Education

Andrew Dickens refuses to follow the NZME party line: parents are to blame

Andrew Dickens recognises bullshit when he sees it and he’s recognised that it isn’t the government’s fault there have only been moderate increases in results from National Standards.

He’s even called out the union shills like Kirsty Johnson. He has gone up considerably in my opinion, admittedly from a rather low base.

Having pulled the housing issue apart over the past weeks my colleagues at NZME have now turned their attention to education.

The headlines all yesterday morning was that a quarter of our children starting secondary school are below the National Standards introduced by National in 2008.

This despite an investment of $250m extra by the Government to lift literacy and numeracy.

Cue Talkback. Teachers are all Marxists. NCEA is crap. Nobody rote learns any more. All anyone cares about is participation not success and winning. It’s PC gone mad. Kids can’t climb trees and it’s all social engineering. Blah blah blah blah.

There’s an awful lot of smoke and mirrors here.

Yes an extra quarter billion has been invested. But remember our population has swelled by 500,000 people in the last decade so that money was needed just to keep pace. When politicians say they’re spending more on health and education remember that they have to because there are more of us.

They’re playing politics. That’s because they’re politicians.

As an aside when was the last new hospital built in this country, which, by the way, is 20 per cent bigger than 10 years ago?

So the figure says we’ve flatlined. In other words the problems we have in education are exactly the same as the problems we’ve always had. We’re no better or worse than we’ve ever been.

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ERO can’t fault three new Charter schools. What will Chris Hipkins spin this as?

Chris Hipkins is going to find this hard to spin his way.

Three new Charter schools got a good grade from the Education Review Office.

Radio NZ’s John Gerritson obviously didn’t get the union memo.

Three new charter schools have made a good start, according to the Education Review Office.

The reports covered two of the publicly-funded private schools in Auckland, Te Kura Māori o Waatea and Pacific Advance Senior School, and one in Whangarei, Te Kāpehu Whetū -Teina.

The reviews were generally positive, but identified problems such as the need to increase enrolments or develop curriculums.

The report for Pacific Advance Senior School said it had 105 students in Years 11 and 12 at the start of this year and the school had done a good job of engaging them in their learning.

It said many students started at the school well below achievement expectations for their age level and to get students confident and able to complete Level 1 NCEA qualification was a significant success for the school.

It said 36 students were awarded Level 1 NCEA, which was 57 percent of the student body.   Read more »

Two questions for Chris Hipkins

It's a crisis I tell you!

It’s a crisis I tell you!

Following on from Chris Hipkins declaring a crisis in education, I have two questions for him to answer.

  1. Isn’t the real “crisis” in education that PPTA-staffed schools ensure that only 14% of Maori school leavers (20% of Pasifika) have University Entrance?
  2. Charter schools use their funding to provide uniforms and stationery and do not ask for donations. States schools have that choice and don’t do it. Will Labour require them to?

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Labour declare a new crisis…Education

Labour have a habit of declaring a crisis in almost any industry sector. They declared one in manufacturing and it was promptly solved. They declared a crisis about Kiwis leaving for overseas and now they are all coming home.

The latest crisis that Labour have declared is in Education. Chris Hipkins emails seeking a whole lot of misery-guts whingers so they can pimp them to the Media party:

From: Chris Hipkins
Date: Thu, Apr 28, 2016 at 3:09 PM
Subject: SURVEY: Is this costing you?
To: [REDACTED]

[REDACTED],

A free education used to be a right in New Zealand. But the cost of education is rising and many Kiwis and their children are missing out.

In fact, the cost of sending a child to school is increased at ten times the rate of inflation. Rising school donations, the cost of school trips, extras and digital devices are all driving up the cost of sending our children to school.

And the cost of post-school education is dramatically rising too, making it harder for Kiwis to train and retrain for work.

We know the stats – but we want to hear how it’s affecting people like you, [REDACTED].    Read more »

And yet Charter schools do it on decile 3 funding

As a perfect example of how out of touch unions and the opposition are on education witness this:

School fees and donations are rising at almost 10 times the rate of inflation, new figures reveal.

The latest figures from the Consumer Price Index (CPI) show a rise of 3.7 per cent in what schools are asking parents to pay – more than nine times the overall inflation rate of 0.4 per cent.

The Consumer Price Index (CPI) tracks changes in primary and secondary school fees and donations each year.

Labour’s education spokesperson Chris Hipkins said education costs have really “started to bite” in the last year and a half.

“We know that parents are being asked more and more to put their hands in their pockets to help fund the costs of their kids’ education,” he said.

“We’re seeing a transfer of costs from schools onto parents.”

Hipkins said more money should be put into education. Funding shortages had “moved far beyond the days of sausage sizzles and cake stalls”.

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Nothing to see here either Chippy – Status Quo for the Education System Works Fine?

Chris Hipkins wants to close down Charter Schools that are making a difference to Maori and Pasifika families because the unions are telling him to tell the country that the system works fine for everyone anyway and that there is plenty of “choice”.

The statistics speak for themselves but Hipkins either can’t hear them or read them and he definitely can’t understand them.

Roll Based Statistics 2015

 Y11 NCEA Level 1 % Pass

Asian 88
European 82
Pasifika 73
Maori  64

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Still nothing to see here Chippy?

As noted here, Chris Hipkins has a major conflict brewing with Labour MPs who actually care for Maori and Pasifika youth.

He is going to ask them to vote to close 8 – 10 thriving Charter schools that are full of Maori and Pasifika children/families with high aspirations.

He says nothing different is needed as the State system is fine.

The 2015 results are just out and there is another take on the University Entrance situation. This is the qualification that can actually break cycles. Even just counting students who have made it all the way through to Year 13 there are massive differentials.

Year 13 Roll Based UE Pass rate 2015    Read more »

Bless, Paul Little actually gets something right

Paul Little is the classic Ponsonby arts luvvie, sanctimoniously opining and hectoring that he and his pals know best.

It isn’t often that I agree with him, but today is a red-letter day… I actually do agree with him.

At least the kids mucking around doing BAs aren’t suffering from the delusion that their piece of paper will be an entree into any sort of occupation, unlike those at the many private degree mills earning qualifications for jobs that aren’t there.

There are so many of the latter that Andrew Little’s suggestion of a return to free tertiary education for all and at any age looks foolhardy.   Read more »

And Labour wants to give them a free education too?

Richard Harman‘s morning email brought some interesting news:

Four factsheets on the national employment outcomes for young domestic graduates, released by the Ministry of Education, follow the earnings and employability of students for the first nine years following graduation. The information comes from a dataset administered by Statistics New Zealand using the earnings for each discipline based on actual tax returns.

“Those with a bachelors degree earn on average 40 per cent more than the national median earnings after five years in the workforce. Those with post-graduate qualifications above bachelors earn even more. These benefits continue to increase over time,” says Tertiary Education, Skills and Employment Minister Steven Joyce.

The figures show that after five years those with a bachelors degree in medical studies earned 201 per cent more than the national median earnings, those with a bachelors in banking and finance and law earned 65 per cent more than the median and sales and marketing was 47 per cent above the median.    Read more »

As per usual, the problem will be enforcement

The Secondary Principals’ Association is backing calls for New Zealand’s truancy problem to be tackled head on.

The National Urban Maori Authority claims financial barriers are proving an issue for students, with education becoming a low priority for many families.

SPANZ president Sandy Pasley says principals are becoming frustrated with excuses being made.

The last Ministry of Education snapshot found more than 27,000 students were absent from school without a reason in the week surveyed.

27,000 kids that are absent without a stated reason in a week.

The reason that can happen is because… nothing actually happens.  Read more »

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