Energy

Possible “Ice Gas” bonanza for NZ

The other day I highlighted what Japan was doing in exploration for hydrates or “ice gas”.

We are nowhere near peak oil as we discover new sources of energy.

At the Advantage New Zealand Petroleum Summit yesterday, the boss of Shell also covered this energy source.

New Zealand’s next energy game changer could be the “super resource” of gas hydrates, says Shell New Zealand chairman Rob Jager.

Speaking to the Advantage New Zealand Petroleum Summit yesterday, he said “ice gas” beneath the sea off the coasts were recognised internationally as having significant potential as a future energy resource.

“One [government study] explains this resource could possibly be about 10 times as big as the giant Maui gas field when it was first found,” Jager said. “GNS science says we have some of the biggest deposits of ice gas in the world, with the potential to meet all New Zealand’s needs and create a gas export for decades.”    Read more »

Simon Bridges wants more people driving gay cars

It is bad enough that Craig Foss has gotten himself a new gay ute, but now Simon Bridges wants us to drive cars gayer than Fossy’s gay ute.

I mean seriously? Expensive, over priced, non-Green, electric cars?

The only good news is he doesn’t support subsidies.

Transport and Energy Minister Simon Bridges has officials investigating ways to accelerate the uptake of electric vehicles.

But he doesn’t favour incentives or subsidies in what he says is “the most EV-ready country in the world” because of New Zealand’s very high proportion of electricity generated from renewable resources.   Read more »

Hundreds of birds fried with latest “green” power project in the US

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When “green” power solutions aren’t shredding birds with wind turbines they are frying them with massive subsidised concentrated solar arrays.

It’s no secret that solar power is hot right now, with innovators and big name companies alike putting a great deal of time, money, and effort into improving these amazing sources of renewable energy. Still, the last thing you’d likely expect is for a new experimental array to literally light nearly 130 birds in mid-flight on fire.

And yet, that’s exactly what happened near Tonopah, Nevada last month during tests of the 110-megawatt Crescent Dunes Solar Energy Project.

According to Rudy Evenson, Deputy Chief of Communications for Nevada Bureau of Land Management (NBLM) in Reno, as reported by Re Wire, a third of the newly constructed plant was put into action on the morning of Jan. 14, redirecting concentrated solar energy to a point 1,200 feet above the ground.

Unfortunately, about two hours into the test, engineers and biologists on site started noticing “streamers” – trails of smoke and steam caused by birds flying directly into the field of solar radiation. What moisture was on them instantly vaporized, and some instantly burst into flames – at least, until they began to frantically flap away. An estimated 130 birds were injured or killed during the test.

[…]    Read more »

Is the case for wind power running out of puff?

As regular readers will know I abhor wind power.

It is for a number of reasons…visual pollution, noise pollution, their bird and bat destroying un-green-ness and the fact that wind power doesn’t work unless it is subsidised.

The UK more than most countries has ‘invested’ billions in wind technology, which has proved spectacularly useless at producing power.

UK electricity demand hit its highest level this winter on Monday – while wind turbines generated their lowest output, official figures show.

Cold weather saw UK demand hit 52.54 gigawatts (GW) between 5pm and 5.30pm, according to National Grid.

At the same time, low wind speeds meant the UK’s wind turbines were producing just 573 megawatts of power, enough to meet only one per cent of demand – the lowest of any peak period this winter, Telegraph analysis of official data shows.

Earlier on Monday wind output had dropped even lower, generating just 354 megawatts at 2pm, or 0.75 per cent of Britain’s needs – the lowest seen during any period this winter.

The analysis will fuel concerns that despite receiving billions of pounds in subsidies, Britain’s wind farms cannot be relied upon to keep the lights on when they are needed the most.

Britain now has about 12 GW of wind capacity installed on and offshore – meaning during Monday’s peak demand period, wind farms were generating less than five per cent of their theoretical maximum output.

Gas, coal and nuclear power plants instead provided the vast majority of the UK’s electricity needs.

A spokesman for National Grid said that Britain’s spare margins – the safety buffer between supply and demand – had remained “adequate”.

On average, UK wind farms produce about 28 per cent of their theoretical maximum power output.

But critics warn that cold snaps when demand soars can often coincide with periods when the wind doesn’t blow.

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Labour in the UK declares a crisis in energy…problem now solved

Oh dear lord, it seems Ed Miliband has David Cunliffe and the NZ Labour party advising them.

They are even mimicking declaring a crisis for particular industries and just like in New Zealand they have tried to come up with their own power solution.

It has of course been widely mocked.

Labour’s flagship energy price freeze was branded ‘a joke’ last night, as senior figures in the party confirmed it has been reviewed in the light of falling prices.

The price freeze, which Mr Miliband pledged would last until 2017, has been thrown into turmoil in recent weeks as a slump in the price of oil saw the prospect of falling energy prices.

The Daily Mail revealed yesterday that Labour is conducting a U-turn on the policy, which was launched by Ed Miliband in 2013.

It has now been ‘re-branded’ as a price cap, which will allow bills to fall to reflect tumbling wholesale prices.

Yesterday E.On became the first Big Six firm to offer a cut in gas prices of 3.5 per cent to its customers, and others are expected to follow suit.  Read more »

Can anyone spot the problem with this picture?

Only the Greens would promote this…in this way.

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Jordanian MP: I Would Set Myself On Fire Before I’d Import Israeli Gas

Some people are dumber than a sack of hammers, especially those who would seek to impoverish their own citizens over religious hatred.

Truth Revolt reports:

In a televised debate about energy options for Jordan, advertising executive-turned Member of Parliament Hind Al-Fayez said that in order to stay warm, “I will use firewood or even set myself on fire, but I will never import Israeli gas.”

Ms Al-Fayez warned that Israel was Satan and her country’s plan to purchase natural gas from Israel was part of an Israeli plot to starve the Jordanian people.

The debate aired on the Jordanian/U.K. ANB channel on December 14, and was translated by MEMRI:

Al-Fayez: We must not have dealings with Satan. We should not use the Jordanian deficit as a pretext to justify dealing with Satan. The Jordanian Kingdom has been having dealings with Satan since 1994 but where has it gotten us? What did it do to our deficit?   Read more »

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More on the lack of peak oil

Yesterday we explored the lack of peak oil.

I also found an interesting recent article on the topic at Real Clear Politics.

In a chilling 2010 column, Paul Krugman declared: “peak oil has arrived.”

So it’s really not surprising that the national average for a gallon of gas has fallen to $2.77 this week – in 10 states it was under $2.60 – and analysts predict we’re going to dip below the two-dollar mark soon. U.S. oil is down to $75 a barrel, a drop of more than $30 from the 52-week high.

Meanwhile, the Institute for Energy Research estimates that we have enough natural gas in the U.S. to meet electricity needs for around 575 years at current fuel demand and to fuel homes heated by natural gas for 857 years or so – because we have more gas than Russia, Iran, Qatar and Saudi Arabia combined.

With prices returning to ordinary levels and a few centuries’ worth of fossil fuels on tap, this is a good time to remind ourselves that nearly every warning the left has peddled about an impending energy crisis over the past 30 to 40 years has turned out to be wrong. And none of them are more wrong than the Malthusian idea that says we’re running out of oil.

Each time there’s a temporary spike in gas prices, science-centric liberals allow themselves a purely ideological indulgence, claiming – as Krugman, Paul Ehrlich, John Holdren and countless others have – that we’re rapidly approaching a point when producers will hit the maximum rate of extraction of petroleum. Peak oil. With emerging demand, fossil fuels will become prohibitive. And unless we have our in solar panels in order, Armageddon is near.   Read more »

Even Google Engineers now say Renewable Energy ‘Simply won’t work’

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Google is one of the biggest investors in renewable technology. They have poured billions into research and now their top engineers say that renewable energy is hopelessly flawed.

Eric Worrell at WUWT explains:

A research effort by Google corporation to make renewable energy viable has been a complete failure, according to the scientists who led the programme. After 4 years of effort, their conclusion is that renewable energy “simply won’t work”.

According to an interview with the engineers, published in IEEE;

“At the start of RE<C, we had shared the attitude of many stalwart environmentalists: We felt that with steady improvements to today’s renewable energy technologies, our society could stave off catastrophic climate change. We now know that to be a false hope …
Renewable energy technologies simply won’t work; we need a fundamentally different approach.”
http://spectrum.ieee.org/energy/renewables/what-it-would-really-take-to-reverse-climate-change Read more »

And they said it wouldn’t happen to them

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For some time I’ve been warning various companies that the troughers who beat up on the tobacco  industry are now turning their sights onto products like energy and sugary drinks. They said nah it wouldn’t happen to them.

Well I told them.

In Australia we now see the same tactics once applied to tobacco companies now being applied to anyone employed by energy drinks manufacturers. And it’s happening now.

Deakin University in Australia is currently holding the 1st International Energy Drinks Conference in Victoria.

Here’s how they view participation by anyone from companies that manufacture these drinks.

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