunion tour: How the legendary group fell apart and came back together and how Brian Wilson gets along with his old bandmates.
“The vibe in Burbank is collegial, but each Beach Boy is locked into his own orbit. Wilson and Love tend to communicate through the musical directors they’ve retained from their respective touring bands; Jardine, Johnston, and Marks hover on the margins. Over lunch, Jardine says he’s been urging Love to open the second half of the set with ‘Our Prayer,’ the hushed choral prelude to Smile, but so far, Love has been brushing him off. ‘With him, you never know if it’s confrontational or uncomfortable because he’s able to mask any kind of negativity,’ Jardine says. ‘You never know if you’ve (expletive) up or not.’ When I mention ‘‘Til I Die,’ a stark Wilson solo composition from 1971, Johnston, who’s sitting nearby, insists that it was ‘the last Brian Wilson recording. Ever. The career ended for me right with that song.’ But why? ‘Because he was still 100 percent,’ Johnston explains. ‘Now, he’s … you know, a senior guy.'”

Brian Wilson, the lumbering savant who wrote, produced and sang an outlandish number of immortal pop songs back in the 1960s with his band, the Beach Boys, is swiveling in a chair, belly out, arms dangling, next to his faux-grand piano at the cavernous Burbank, Calif. studio where he and the rest of the group’s surviving members are rehearsing for their much-ballyhooed 50th Anniversary reunion tour, which was set to start in 2012.

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Photo Of The Day

The Irish Independent ran a defiant front page on the 12 February, 2016, responding to threats on its journalists who are being targeted by organized gangs. The headline reads: ‘Why We Won’t be Intimidated’ and features a photo of Sunday Independent reporter, Veronica Guerin, who was gunned down in 1996 by a Dublin crime gang for writing a number of stories on their crimes.

The Irish Independent ran a defiant front page on the 12 February, 2016, responding to threats on its journalists who are being targeted by organized gangs. The headline reads: ‘Why We Won’t be Intimidated’ and features a photo of Sunday Independent reporter, Veronica Guerin, who was gunned down in 1996 by a Dublin crime gang for writing a number of stories on their crimes.

 A Journalist’s Risks

Dying to Tell a Story

 The Veronica Guerin Story

When Veronica Guerin was murdered in June 1996, she was not only the most famous journalist in Ireland; she was something of a national heroine. Her exposes on the criminal underworld in Dublin and the violent rise of powerful drug dealers captured the nation’s attention. Her murder touched off the largest criminal investigation in Irish history. Moreover, her death transformed the country in ways few could have expected.

Veronica “Ronnie” Guerin was born in Dublin, Ireland on July 5, 1959. On June 26, 1996 Guerin became the twenty-fourth journalist to be killed for her writings to the public. She was a journalist working for the Sunday Independent when she was assassinated by Irish drug dealers while sitting in her car at an intersection on the Naas dual carriageway.

What made her stand up and decide that enough was enough, that something had to be said about the drugs in Dublin when no one else would? It was as simple as seeing what needed to be changed in her city. She didn’t have illustrious beginnings, one that would fuel her passion for journalism and for bringing the truth to light. She was born to a large family and grew up in North Dublin. She was educated by nuns in Killester and attended Trinity College where she developed a strong interest in politics. She studied accountancy at the college, before joining her father’s accountancy firm; she would later bring this experience into her investigations on fraud. After leaving her accountancy job, she started her own public relations firm before joining the Sunday Business Post.

But it was at the Sunday Tribune that her reputation began to grow as an investigative journalist when she got the first interview with Bishop Eamon Casey. He had fled to Ecuador when his affair and his son were revealed to the world in a book.

In 1994 she joined the Sunday Independent, where she began publishing the interviews with members of the Irish underworld that led to her death. Ironically, she was assassinated two days before she was supposed to speak at a conference in London on “Dying to Tell a Story: Journalists at Risk.” Guerin had her own style of writing that set her apart from other journalists. Her editor at the Sunday Independent, Willie Kealy, believes she provided a different voice than those that were present in Irish journalism at the time, someone who was unafraid to break out of the mould.

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123rd conviction? Seriously? How about protective custody under the Mental Health Act?

When someone racks up their 123rd conviction you know there is no helping them.

A “prolific” repeat offender has notched up his 123rd conviction.

Karl Stephen Baars’ criminal history includes 90 convictions for burglary, violence and theft and 31 convictions in the youth court.

The 27-year-old was sentenced on Monday for shoplifting from The Warehouse in Blenheim and breaching intensive supervision.

Baars, a recovering meth addict, was sentenced to community detention at a rehab centre, as Judge Richard Russell said this was his best chance of escaping the cycle of re-offending.

He can’t escape the cycle, he is the cycle.

Baars was required to wear an electronically-monitored bracelet to make sure he completed the full 10-week course at the St Marks Residential Addiction Treatment Centre in Blenheim.

His sentencing was put off until a room became available.

He had been in custody since he was caught shoplifting on February 11.

His lawyer Rob Harrison said Baars had worked extremely hard to get clean over the past few months.

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Photo Of The Day

John Holmes; John Holmes by Mark Sullivan; John Holmes, Self Assignment, November 1, 1975; Los Angeles; California. (Photo by Mark Sullivan/Contour by Getty Images)

John Holmes; November 1, 1975; Los Angeles; California. (Photo by Mark Sullivan/Contour by Getty Images)

The Devil and John Holmes

John Holmes was a porn star. Eddie Nash was a drug lord. Their association ended in one of the most brutal mass murders in the history of Los Angeles.

Holmes’s biggest commodity had been trouble. He was freebasing one hit of coke every ten or fifteen minutes, swallowing forty to fifty Valium a day to cut the edge. The drugs affected his work, he couldn’t work in porn. Now he was a drug delivery boy for the Wonderland Gang. His mistress, Jeana, who’d been with him since she was fifteen, was turning tricks to support his habit. They were living out of the trunk of his estranged wife’s Chevy Malibu. Holmes was stealing luggage off conveyers at L.A. International, buying appliances with his wife’s credit cards, fencing them for cash.

Since the late Sixties, Holmes had traded on his natural endowment. In a career that would span twenty years, Holmes made about 3000 pornographic films, had sex with 14,000 women. At the height of his popularity, he earned $3000 a day on films and almost as much turning tricks, servicing wealthy men and women on both coasts and in Europe.

He got hooked on drugs, primarily cocaine, which eventually rendered him incapable of performing. He was always late to the set, and when he finally did show up he’d disappear into the bathroom for hours at a time. After which point, of course, he was scatterbrained and unable to perform. Then he stopped getting roles.

During the height of his drug addiction, Holmes went broke and turned to crime to support his habit. He stole luggage from the baggage claim at LAX, sold things he purchased with his wife’s charge cards, broke into cars. Somewhere around this time, John got involved with alleged drug dealer Eddie Nash, who had an unsavory reputation.

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Drug dealing and guns go together: you can’t have one without the other

Almost consistently, guns that are owned illegally by criminals are part of a more sinister criminal activity – drugs and gangs.

What I’ve noticed – and particularly in the last few weeks – is that Police only find guns when they are conducting raids for other reasons, like a raid on a dope grower. There might be other reasons they are at a house or business premise and accidentally find guns, but the guns are not the reason they’ve turned up.

It shouldn’t really surprise us when Police find gangs and drug lords in possession of firearms. The Media party are, of course, stunned and want to sensationalise the hell out of it.

But drug making and distribution is the pinpoint of illegal activities in New Zealand and, logically, I’d expect the scumbags are keen to protect their cash cow business from other drug kingpins who will advance territorially if they can.

Scumbag criminals aren’t exactly going to have a dance-off to settle differences are they?

The guns found and used over the last week or so totally clouded the real reason the Police were at these places – other crimes.  Read more »

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Photo Of The Day

Pablo Escobar, the godfather of the Medellin Cartel. 1988 Escobar at the height of his power. IMAGE: ERIC VANDEVILLE/GAMMA-RAPHO/GETTY IMAGES

Pablo Escobar, the godfather of the Medellin Cartel. 1988. Escobar at the height of his power.
IMAGE: ERIC VANDEVILLE/GAMMA-RAPHO/GETTY IMAGES

He Once Burned $2 Million

When his family were hiding at a farm in the mountains surrounding Medellín, Escobar burned $2 million to save his daughter from the cold weather. Puts Dad buying you a new football into perspective.

Pablo Emilio Escobar Gaviria was born December 1, 1949, in the town of Rionegro, nestled in the Northern Andes not far from the city of Medellin in the Colombian province of Antioquia. The son of a peasant farmer and a schoolteacher, there was nothing in Escobar’s background to suggest the meteoric and spectacularly sociopathic trajectory his life would follow.

Before he was a murderous drug lord, Pablo Escobar was part of his neighbourhood Boy Scout troop. He would cut his neighbours’ lawns to raise money, go camping on the weekends, and watch cowboy movies with the rest of his prepubescent cohort. Escobar also filled his personal library — which he decorated with a human skull he had dug out of the graveyard — with Communist texts by Vladimir Lenin and Mao Tse-tung.

Pablo Escobar made his debut in the world of crime by selling fake high school diplomas with his cousin Gustavo Gaviria. He and his cousin also learned how to copy their teachers’ handwriting to fake final grade reports and stole the answers to difficult exams so they could sell them. After providing dozens of people with falsified academic documents, Escobar and his cousin moved on to a variety of other criminal schemes like stealing cars, robbing movie theatre ticket windows, and selling stolen tombstones.

While fairly well-educated, he never had a reputation as a brilliant intellect. Rather, like Al Capone, his main “talent” was an unlimited capacity for violence.

When poverty forced Escobar to drop out of Antioquia’s provincial university in 1966, he started stealing cars and trafficking marijuana, which made him a millionaire at 22. Next he invested his fortune in the nascent cocaine business, monopolizing local coca production by paying peasant farmers twice the going rate and investing in coca cultivation in the remote mountain valleys of Peru and Bolivia, far from weak central governments.

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Crybaby of the week

LIZ WALKER: Blames a Playboy magazine for her mental health issues, alcoholism, promiscuity and drug addiction

LIZ WALKER: Blames a Playboy magazine for her mental health issues, alcoholism, promiscuity and drug addiction

Our Crybaby of the Week blames looking at a Playboy magazine when she was 6 years old as the cause of her promiscuity, drug and alcohol addictions and her poor mental health.

Liz Walker was only six years old when an older girl from up the street squashed in next to her on the school bus and excitedly whispered “Hey do you want to see something?”

It was a Playboy mag she found under her brother’s bed and full of graphic pornography.

What a load of shite.

Graphic pornography?

In a Playboy?

30 years ago? Yeah right. We don’t know her age, but she has three children and looks from her photo to be late 30s or early 40s. Check out the covers from Playboy back in 1987. It hardly matches her claims about “graphic pornography.   Read more »

Teacher buys LSD for supply – still registered

Every week we are provided proof that compulsory teacher registration, something the opposition said was important because it is there to protect the kids, does nothing of the sort.

There is a parade of teachers before the courts and the disciplinary tribunal. This one bought and dispensed LSD…but he is still registered.

A Masterton teacher who dished out LSD tabs to his mates on a weekend getaway at a bach has been censured.

Isaac Dransfield was charged with serious misconduct by the Education Council complaints committee for supplying and consuming class A drugs in November 2014.

He was employed as a teacher at Rathkeale College in Masterton at the time.

Dransfield, now 27, bought eight LSD tabs and took the drugs with his friends at a bach at Aromoana Beach in Central Hawke’s Bay, where the group were celebrating a birthday.   Read more »

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