Employment

Fenton wrong on contract labour

Darien Fenton has gone out to the media attacking modern work practices:

Employers are increasingly using temporary or contract staff in place of permanent positions, according to a new report.

Labour says that’s bad news because the workers have no rights and no defence against arbitrary dismissal.

MP Darien Fenton is citing a report by recruitment agency Hays which says 64 per cent of employers now use temporary or contract staff.

And 18 per cent say they intend increasing their use of those staff.

“Contractors have no employment rights at all, including no minimum wage, no holidays and no rights to protection against unfair dismissal,” Ms Fenton said.

“At its worst, temporary workers are used to replace good, well-paying jobs with agencies who employ workers on minimum wage to do essentially the same work as those they work alongside.”

Ms Fenton says even more disturbing is that some employers admitted using temporary and contract work as a means to assess ongoing employment.

“The 90-day trial period was supposed to provide a way for evaluating suitability of employment, yet employers are continuing to dream up new devices to avoid the obligations of employment law and put the risk back on workers,” she said. Read more »

Survey: 59% of bosses battling to fill jobs

“I know”, says David Cunliffe, leader of the NZ Labour Party, “I have a brilliant idea to solve the Auckland housing shortage. ¬†Let’s cut immigration from 40,000 down to 5,000″.

James Ihaka shows why this is another Labour policy that crumbles within 48 hours of having been made up on the hoof

New Zealand ranks seventh among the top 10 countries that are having problems finding highly skilled staff, thanks largely to the Christchurch rebuild and construction and infrastructure developments in Auckland, a survey shows.

The figure is up from 48 per cent in 2012 and 51 per cent last year.

The survey of more than 650 Kiwi employers found engineers are the most in-demand employees followed by those in skilled trades.

Accounting and finance staff came in third, ahead of management and executive positions as the fourth most in demand.

Matt Love-Smith, general manager of Manpower Group New Zealand, said despite the country having an unemployment rate of 6 per cent, employers were battling to find highly skilled staff.

We need capable, high skilled migrants. ¬†We need people to help run our country, generate GDP and contribute to the tax take. ¬†¬† Read more »

Labour donation facade SMASHED – Observation by the Owl

From today the Owl will start to take the lid off Labour’s Union donations and campaigns.

The first question I started with was this.

Why are unions not making any donations to Labour party especially in election year?

This is an incredible situation.

There is a clear rule under donation declaration that services in lieu must be reported along as cash donations.

Today the Owl SMASHES the situation and will show how donations are now replaced by campaigns. Before anyone says the Owl is a foolhardy – just remember this very important fact – it took 18 months but finally a numbers of unions had to declare millions in accounted funds.¬† Read more »

Now, don’t laugh, but I think I found a decent trained and skilled one at the Herald

Statistics-New-Zealand_2

Following up from my piece about the need to be be widely read to decipher what the “Truth” really is, I stumbled – incredulously – across this piece:

Brian Fallow at the Herald writes about the Household labour force survey and doesn’t just pick the side that makes one political party look good. ¬† We get both sides

Employment grew strongly in the first three months of the year but so did the supply of workers, leaving unemployment unchanged and wage pressures subdued.

Statistics New Zealand’s household labour force survey recorded a rise of 22,000 or 0.9 per cent in the number of people employed in the March quarter, but that was matched by a 22,000 increase in the labour force, leaving the unemployment level unchanged at 147,000 and the unemployment rate steady at 6 per cent.

Over the year ended March the working age population increased by 50,000, boosted by a strong net inflow of migrants.

But the labour force grew by 82,000 over the same period as the participation rate (the employed and those looking for work, as a share of the working age population) climbed to 69.3 per cent – a record high and up from 67.9 per cent a year ago.

So.

More jobs to go around at the same time as more people joined looking for work.

No discernible spin.

As rare as it is amazing.

 

Welfare reforms in UK encouraging entrepreurial spirit

Good news out of the UK as welfare reforms appear to be working well.

Benefit cuts are pushing more people into self-employment and helping to create a new generation of entrepreneurs, the Bank of England has suggested

The Bank announced that one of the most ‚Äústriking‚ÄĚ features of the economic recovery has been the record 4.5‚ÄČmillion Britons who are now self-employed.

According to official figures, the number of self-employed workers has risen by more than 600,000 since 2010, accounting for more than a third of the 1.5 million new jobs created since then.

The Bank said the trend was partly down to government welfare reforms, such as the ¬£26,000 benefits cap, pushing people back into work. Iain Duncan Smith, the Work and Pensions Secretary, claimed that the figures were evidence that the Coalition was reviving Britain‚Äôs ‚Äúentrepreneurial spirit‚ÄĚ.

He told The Telegraph: ‚ÄúEvery one of our welfare reforms has been about getting Britain working, so it‚Äôs encouraging to see the Bank of England explicitly linking our reforms with the strength of the UK labour market. ¬†¬† Read more »

More good news, less people on benefits and more jobs available

You could say the good news just keeps on truckin’ on:

The labour market is taking off, with more jobs advertised in March, continuing a run of rises for three months in a row, a bank survey shows.

A strong economy is now being accompanied by rising employment, that will provide a backbone to household income growth over the months ahead.

The latest ANZ job ads survey points to unemployment falling from 6 per cent at the end of last year to 5.7 per cent at the end of March and dropping even more in coming months.

The number of job advertisements lifted 1.1 per cent in March, seasonally adjusted.

“This bodes well for an ongoing downward trend in the unemployment rate.” ANZ said.

Job advertising on the internet in March rose 2 per cent but fell 4.6 per cent in newspapers.

In the three months to March the level of internet job advertising lifted 6.4 per cent compared with the previous the three months, to be 15.3 per cent higher than a year ago.¬† Read more »

Are Anzac Day poppies a food preparation health hazard?

Credit:  christchurchdailyphoto.co.nz

Credit: christchurchdailyphoto.co.nz

Bevan Hurley reports

A fast-food worker is taking legal advice after he was ordered to remove an Anzac poppy from his work uniform.

Josh Lucas, 21, said he was sent home from Burger Fuel Riccarton in Christchurch on Friday after he refused to take off the poppy. ¬† Read more »

More good news, job growth rises as economy continues to expand

The economy continues to pick up with more jobs being advertised.

The way the economy is growing it is squeezing out the opposition’s plans for a negative campaign talking about National’s handling of the economy. When they exclaim “where are the jobs?” they will be pointed at these sorts of statistics.

Job listings on Trade Me increased 21 per cent year-on-year in the first quarter, according to the auction website.

Trade Me says the new figures follow a 17 per cent year-on-year increase in listings in the final quarter of 2013, reinforcing the upturn in the economy.

The company wouldn’t say how many jobs were listed in the three months to March 31 due to “commercial sensitivity”, but it said the number was more than 50,000.

The figures show all the major centres had strong year-on-year growth in the first quarter. Listings were up 25.5 per cent in Wellington, 24.1 per cent in the Bay of Plenty, 23.9 per cent in Canterbury, 20.1 per cent in Hamilton and Auckland and 19.0 per cent in Otago.

Southland (up 41.3 per cent) had the strongest growth, while only three of the 15 regions (Gisborne, Hawke’s Bay and Manawatu/Whanganui) saw listings growth of less than 10 per cent.

The improving job market is a good sign for human resources and recruitment, which was the fastest-growing sector with a 45.7 per cent year-on-year listings increase.¬† Read more »

Incredible!!!! PSA let down members – Observation by the Owl

Brenda Pilott is one to watch…I posted this¬†about a year ago.
11% increase on assets the members already own. How can you increase something that you are actually providing a service of subsidising for?.
But here is the rub.
PSA made $1.214M in 2013. Has $26M in assets.
How can the lowly pay involved in the living wage protest as directed by the PSA afford their own subsidised holiday homes?¬† Read more »

Minimum wages don’t work in alleviating poverty

Hat tip Lindsay Mitchell

A new study shows that the minimum wage as a means to alleviating poverty is a fallacy.

Minimum wages are poorly targeted to those actually in need, says Joseph Sabia, an associate professor of economics at San Diego State University.

  • Sabia’s own research has found no evidence that increasing the minimum wage reduces poverty, even among less-educated single mothers, who are specifically targeted by these policies.
  • Research by David Neumark and William Wascher found that while some poor workers that kept their jobs after the wage increase were lifted from poverty, others lost their jobs and fell into poverty. The Neumark and Wascher findings indicate that wage increases only redistribute income between poor and near-poor households.
  • Some in favor of wage increases have said that the poor record of wage increases on alleviating poverty is simply because poverty is an imperfect way of measuring the economic well-being of low-income households. As such, Sabia and Robert Nielson of the University of Georgia studied whether wages were effective in reducing alternate measures of well-being, finding no evidence that higher minimum wages helped people pay rent, pay utility bills on time, avoid financial or health insecurity, or make ends meet in other ways.¬† Read more »