Firearm

Forget 3d printing, how about a desktop CNC mill?

The same guy who brought you 3d printed AR15 parts has now moved to the next step.

He has developed a desktop CNC mill for under $1000.

You just download the open source design files, load them up in the appropriate software, attach the plug and play CNC mill and insert your receiver blank and voila…a brand new precision engineered lower receiver without a serial number.

Cody Wilson, the fast-talking techno-libertarian famous for unapologetically championing the 3D-printed gun movement, just announced what’s perhaps his boldest move yet. His company, Defense Distributed, is taking pre-orders for a tiny mill that can machine metal guns automatically. It’s called Ghost Gunner, and it’ll ship in time for the holidays.

Ghost Gunner, named for the colloquial term for unserialized firearms, “ghost guns,” is a desktop-sized, computer-guided mill much like the kind you’d find in any high school shop classroom. The 13×11 inch box is designed to fit an 80 percent lower receiver, a firearm component that can be bought legally but needs some specialized milling to fire a bullet. This is where Ghost Gunner comes in.

CAD files can be loaded into Ghost Gunner, and after a little automatic machining and manual screw turning (screws come in the box), Defense Distributed claims that you’ll have your very own functional and untraceable gun. They plan on releasing open source design files for AR-15 and AR-10 assault rifles, as well as the M1911 pistol, before its release.

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Obama is the greatest gun salesman of all time

Barack Obama continues to hold the title of the greatest gun salesman of all time as gun sales surge to new highs.

A record surge in recent firearms production and transactions have swamped the federal government’s automated registration system for select weapons, including machine guns.

In a notice earlier this month to the firearms industry, the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives said it was temporarily suspending parts of its computerized system to shore up capacity in part to process the required registration and transfer of National Firearms Act covered weapons, which also include silencers, short-barreled shotguns, short-barreled rifles and some explosive devices.   Read more »

Photo Of The Day

A Punt Gun, was used for duck hunting but were banned because they depleted stocks of wild fowl

A Punt Gun, was used for duck hunting but were banned because they depleted stocks of wild fowl

Punt Gun

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Friday Firepower – The AK47 and why it became popular

Previous posts about the AK47 are here, here and here.

The Economist examines why the AK47 became so incredibly popular.

MIKHAIL KALASHNIKOV died on December 23rd, aged 94. But his 66-year-old invention, the Avtomat Kalashnikova, has plenty more shots left to fire. Developed in 1947 and first used by Soviet forces in 1949, the AK-47 assault rifle and its many derivatives are now used by the armed forces of more than 80 countries, and by freelancers in many more. No-one knows quite how many are in circulation: 100m is a reasonable guess. As a proportion of all the guns in the world—another number no-one can be quite sure about—Kalashnikovs probably make up more than one in ten of all firearms. Why does an ageing Soviet invention still dominate modern warfare?

The cultural impact of the AK is felt all over the world. Quentin Tarantino’s villains celebrate its appropriateness for “when you’ve absolutely, positively got to kill every [enemy combatant] in the room”. Mexican outlaws boast about their cuernos de chivo, or “goat horns”, the nickname given to the rifle because of its curved magazine. In some parts of Africa, where the gun is seen as a symbol of the ousting of colonial rulers, Kalash is a popular name for boys. Mozambique displays the gun on its flag. In Lebanon, a model nicknamed the “Bin Laden” sells for twice the price of the standard AK-47, because it is the type that al-Qaeda’s former boss was seen toting in some of his videos.  Read more »

“Duck Dynasty” launches its own line of guns

Duck Commander is launching a branded family of shotguns, semi-auto rifles and a semi-auto pistol.

The gunmaker Mossberg has teamed with Duck Commander, the company owned by “Duck Dynasty’s” Robertson clan, to release nine different shotguns, as well as two semiautomatic rifles and a semiautomatic pistol.

Mossberg has begun shipping some of the shotguns to distributors, according to spokeswoman Linda Powell. She declined to name specific retailers that will carry them.  Read more »

As usual media got it wrong

Now the facts are starting to come out we find out that the killer in Washington DC never had semi-automatic weapons at all…he used a pump action shotgun and stole Glock handguns from his victims.

This is why people like Piers Morgan should just stfu.

Authorities investigating Monday’s D.C. shooting spree believe the gunman brought a shotgun, legally purchased from a suburban Virginia gun shop, to the Navy Yard and acquired additional weapons at the scene, according to three law enforcement officials.

The officials said Aaron Alexis of Fort Worth, Texas, a 34-year-old discharged Navy engineer, entered the building with a Remington 870 12-gauge shotgun that he’d purchased last week in Lorton, Va., and was later found with two additional weapons, one of them a Glock handgun.

One scenario authorities were investigating was that he obtained the handgun and the other weapon at the scene, possibly from victims. But officials cautioned the evidence analysis was still very fluid Monday night.  Read more »

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Not just the lower receiver anymore, now a whole pistol

The guy behind the 3D printed AR is set to announce more plans for 3D printed gun parts…with up to 16 printed parts…a complete pistol.

The project is progressing very quickly now.

3d_printed_handgun_liberator

Defense Distributed, the pending non-profit that plans to make 3D-printed weaponry available for anyone with such a printer, will release the blueprints for a fully-working plastic firearm next week.

The handgun, seen by Forbes, uses 16 printed parts that are clipped together and can be fitted with interchangeable barrels to fire different-caliber rounds. The only non-printed part needed to fire is a simple nail, which acts as the firing pin.

Final testing for the firearm is still ongoing by the group’s founder Cody Wilson, who said that the plans should be online next week. The Liberator is printed from ABS plastic using a Dimension SST printer from Stratasys – although that company has already refused Defense Distributed the use of one of its printers.

“Everyone talks about the 3D printing revolution,” Wilson said. “Well, what did you think would happen when everyone has the means of production? I’m interested to see what the potential for this tool really is. Can it print a gun?”

Wilson is a legally certified firearms manufacturer after getting clearance in March, and in order to make the Liberator legal the group has added a six-ounce chunk of steel so that it can be picked up by metal detectors – a requirement for weaponry in the US under the 1988 Undetectable Firearms Act.

Uhmmm, the barrel is steel…they don’t work so flash without a barrel. Predictably the politicians are making stupid statements.  Read more »

Click. Print. Gun.

Watch this 24 minute VICE documentary about 3d printing of your own gun and why gun control is now a fantasy:

Cody R Wilson has figured out how to print a semi-automatic rifle from the comfort of his own home. Now he’s putting all the information online so that others will join him.

This is a story about the rapid evolution of a technology that has forced the American legal system to play catch up. Cody Wilson, a 24 year old University of Texas Law student, is an advocate for the open source production of firearms using 3D printing technology. This makes him a highly controversial figure on both sides of the gun control issue. MOTHERBOARD sat down with Cody in Austin, Texas to talk about the constitution, the legal system, and to watch him make and test-fire a 3D-printed gun.  Read more »

Gun Amnesties don’t work

In the the wake of the Port Arthur massacre Australian politicians reacted in a illogical manner and ignored sensible advice. They put in place bans and amnesties to lower the number of firearms in the community. That hasn’t worked out so well…the numbers though are probably suspect because they are from that anti-gun weirdo Philip Alpers:

Professor Alpers said since eight people were killed in Melbourne’s Queen Street massacre in 1987, Australia had run 38 gun amnesties for a combined total of more than 3000 weeks.

This included the 1996-97 national firearms buy-back and the 2003 handgun buy-back, which resulted in 728,667 newly prohibited guns being handed back in return for compensation.  Read more »

Obama is the greatest gun salesman of all time

Obama continues to be the greatest gun salesman of all time. Ever since taking office the sales of guns have rocketed…now his talk of bans and the like are seeing super-profits being made in guns stores nation-wide:

As Washington focuses on what Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. will propose next week to curb gun violence, gun and ammunition sales are spiking in the rest of the country as people rush to expand their arsenals in advance of any restrictions that might be imposed.

People were crowded five deep at the tiny counter of a gun shop near Atlanta, where a pastor from Knoxville, Tenn., was among the customers who showed up in person after the store’s Web site halted sales because of low inventory. Emptying gun cases and bare shelves gave a picked-over feel to gun stores in many states. High-capacity magazines, which some state and federal officials want to ban or restrict, were selling briskly across the country: one Iowa dealer said that 30-round magazines were fetching five times what they sold for just weeks ago.

Gun dealers and buyers alike said that the rapid growth in gun sales — which began climbing significantly after President Obama’s re-election and soared after the Dec. 14 shooting at a school in Newtown, Conn., prompted him to call for new gun laws — shows little sign of abating.  Read more »