European Union

If we listened to progressives the following changes would need to be made

So-called progressives have made lots of interesting observations over the years, but none more so than after the Brexit vote.

Stephen Franks elucidates their suggested constitutional changes:

A much younger and more beautiful friend tells me:
“According to my Facebook feed, Brexit has highlighted some obvious flaws in the democratic system. This is what I’ve learned these past few days:

(1) Votes should be weighted in favour of the professional and cosmopolitan classes   Read more »

Boris Johnson and Michael Gove set about each other with knives

Michael Gove announced that contrary to his previous position he was going to run for leader, effectively stabbing Boris Johnson in the back. Boris, for his part, then said he wouldn’t stand either, effectively stabbing Michael Gove as well.

Boris Johnson’s allies warned there is a ‘deep pit in Hell’ waiting for Michael Gove tonight after the Justice Secretary stabbed his fellow Brexit champion in the back saying he was not up to being Prime Minister.

Mr Gove delivered a brutal verdict on Mr Johnson’s capabilities and questioned whether his ‘heart and soul’ were in taking us out of the EU, effectively ending his hopes of succeeding David Cameron, as he announced his own bid for Downing Street.

Damning his friend with faint praise, Mr Gove said he had ‘enjoyed working with him’ during the referendum campaign. But he said: ‘I realised in the last few days that Boris isn’t capable of building that team and providing that unity.

‘And so I came reluctantly but firmly to the conclusion that as someone who had argued from the beginning that we should leave the European Union and as someone who wanted ensure that a bold, positive vision for our future was implemented, that I had to stand for leadership of the Conservative party.’

He added: ‘I thought it was right that following the decision that the people took last week that we should have someone leading the Conservative party and leading the country who believed in their heart and soul that Britain was better off outside the European Union.’

As the blows rained down on Mr Johnson this morning, key backers Nick Boles and Dominic Raab defected to Mr Gove’s campaign and arch-rival Theresa May won support from Leader of the House Chris Grayling – another Brexit champion.

Within hours Mr Johnson, who had been the hot favourite, was using an event that had been intended as his campaign launch to rule himself out.  Read more »

Oh the irony – the people scared of Brexit border control are looking to leave

So, they wanted to stay in the EU but, now they won’t be, they are looking at bailing out altogether.

New Zealand could see an influx of immigration from the United Kingdom, if a huge rise in Britons Googling for information about moving to New Zealand is anything to go by.

A Google Trends report shows a large spike in people from the UK searching “moving to New Zealand” after the country voted to leave the European Union on Friday.

They were also looking for information on Canada and Australia.

The Immigration NZ website has also seen traffic rise following the Brexit vote, more than doubling since Friday.   Read more »

Scotland talks about independence but are really just a bunch of bludgers

Ian Wishart writes:

Scotland’s First Minister Nicola Sturgeon is a skilled politician.

I know this, because of all the hand-wringing and angst that’s emerged in the wake of the Brexit vote, hers takes the cake.

Given the quality of the competition, that takes some doing.

Oh I don’t know. Rachel Smalley’s effort was spectacular.

You’ve got the young people bleating their futures were robbed – an empty claim when we find out only 38% of them even bothered to vote.

Then you’ve got three million people – including 77,000 from the ‘Vatican’ with a population of a thousand – demanding the right to another referendum. Even if they got 18 million signatures, constitutionally it is tough luck: a vote is a vote. On the day, the winner takes all.

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Guest Post: Twenty-four hours of mourning is enough!

by Frances Denz

Twenty-four hours of mourning is enough! Britain has now to face the fact that they have been given an amazing chance to change their own world. They can take the chaos and turn it into opportunity. They have done a SWOT analysis involuntarily, and identified collectively what really matters to them. They now know what they want and what they don’t want, and they can move towards their ideal purposefully. Such an exciting opportunity is rarely offered to any country. Probably the last time was after the Second World War, when the British Labour Government was elected with a clear plan of action.

Now is the time for the old beards to stop saying, “It worked before joining the EU, therefore it can work again.” No it didn’t – it was dreadful. I was in Britain during two of the serious recessions, one of which was the “winter of discontent”, and I can see no point in reliving that! Equally, the young are whinging, saying something that mattered to them was taken away. Well, find a way to keep it!

Everything is on the table. Europe will sulk for a while, and try to control the exit process out of spite.  But Britain has time to negotiate to keep what is important and get rid of what isn’t.    Read more »

The astonishing stupidity of Rachel Smalley

We’ve looked at the retarded nature of Rachel Smalley before. She is perhaps the most annoyingly sanctimonious and solipsistic commentator around. Who can forget her ticking off NASA for naming a spacecraft after an eminent scientist, confusing his name (Kepler) with Kevlar and remonstrating that it isn’t a good look to name a spacecraft after bullet proof vests? Of course, she never lets staff in the NewstalkZB newsroom forget that she is the “only serious journalist” in that organisation.

I was looking forward to her column this morning as much as I looked forward to other lefty commentator reports, but who knew she could be so utterly disdainful of the democratic process.

Referendums have their place. Should a country change its flag, for example? That’s a good use of a referendum. But on the issue of E.U membership, an issue of such profound economic importance, why let ‘Jo public’ decide when some among ‘Jo public’ will be ill-informed, politically ignorant and have little understanding of the impact of their vote on trade, on policy, on Britain’s constitution, on the country’s legal framework, on national unity, on a million things.

That’s not democracy. That is political stupidity.

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NZ/UK trade agreement: first in, best dressed

As predicted, Todd McClay is in action immediately seeking to talk trade with UK and EU ministers.

Trade Minister Todd McClay is seeking meetings about Brexit with his counterparts from the European Union and Britain at a G20 trade ministers meeting in China to which New Zealand has been invited.

He said he wanted to discuss New Zealand’s best way forward in light of Britain’s vote to leave the EU.

“In the meantime, it is important for exporters to be assured that our economic relationship with the UK and Europe will remain the same for the foreseeable future.

“Even before Friday’s referendum, we had sought assurances from UK and EU officials that the rules around New Zealand access would not change until they have negotiated new ones with us,” he said.

“We have received those assurances.”   Read more »

I think I’ve died and woken in an alternate universe…where I agree with Bryan Gould

Bryan Gould is a cloth-cap socialist and failed politician.

It is safe to say he is a Euro-skeptic, after opposing the Maastricht Treaty and finally resigning as an MP in protest against Labour’s support for the European Exchange Rate Mechanism. The EU result, where 52% of the voting public rejected staying in the EU, will be the first time that Bryan Gould has been on a winning side for some time.

He writes about why the Remainiacs lost:

Among the many hysterical reactions to the Brexit decision, a particular post on Facebook caught my attention.  The author was convinced that the decision to leave was the equivalent of the Visigoths’ sacking of Rome; civilisation itself was apparently in its last days.

It did not seem to occur to him that the decision to leave the EU was the product of a vote in which a majority of his fellow-citizens had simply, as part of their democratic right, acted on a view, or views, on a subject of interest to the whole community, that were just as valid as, but different from, his own.  The barbarians whom he castigated were not invaders from elsewhere; they were Britons like him, enjoying the same right as he had to consider the issues and express a view.   It is what is called democracy.

The fury and hatred aroused by the discovery that there was actually a majority that disagreed with those who thought that they alone were capable of reaching the right and proper decision – and the vitriol with which those sentiments are expressed – provides us with an insight into the mentality of many of those who simply could not believe that any view other than theirs was possible.

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Listen up Lefties

Just days after voting to leave the European Union, more than 2 million Britons and UK residents have signed a petition calling for a second vote, forcing MPs to at least consider a debate on the issue.

Parliament has to consider a debate on any petition posted on its website that attracts more than 100,000 signatures.

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Winston on cloud nine that democracy isn’t in the hands of the media, the experts or politicians

Winston Peters is in grave danger of having a permanent grin affixed to his face, especially if the wind changes.

New Zealand First leader Winston Peters hailed the Brexit referendum result as “a stunning 24 hours in world politics.”

“There has never been a national referendum in any country where so many outsiders, foreign power brokers, and financial market manipulators have intruded,” Peters during a speech at the Copthorne Hotel in Rotorua on Saturday.

Peters said “expert after expert” had told voters that Doomsday for the British was soon to come if they voted to leave.

“Anyone watching the BBC yesterday saw all these people giving their views and no one went to the working people and asked for their commentary, but suit after suit was talking about working people’s situation,” he said.

The power class are so up themselves they can’t even see the obvious irony of what they are doing. And that phenomena exists in New Zealand as well.

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