Falklands War

The BBC “assisted the enemy”

The BBC has been dreadfully left-wing since like forever.

Margaret Thatcher even thought that they “assisted the enemy” at the time of the Falklands war.

Margaret Thatcher thought the BBC “assisted the enemy” during the Falklands War by broadcasting “the next likely steps” in the campaign before they took place, documents published for the first time on Friday will disclose.

The former prime minister wrote that she was “very angry” at some of the corporation’s coverage, which she thought placed more value on reporting the latest developments than on “the safety of our forces”.

In her autobiography, Baroness Thatcher criticised the “chilling use of the third person” in bulletins that referred to “the British” rather than “our soldiers”. But she had already written a far stronger attack on the corporation in a private memoir of the conflict, which will be released on Friday after her family donated it and other papers to a public archive in lieu of inheritance tax.

The 17,000-word account, which Lady Thatcher wrote by hand in 1983, a year after the conflict, highlights for the first time the extent of her frustration at specific aspects of the corporation’s coverage.

“Many of the public (including me) did not like the attitude particularly of the BBC and I was very worried about it,” she wrote in the note, which she kept secret even from her private secretaries.   Read more »

Argies need to get over the fact they lost

The Argies are still sooking it up over the fact they lost war and they get mocked for it.

And they would lose again any time they tried to re-take the Falklands. They are whinging about Clarkson still.

Jeremy Clarkson and his Top Gear colleagues deliberately entered Argentina with a Falklands-referenced number plate, a judge has ruled.

Maria Cristina Barrionuevo rejected claims by the BBC and the presenter that the use of the plate H982 FKL on Clarkson’s Porsche was an “unfortunate coincidence”.

She also described the decision to drive through southern Argentina with the vehicle – abandoned after angry locals forced the Top Gear team to halt filming and flee the country – “arrogant and disrespectful”.    Read more »

Next they will be looking for some wind to piss into

The Argies are all upset they’ve been spied on.

I’m surprised they even had a moan, they are still effectively at war over the Falkland Islands, which Argentina still think  are theirs, even after their Army displayed a French like capacity for marching backwards while their Navy ended up on the bottom of the Atlantic.

The Argentine foreign ministry has summoned the British ambassador in Buenos Aires to complain about reports that Britain spied on Argentina amid renewed fears of a Falkland Islands invasion.<

John Freeman, the ambassador, was called in by Eduardo Zuain, the deputy foreign minister, at a time of heightened tensions between the two countries.

Argentina said that it summoned Mr Freeman “to demand explanations over the silence of the British government” over the espionage claims.

He also delivered a threat to prosecute oil companies working in waters off the Falklands and re-iterated Argentine complaints about British plans to boost defences on the islands.

Read more »

The Argies are going to be really upset over this, statue of Maggie erected in Falklands

Margaret-Thatcher-Falklands-240971

A statue of Margaret Thatcher has been erected in the Falkland Islands, a move sure to upset the Argies.

A statue honouring Margaret Thatcher has been unveiled in the Falkland Islands for the first time.

The tribute to the former Prime Minister – who lead Britain to victory in the 1982 conflict to defend the islands – was revealed in the island’s capital Stanley on Saturday.

After Baroness Thatcher died in 2013 the population of the Falkland Islands were consulted about how they wished to commemorate the leader.

The overwhelming response was for a statue which was unveiled at a ceremony on what is Margaret Thatcher Day on the island by her son Sir Mark Thatcher.
Read more »

The Argentinian economy must be rooted

The last time Argentina ignored the roar of the Lion

The last time Argentina ignored the roar of the Lion

The Argie economy must be on its knees with all the belligerence out of Buenos Aires at the moment.

Argentina has ridiculed Britain as an impotent colonial aggressor on the wrong side of history in the Falklands dispute, insisting it will not be cowed by “verbal and military threats” as “the lion roars but does not inspire fear”.

In a lengthy denunciation of British policy published in Argentine daily Pagina 12 (Page 12), Héctor Timerman, the country’s foreign minister, painted Argentina as a valiant underdog cheered on by the world in its David and Goliath-esque battle with an arrogant but ailing colonial power.   Read more »

Cameron tells Argies to nick off

David Cameron has told the Argies that if they want another go over the Falklands then he is up for it.

David Cameron has promised to defend the Falkland Islands after a “momentous” year in which residents voted to remain a British overseas territory.

In a Christmas message, the Prime Minister, said the world should respect the overwhelming result of a referendum in March which came in the face of increasing calls from Argentina to negotiate the island’s sovereignty.

“2013 will be remembered as a momentous year in the history of the Falkland Islands,” Cameron said.

“So as we look to 2014, you can count on the British government’s continued support in countering the Argentine government’s campaign to claim the islands’ resources and to inflict damage on your economy.”  Read more »

Argie ratbags threatening cruise ships

Bereft of a navy, either sunk or turned turtle Argentina is now resorting to harassing cruise ships to try to make a point over the Falkland islands.

Britain has accused the Argentine government of being responsible for escalating tensions in the Falklands.

Four cruise lines recently cancelled scheduled visits to the islands following intimidation from  Left-wing groups and unions.

But new reports suggest the Argentine navy’s own coastguard is harassing ships in Falklands waters.

The British government believes the move marks an escalation of President Cristina Fernandez  de Kirchner’s campaign to ‘strangle’  the Falklands economy.  Read more »

Argies told to bugger off, not welcome at Maggie’s funeral

The Argie ratbags have been vetoed by the family from attending Maggie’s funeral. Good stuff, especially as Cristina Kircher keeps demanding the Falkland Islands back in increasingly shrill statements designed to distract her silly citizens from the financial problems besetting Argentina.

Baroness Thatcher’s family have vetoed representatives of the Argentine government attending her funeral next week.

Whitehall officials proposed the presence of Argentine officials at a meeting of the committee which is organising the funeral, code-named Operation True Blue.

The Telegraph understands that Lady Thatcher’s children, Sir Mark and Carol, believe that such protocol would be “inappropriate”.  Read more »

Argentinian ratbags got what they deserved

The_empire_strikes_back_newsweekApart from smashing the unions Margaret Thatcher also smashed the Argentines after they invaded the Falkland Islands. The Telegraph has some good coverage and the ITN video above is a great summary as well.

Margaret Thatcher served as prime minister for more than 11 years, but it was arguably the 74 days she spent evicting the Argentine invaders from the Falkland Islands that did most to fix the image of an unbending, uncompromising leader in the British popular imagination.

…Several Tory MPs, including Ken Clarke, then a junior minister, warned against fighting. Sir Ian Gilmour, a Tory wet, predicted that “it will make Suez look like common sense” — and a secret memo from defence chiefs spelled out both the expense and “serious risk” of fighting a conflict so far from home.

Overruling those voices of caution, Mrs Thatcher gave the order for the Task Force to sail on April 5 with the aircraft carriers Hermes and Invincible at the centre of a fleet that would ultimately contain 38 warships, 77 auxiliary vessel and 11,000 soldiers and marines.

“We have to recover those islands,” she said. “We have to recover them for the people on them are British and British stock and they still owe allegiance to the Crown and want to be British.”

The cover of that month’s Newsweek magazine was a picture of Hermes beneath the headline “The Empire Strikes Back”.  Read more »

This bloke would probably still scare the Argies

Even though he has chalked out.

Rear-Admiral Linley Middleton, who has died aged 83, was the last captain of the strike carrier Hermes, flagship of the Task Force which won the Falklands conflict 30 years ago.

Middleton was appointed in 1980, while she was being refitted at Portsmouth with a 12-degree ski-jump to operate Sea Harriers . But in June 1981, a few months after she had emerged from the dockyard, Middleton learned that under the 1982 Defence Review his ship was to be scrapped. It required all Middleton’s leadership skills to reconcile his crew to this development, and he had just sent the ship’s company and the aircrew on Easter leave when Argentina invaded the Falklands. Middleton returned from his holiday in the Mediterranean, and in the course of a single weekend recalled his crew and stored his ship so that she was ready to sail three days later, on April 5 1982.

Hermes’s Sea Harriers had been increased from five to 12, and they were lined up on the flightdeck as she left Portsmouth to the cheers of crowds. In mid-Atlantic Hermes was designated the Task Force’s flagship, and Middleton became senior aviation adviser to the Task Force commander.

That is a testament to his organisational skills. HMS Hermes performed well int eh Falklands War under a typical Pommy officer who was humble.

During the 10 weeks of hostilities, Hermes’s air group was further strengthened to 16 Fleet Air Arm Sea Harrier fighters, 10 ground-attack Harriers of the RAF, and 10 Sea King helicopters. With this complement of aircraft Hermes took part in every type of operation during the Falklands conflict: air defence, ground attack, anti-submarine operations, and troop-lift, including Special Forces missions and air-sea rescue.

Between the first aerial combat on May 1 and the last on June 8, Sea Harriers from Hermes shot down 13 Argentine aircraft and destroyed three more on the ground. She also bombed and strafed the spy trawler Narwal, which, after capture, sank on May 10; the carrier’s helicopters also took part in the attempted salvage and subsequent evacuation of the destroyer Sheffield.

When Hermes returned to Portsmouth after an absence of 108 days, Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher was flown onboard to congratulate Middleton and his ship’s company. For his part, Middleton was modest about their achievements: “It was all absolutely routine, daily attacks, nothing untoward,” adding that “The battle was won on the ground, but they couldn’t have done it without us.” He was awarded a DSO.