Employment

More good news, less people on benefits and more jobs available

You could say the good news just keeps on truckin’ on:

The labour market is taking off, with more jobs advertised in March, continuing a run of rises for three months in a row, a bank survey shows.

A strong economy is now being accompanied by rising employment, that will provide a backbone to household income growth over the months ahead.

The latest ANZ job ads survey points to unemployment falling from 6 per cent at the end of last year to 5.7 per cent at the end of March and dropping even more in coming months.

The number of job advertisements lifted 1.1 per cent in March, seasonally adjusted.

“This bodes well for an ongoing downward trend in the unemployment rate.” ANZ said.

Job advertising on the internet in March rose 2 per cent but fell 4.6 per cent in newspapers.

In the three months to March the level of internet job advertising lifted 6.4 per cent compared with the previous the three months, to be 15.3 per cent higher than a year ago.  Read more »

Are Anzac Day poppies a food preparation health hazard?

Credit:  christchurchdailyphoto.co.nz

Credit: christchurchdailyphoto.co.nz

Bevan Hurley reports

A fast-food worker is taking legal advice after he was ordered to remove an Anzac poppy from his work uniform.

Josh Lucas, 21, said he was sent home from Burger Fuel Riccarton in Christchurch on Friday after he refused to take off the poppy.   Read more »

More good news, job growth rises as economy continues to expand

The economy continues to pick up with more jobs being advertised.

The way the economy is growing it is squeezing out the opposition’s plans for a negative campaign talking about National’s handling of the economy. When they exclaim “where are the jobs?” they will be pointed at these sorts of statistics.

Job listings on Trade Me increased 21 per cent year-on-year in the first quarter, according to the auction website.

Trade Me says the new figures follow a 17 per cent year-on-year increase in listings in the final quarter of 2013, reinforcing the upturn in the economy.

The company wouldn’t say how many jobs were listed in the three months to March 31 due to “commercial sensitivity”, but it said the number was more than 50,000.

The figures show all the major centres had strong year-on-year growth in the first quarter. Listings were up 25.5 per cent in Wellington, 24.1 per cent in the Bay of Plenty, 23.9 per cent in Canterbury, 20.1 per cent in Hamilton and Auckland and 19.0 per cent in Otago.

Southland (up 41.3 per cent) had the strongest growth, while only three of the 15 regions (Gisborne, Hawke’s Bay and Manawatu/Whanganui) saw listings growth of less than 10 per cent.

The improving job market is a good sign for human resources and recruitment, which was the fastest-growing sector with a 45.7 per cent year-on-year listings increase.  Read more »

Incredible!!!! PSA let down members – Observation by the Owl

Brenda Pilott is one to watch…I posted this about a year ago.
11% increase on assets the members already own. How can you increase something that you are actually providing a service of subsidising for?.
But here is the rub.
PSA made $1.214M in 2013. Has $26M in assets.
How can the lowly pay involved in the living wage protest as directed by the PSA afford their own subsidised holiday homes?  Read more »

Minimum wages don’t work in alleviating poverty

Hat tip Lindsay Mitchell

A new study shows that the minimum wage as a means to alleviating poverty is a fallacy.

Minimum wages are poorly targeted to those actually in need, says Joseph Sabia, an associate professor of economics at San Diego State University.

  • Sabia’s own research has found no evidence that increasing the minimum wage reduces poverty, even among less-educated single mothers, who are specifically targeted by these policies.
  • Research by David Neumark and William Wascher found that while some poor workers that kept their jobs after the wage increase were lifted from poverty, others lost their jobs and fell into poverty. The Neumark and Wascher findings indicate that wage increases only redistribute income between poor and near-poor households.
  • Some in favor of wage increases have said that the poor record of wage increases on alleviating poverty is simply because poverty is an imperfect way of measuring the economic well-being of low-income households. As such, Sabia and Robert Nielson of the University of Georgia studied whether wages were effective in reducing alternate measures of well-being, finding no evidence that higher minimum wages helped people pay rent, pay utility bills on time, avoid financial or health insecurity, or make ends meet in other ways.  Read more »

More jobs for Kiwis but union doesn’t want them, wrong type of jobs apparently

Having spent the last 5 years giving airtime to anybody willing to stand up and say “where are the jobs Mr Key” the broadcast wing of the Labour Party have discovered that in fact there are lots of jobs.

New Zealand is seeing a swell in the number of foreign call centres that are setting up customer service bases here.

Among them are many Australian companies, who are choosing New Zealand over their own cities and other cheaper Asian nations because of better business conditions and similar accents.

“New Zealand is about 25 to 30% cheaper than operating in Australia,” says Telnet Services spokesperson Simon Bocking.

“That’s primarily as a result of our lower salaries, lower tax rate, lower rental and utility costs and also the flexibility of our workforce.”

And while the development is proving positive for the employment sector, providing thousands of jobs, some unions are criticising the development.  Read more »

Wellington Council faces living wage blowout

The stupid politicians in Wellington who handed over their wage negotiations to Rev Charles Waldegrave are now facing the prospect of a massive blowout in the wages bill after the Rev. Charles Waldegrave decided to unilaterally increase his Living Wage assessment.

Wellington City Council is facing a budget blowout on its living wage policy, just two months after becoming the first council to adopt it.

Councillors voted 9-5 in December to adopt the living wage for its staff at a rate of $18.40 an hour. But Living Wage Aotearoa, the group that sets the rate, has now raised it to $18.80.

Andy Foster, who voted against the living wage in December, said the increase would lift the wage bill for the 400 staff directly employed by the council by $332,000 a year.

But he warned that figure could blow out to as much as $5 million if it was extended to people working for council-controlled organisations and on council contracts, and if relativity adjustments were made for other staff.

“These are big numbers,” he said.

The latest rise highlighted his philosophical concern that the council had effectively handed control of staff pay-setting to an outside organisation.  Read more »

Rare as hen’s teeth this sort of union boss

Who would have thought you’d ever hear a union boss face reality…and even speak up about it.

Rapacious unions and stupid subsidies have seen the end of Holden and Ford manufacturing in Australia, while rampant union corruption is a festering sore in many states.

One of Australia’s most senior union officials has criticised the industrial relations system for “dragging Australia down” and fired a broadside at “criminals” who betrayed the union movement and hijacked its agenda.

Australian Workers Union chief Paul Howes has called for a “grand compact” between business and unions to take the heat out of the industrial relations debate and admitted wages in some sectors had increased too quickly.

The speech was declared a “disgrace” by the Greens deputy leader Adam Bandt, who said the AWU leader was “giving ammunition to Tony Abbott’s attack on Australian wages” and should resign his post.

Mr Howes warned the resources boom was now over and that Australia faced a jobs crisis, with 130,000 losses since the global financial crisis and “tens of thousands more lie just around the corner”.

Mr Howes urged his comrades in the union movement to concede there had been a pattern of unsustainable wages growth in some sectors of the economy, adding “we could be pricing ourselves out of the market”.   Read more »

More good news, unemployment hits 3 year low

The opposition just can’t catch a trick at the moment…the government says economic growth is the way to to prosperity and out of unemployment, the oppositions says where are the jobs.

Then the economy grows and the jobs come on line and unemployment drops. Pretty soon we will hear from someone like Darien Fenton moaning that the jobs people are getting aren’t “quality” jobs.

Paul McBeth at BusinessDesk reports:

New Zealand’s unemployment rate fell to a three-year low in the fourth quarter of 2013 as jobs growth beat expectations, led by gains in the retail, accommodation and hospitality sectors.

The unemployment rate fell to 6 percent in the three months ended Dec. 31, in line with the forecast by a Reuters survey of economists, and down from 6.2 percent in the September quarter, according to Statistics New Zealand’s household labour force survey. That’s the lowest jobless rate since June 2009.

Employment rose 1.1 percent in the quarter, beating the 0.5 percent pace of growth forecast, led by gains in retail, accommodation and food services, construction, and professional scientific, technical, administration and support services. Employment grew 3 percent on an annual basis.   Read more »

This country is becoming a bunch of sooks

Have we become a nation of sooks, a bunch of nancies running off and complaining to the Human Rights Commission and the Privacy Commission and the Employment Tribunal over hurt feelings?

It seems we just may be. Stephanie Flores writes at NBR:

If I ever have a son in New Zealand, I imagine he would punch his way out of the womb, assume the scrum position, then ask where his shotgun is because it’s duck hunting season in the Waikato.

At least that’s how I imagined a male Kiwi is born: tough, macho, hair already growing on his ape-like chest.

But after months of reading Employment Relations Authority decisions, I’m getting the impression that today’s males in New Zealand are more like the Village People version of Macho Man, rather than the Sir Colin Meads of the old days.

This week, more authority decisions trickled out with workers claiming their employers hurt their feelings or, even worse, actually asking them to work.

Now I’m pretty sure my first editor ate cigarettes for breakfast and nails for dessert. It was 10 years ago but I still remember his hatred for humanity and the bloodlust for junior reporters that emanated from his desk.

After a hiding from him, I always waited until I got home to cry with a bottle of vodka and in the comfort of my own bed, which is the proper way to deal with workplace stress.

But I never, ever, considered contacting an employment lawyer seeking advice on my hurt feelings.

Unfortunately for employers, the trend in employment law is moving in the opposite direction.  Read more »