Fonterra

The Empire Strikes Back: Official resistance to New Zealand investment in China

The Markets and Banking reporter for the NZ Herald, Christopher Adams has this story

A high-profile Chinese dairy commentator is calling for China’s government to block Fonterra’s investment in Hangzhou-based infant formula maker Beingmate, showing criticism of foreign investment isn’t a purely one-sided affair when it comes to the business relationship between New Zealand and its biggest trading partner.

Foreign investment, particularly from China, has returned to the forefront of public debate in this country since it emerged that Shanghai Pengxin, the owner of the Crafar Farms, wants to purchase the more than 13,000 hectare Lochinver Station in the central North Island.

Opposition parties have opposed the potential sale and NZ First leader Winston Peters has gone as far as vowing to buy back strategic farmland from foreigners.

But it looks like New Zealand is copping a bit of its own medicine in China.

Time for the Labour, Green and NZ First hypocrites to take their medicine.  They are all very happy about Fonterra sticking it to them foreigners, but lo and behold if we were to let them buy stuff here!

It’s simply dog whistle politics that is fueled by the xenophobia that used to be Winston Peter’s personal brand, but has since been adopted by the Greens and Labour as well.   Read more »

Why isn’t David Cunliffe insisting Fonterra sell all its overseas holdings?

via TV3 News

via TV3 News

Fonterra Cooperative Group Ltd. (FCG), the world’s largest dairy exporter, plans to boost investment in dairy farms and plants in China and other emerging markets as rising demand pushes milk prices higher in the next decade.

“We need to look outside of New Zealand, we need to look at other milk pools,” Chief Executive Officer Theo Spierings said on a conference call today after the Auckland-based company reported an 18 percent rise in first-half profit. “If we only focus on New Zealand, we’ll lose market share, we’ll lose relevance.”

— bloomberg.com, March 2013

David Cunliffe created Fonterra you know.  He did.  He’s so proud of it.  It’s on his CV.  And Fonterra are doing so well, they are expanding by buying overseas properties.  In China, even. Read more »

Told you plain packaging will extend beyond cigarettes, now it will be a trade weapon

I’ve been talking about it for ages, and commenters and other including politicians scoffed…Don’t be silly Cam, plain packaging legislation is for tobacco only.

Except it gives the antis a toehold and now we are seeing the results of that. On top of that tobacco producing countries can use it to conduct a trade war against our exporters.

New Zealand’s wine and dairy producers will be forced to export their products without branding in retaliation for Government’s introduction of plain packaging of cigarettes, tobacco firms are warning MPs.

A senior Indonesian official has been reported saying New Zealand exporters will pay a price for draconian law changes which will require tobacco producers to sell their products in plain packs with standardised fonts and colours.

Tobacco firms and lobbyists repeated the warning to a Parliamentary committee yesterday.

Emergency Committee for American Trade president Cal Cohen told MPs that plain packaging was likely to lead to restrictions of trademarks for other goods such as wine and dairy.

Tobacco giant Phillip Morris pointed to a letter by Indonesia’s former Minister of Trade Gita Wirjawan to New Zealand’s Ministry of Health, in which he said plain packaging breached WTO rules and would have an impact on New Zealand exports.

Wine and dairy…ouchy…I wonder what Fonterra and all the exporters of dairy products think about that…especially those exporting branded baby formula to China.

What about sugar containing products…will they be the next victims in the war of business?

The former minister, now the Indonesian Director General for International Trade Co-operation, made a similar warning in a local news report: “If the cigarettes we export there are not allowed to have brands, then the wine they sell here shouldn’t also.”

New Zealand’s exports to Indonesia were worth nearly $900 million, half of which came from dairy. Food and beverages made up 70 per cent of total exports.

Trade Minister Tim Groser said New Zealand was “exercising its normal rights” through the plain packaging legislation.

He told the Herald: “I’ve met numerous Indonesian officials since we initiated that action and no concern has been expressed to me personally.

“So I would be very surprised if I hear talk in the future of that.”

Be surprised Groser…it will happen. The health busybodies will move from tobacco to sugar, to alcohol to dairy…they will use the same tactics, the same denigration and on top of that use state funding and taxpayer money to do it all.

If tobacco producing countries retaliate they will use the very same arguments Groser is advancing…that [insert country] was “exercising its normal rights” through the plain packaging legislation against alcohol…which from a muslim country like Indonesia is perfectly defensible on religious grounds without any pesky scientific evidence, which is severely lacking in tobacco legislation.

Corporate New Zealand better gear up for a war with the state funded health busybodies, it is coming whether they like it or not and their silence against plain packaging simply emboldens them toa ttack harder.

Leaks tell PR nightmare about to get worse for Countdown

unnamed-1Today in the NZ Herald, Countdown’s boss Dave Chambers has a nice little PR puff piece…banging on about how proud he is of the way Countdown conducts its business.

His line “Kiwis like to buy local products, because of the high quality of our nation’s produce” is soon to be proven to be nothing more than PR spin.

All is not well in Countdown land by the amount of information flooding into the tip-line from disgruntled employees, who are seeing Kiwis protesting outside their supermarkets, Facebook hate pages and constant negative media attention.

The buzz from the tip-line is hinting at a massive hit to New Zealand’s dairy suppliers is about to be announced soon. If my source prove out then Dave’s PR woes will only deepen. If he thinks he can laugh off John Campbell and Mike Hosking and bluff his way around Shane Jones’s accusations, this announcement will hit at the core of New Zealand’s heartland.   Read more »

Let’s have a living tax on companies

David Farrar discusses a “living tax” proposal for offshore companies who pay little or no tax in New Zealand…like APN and Fairfax.

This old fashioned concept of paying tax on profit must be disposed of. We should demand a fair tax system. Let’s calling it a living tax – the level of tax a company should pay so that it no longer feels wretched and is helping fund a civilised society.

I think a 15% tax on revenue would be a fair living tax.  Both the Herald and the Dom Post have repeatedly run stories and editorials comparing tax to turnover, not profit. So we should start the living tax campaign with them. Here’s how it would work:  Read more »

More hand outs to bludging farmers

The Taxpayers’ Union is highlighting yet another example of farmers with their hands out.  This time sheep and beef farmers are getting a cool $15 million from Steven Joyce for genetic engineering research. It blogs:

As Mr Joyce goes on to point out in the release, New Zealand already leads the world in pastoral animal and plant genetics.

“As a nation, we are already leading the world in pastoral animal and plant genetics. This partnership will help us maintain this critical position and to continue to build on it through further research and development in sheep and beef genetics.”

The first part of that paragraph is correct – NZ does lead the word. What is not clear is why taxpayers need to stump up to keep us there. Why does this multi-billion dollar export industry suddenly need the Government pouring millions into it? Expecting increases in farmers’ profits is not justification.

This funding is for good headlines, not good economics. What other industries have their normal research and development costs borne by the taxpayer?

Here here.  I wonder if Joyce will be dolling money out to Fonterra next week…

Some proper facts on the Fonterra cream recall

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Recall is just 350 of these type of crates of cream

The media are making much of the recall of 8700 bottles of cream…it sounds like a large number but is it really?

I made a few calls and ascertained that cream is not delivered in pallets, but in crates and 8700 bottles is only 350 crates of cream.

I then enquired as to how many supermarkets this could affect and the answer was 350 crates would easily be consumed by just two decent sized PaknSave supermarkets.

In other words stuff all.

So there you have it…reality…a very small product recall, of just 350 crates of maybe, possibly, dodgy cream.

Readers have also commented that recalls happen frequently.  Read more »

The World is coming to an End?

As predicted, MSM repeaters are so desperate for stories that this Fonterra cream recall suddenly is taking all their attention.

Take TVNZ’s Matty McLean. He’s crawling the ‘burbs (from his desk) looking for a busy-body nana desperate to be listened to.

If it’s not the berms she’s moaning about, it’ll be her baking. So when Matty McLean calls up granny, she’ll complain bitterly about her cream being off and her pav didn’t rise like it used to.

Read more »

Calm Down, move On

Better circle the wagons.

In what is a typical product recall, Fonterra is recalling a few thousand bottles of cream.

Nothing strange about that, yet, as typical of most lightweight young MSM journalists you’d think the plague had struck New Zealand.

8,700 bottles of cream is a slightly different situation to 38 tonnes of whey protein. Perspective is needed.

Sensible comments from Federated Farmers’ Willy Leferink who said:

“If you don’t trust your product you do a recall. It probably shouldn’t have gone into the marketplace in the first place but food safety is paramount, so if you then find there is problems with the product then a recall is justified,” he said.  Read more »

Fonterra – a Pharmaceutical supplier?

by blokeintakapuna

With the inevitability of Marijuana becoming fully legal in NZ at some point in the future, as it is currently doing in the very same corners of the World where NZ “copied & followed” their lead on legislation – thereby creating World-wide prohibition – so its inevitable at some point in the future, NZ will also re-legislate that this God-given natural plant should also be treated like all other natural plants and herbs… and be available for personal use however the individual wishes.

The fallacy that all pot smokers are complete stoners, is akin to saying all wine drinkers are alcoholics. Yet, wine is treated as “holy” in the Church for Sacraments, people drink moderate amounts with meals…. Cooking with it, sometimes even adding it to the food, as well as drinking sociably – and to the extreme – abusing it in bouts of binge drinking too.

The hypocrisy of outlawing a natural herb and plant, whilst trying to legislate for “safe” man-made alternative derivates of the very natural plant/herb now illegal – where the man-made product is now proven to be highly dangerous to the individual and society – is simply bizarre beyond any sense of sensibility. It is ideology completely out of step with today’s observed reality.

…and tying to “ban/prohibit” adults from utilising a natural, God-given herb because some might try and abuse it’s intoxicating properties, is like trying to stop an entire country from enjoying a gambling/convention centre venue because a few create problems for themselves. Or, because NZ has “boy-racers” speeding and killing innocent people on the roads – all vehicles will be made illegal. Surely a much better option would be to allow adults free-use and pour the funds and resources that would have otherwise gone into legislation/enforcement into assistance for anyone that has “problems/issues” with continued use. Of course, there’s also the very valid option of just not doing it anymore if you don’t like/enjoy/want to.   Read more »