Facebook

Oh the irony, it hurts

There is a Facebook group where over 2000 journalists of any and all persuasions gather to talk about journalism.  Full disclosure, I left before the council that convened to discuss throwing me out could complete.  After all, I’m a curse to their profession and as the subject of Dirty Politics I was to be run out of town.

It is in this place that I found the following

werwer

I’m going to let that sink in a little for you.  Here is a journalist, asking other journalist, what they think about content from a public Facebook page being used without their permission by others. Read more »

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Another registered teacher in trouble

Labour and the teacher unions oppose charter schools because they say the lack of a requirement for teachers to be registered puts kids at risk.

Today yet another teacher is under investigation for untoward behaviour with students.

A female physical education teacher at an Auckland high school is on sick leave after she was accused of favouritism towards at least one teenage boy.

As a result of the allegations, the high school is remarking a year of internal NCEA grades for the teacher’s Year 13 class, prompting concern among parents and students some grades will go down.

The teacher, who the Herald has chosen not to name, has been on extended sick leave since the allegations surfaced last month.     Read more »

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A word of warning for fools who hate on their former bosses and blab it all over social media

Some people have gone to town on social media, joining in on the kicking of Roger Sutton. You’d have to wonder they have remained silent for so long but only come out of the woodwork now one of their media pals is having a larrup. Probably because they were protecting lucrative troughing contracts at the taxpayers considerable expense flying in and out of Christchurch to share their pearls of PR wisdom.

That course of action though might well be fraught with danger after a recent Employment Court ruling.=

Employees are being warned not to air dirty laundry about their bosses on social media – even after leaving a job – after a former oil company employee was ordered to pay more than $2500 for making disparaging remarks on Facebook.

The case before the Employment Relations Authority has prompted a call for caution from a top Wellington employment law specialist.

The authority heard that in May last year Kristel McLeod received a “substantial” settlement during an employment dispute with Kea Petroleum Holdings Ltd.

In return, she signed an agreement that she would never speak disparagingly of the company or its officers, the authority said.

Kea is an oil and gas exploration company, which has offices in New Plymouth, Wellington and London.    Read more »

A Terrible Result for Labour

The Leadership election result is absolutely terrible for Labour.

Andrew Little only just beat Grant Robertson, 50.52% to 49.48%.

Andrew Little does not have a mandate.

He only got the support of 4 other caucus members in the first round. So 27 members of caucus ranked him second or worse.

Caucus % Actual
Little 15.63% 5
Mahuta 18.75% 6
Parker 21.88% 7
Robertson 43.75% 14

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So after years of whinging about gambling what does a Labour leader hopeful do?

Grant Robertson has banged on about gambling for ages, attacking constantly the Sky City convention centre deal.

He is even in Hansard railing about gambling and gambling harm.

What is his response to Major Campbell Roberts, from the Salvation Army, who said that the proposed legislation cancels out any benefits, that the harm minimisation measures allowed for in the legislation are a joke, that they are neither robust nor effective, and that they do not represent any significant improvement on the current ineffective practices of Skycity Casino, which are already failing to reduce gambling harm? What is his response to Campbell Roberts’ comments?

Yet around rolls the Melbourne Cup and what is Grant Robertson doing?

That’s right being a hypocrite and flaunting his gambling stubs from the TAB.

10610870_598436246855277_8427676331423965494_n Read more »

Don’t worry no one ever gets prosecuted for Electoral offences

There are a whole lot of people up in arms over the referral of some sports stars by the Electoral Commission to police for breaches of the Electoral Act.

The Commission has  referred 26 incidents to police.

The Electoral Commission has confirmed it has referred former All Black Jonah Lomu, current All Black Israel Dagg and Olympic champion rower Eric Murray to police for tweets sent on election day supporting the National Party. All three tweets have since been deleted.

The commission says it has referred 26 incidents to police in response to complaints about comments made on social media on election day.

That included 13 incidents involving people sharing an election day video featuring John Key and a Vote National Party message, it said.

Under electoral law it is illegal to campaign on an election day, a prohibition which covers the publishing or broadcasting of anything intended to influence votes.   Read more »

Finally someone addresses the elephant in the room for the left wing

Philip Matthews is a Twitter troll, and a journalist. He is a lot like John Drinnan, just with a smaller newspaper to bleat on it.

His constant harping and screeching about Dirty Politics led me to block him, he like many journalists think Twitter is the real world. He still misses the point of Dirty Politics. It was an attempt to silence, in my case permanently, opposing political voices.

Nonetheless he has written an article in the DomPost addressing the elephant in the room…the left wings very own dirty politics brigade (but without the influence or relevance).

The left wing mistook Twitter and blogging for the real world, and failed in their attempts to get me.

But are they part of the problem rather than the solution….after all Martyn Martin Bradbury established The Daily Blog with union funding to be “a Whaleoil killer”…and failed. He never even got close to his stated goal of a million pagewiews a month before the election.

In a parallel universe, David Cunliffe is the prime minister of New Zealand presiding over a Labour-NZ First minority government in a happy arrangement with the Green Party. Internet Mana, backed by German entrepreneur Kim Dotcom, has a few MPs in Parliament, including veteran activist Hone Harawira.

ACT is already history and former Prime Minister John Key has taken a long holiday in Hawaii.

Wake up. The Left was soundly defeated in the 2014 election.

“I think it’s fair to say we haven’t had dreams in colour since September 20,” says Left-wing activist and blogger Martyn Bradbury.

He freely admits he got it horribly wrong. That was his election prediction above. He “didn’t consider for one moment” that voters would rally to National and that high levels of early voting meant that New Zealanders were backing Key.

Instead, Labour had its worst result since 1922, the Greens slipped below their 2011 peak and Harawira is out of Parliament. “Despondent” is a good word to describe how those on the Left feel.

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Corporates build their own newsrooms, feed the corporate media

Andrew Sullivan is a little despondent in his post about corporate newsrooms.

He suggests that sponsored articles or native advertising will win:

Because journalists will make far more money from it than the old, ethical variety. Because no one has come up with a business model that can compete with it for moolah. And, above all, because readers don’t really give a shit:

The article he quotes next is an interesting one, where Columbia Journalism Review looks at corporate newsrooms.

Not ones built by corporate media, but rather ones built be corporates to write their own content to feed to a lazy media.

By next year, Coca-Cola hopes to have killed the press release. It believes the corporate website is dead, and it’s shifting its money away from television advertising. It has little use for journalists who aren’t interested in stories Coke wants to tell. Instead, it’s decided that producing its own content is better than relying on others.

To that end, Coke—and Nestlé and Chipotle and Volkswagen and countless other companies—have blown up their marketing departments in recent years. They’ve infused them with something that looks closer to a newsroom, producing glossy magazines, blog networks, reported articles, long-form narratives, and compelling videos. One Volkswagen video alone, filmed in a Hong Kong movie theater, has drawn almost 29 million viewers on YouTube, proof that you don’t have to work in a newsroom to understand the dynamics of social media. Or check out a site produced by Red Bull on surfing: It’s filled with spectacular photography, short documentaries, the latest news on surfing, and very little about Red Bull energy drinks.

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Karl du Fresne on the news and why he is wrong

Karl du Fresne is a good writer, I enjoy his work.

Yesterday he wrote about the news and in particular the thoughts of Mike O’Donnell and news.

O’Donnell suggests that by the time of the next general election, social media may have rendered the evening television news bulletin extinct. His theory seems to be that consumers of news (a ghastly phrase) will no longer be prepared to wait until 6pm for their fix, but will update themselves constantly throughout the day by accessing news on their smartphones and tablets.

People have the capability to do that now. But do the vast number who still get their news from newspapers, TV and radio really have such a voracious appetite for information that in future they will demand it in (to use another ghastly phrase) “real time”?

I somehow doubt it, and I wonder whether people like O’Donnell have been misled by their own enthusiasm for the digital revolution and their missionary desire to promote its supposed benefits.

du Fresne is both right and dead wrong.

Same with O’Donnell.

People do want news real time, and they don’t care if the quality is poor, they are happy for it to evolve in the course of the life of the story. Mostly though the medium for consuming news will not be via social media…that will simply be the conduit through which you are informed that news exists.

Social media is vastly over-rated and in New Zealand the so-called Twittersphere is in reality a very small world….populated by vocal lefties and tragics who feel the need to comment one everything but ad zero value to the discourse. Just because you can say something doesn’t mean you should.

On top of that the Twitter warriors who try to mount campaigns and bully, threaten and intimidate overstate their actual reach.

During the whole Dirty Politics saga which was designed to cause maximum pressure on me and my associates, but also designed to subvert an election, I was called by people asking me if I had seen this or that mentioned on Twitter. I almost never had seen. I don’t live with my head inside my phone. Frankly Twitter is a waste of time. Again, the general election result proved that.

If you had listened to the agitators and plotter and the guilty on Twitter then my demise was hoped for, in reality as well as metaphorically, but it failed to materialise. Twitter and social media was supposed to deliver the left an election victory. It failed.

Why?

It failed because there is an incredibly small number of people using Twitter, and they only ever talk to each other. They essentially form a group that produces confirmation bias. But when you are wrong and you only talk to people who meet with your ideas of proper political beliefs then all you do is chat agreeing with each other.   Read more »

Telling the hard left to get stuffed is probably the most important thing for Labour to do

Danyl McLauchlan has taken a hiatus from his hiatus…and made a very valid point about just how out of touch the left wing activists are believing their own circle jerk of confirmation bias on Twitter and Facebook.

Here’s a point I meant to make before i went on hiatus. Here’s the aggregated polling for the Internet-Mana Party.

internetmana Read more »