France

The Recipe for Islamic Terror in France

Media and politicians seem unable to understand the recipe for Islamic terror in France even though there is a repeated pattern of behaviour. The pattern involves young Muslims spending years engaging in un-Islamic behaviour before completing terrorist attacks.

They go drinking, clubbing, do drugs and indulge in other non-Muslim like behaviour before turning to Islam and engaging in violent Jihad.


France’s Recipe for endless Jihad:

  1. They are Muslims in terms of what they believe but they are not Muslims in terms of their actions. In France they have the freedom to indulge in non-Islamic behaviour that they wouldn’t be able to indulge in if they were back in an Islamic country. Plenty of Christians can relate to this idea of believing one thing but in reality doing another. Muslims are not the only people who don’t always live their lives according to the rules/standards that they were brought up with.
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Why do our leaders not see this as war?

I was watching Last Night of the Proms last night, and they started the performance with this:

As anthems go, La Marseillaise is definitely in the top 10.  Stirring stuff.  A haka in its own right.  It made me reflect on Nice, as it was, of course, the Proms’ tribute to the French.   And it struck me that we are a marvellous people.  Look at what can be done when we work together.  A stage full of people who are near the top of their game on each instrument, coming together; not to shine as individuals, but to work together towards a goal so much greater than themselves.   Read more »

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The New York Times are dancing on the head of a pin about terrorism in France

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First, let’s look at the facts:

  • It was not a man named Bruce who, in an act of terrorism, mowed down women and children at a family celebration in France. It was a man named Mohamed.
  • It was not the first ISIS-inspired terrorist attack in France nor will it be the last.
  • All the terrorist attacks in France this decade have been committed by radicalised Muslim jihadis. Every single one.
  •  France is not the only European country to experience a terrorist attack committed by a radicalised Muslim jihadi.

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“We are in a war with terrorists” – Nice terrorist update [WARNING GRAPHIC IMAGES]

WARNING GRAPHIC IMAGES

Information is starting to settle down a bit.  And it is all awful.

Here, the police are trying to stop the truck before it plows into the crowd

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Photo of the Day

Advancing across no man's land in the mist. An assault force advancing across no man's land in what apprears to be either a morning mist or a gas cloud ...

Advancing across no man’s land in the mist. An assault force advancing across no man’s land in what appears to be either a morning mist or a gas cloud …

The Battle of the Somme

But all that my mind sees

Is a quaking bog in a mist — stark, snapped trees,
And the dark Somme flowing.

Vance Palmer (1885–1959),

‘The Farmer Remembers The Somme’

The Battle of the Somme, fought in northern France, was one of the bloodiest of World War One. The aims of the battle, were to relieve the French Army fighting at Verdun and to weaken the German Army. However, the Allies were unable to break through German lines. In total, there were millions dead and wounded on all sides.

The Battle of the Somme, also known as the Somme Offensive, was one of the largest battles of the First World War. Fought between July 1 and November 1, 1916 near the Somme River in France, it was also one of the bloodiest military battles in history. On the first day alone, the British suffered more than 57,000 casualties, and by the end of the campaign the Allies and Central Powers would lose more than 1.5 million men.

A truly nightmarish world greeted the New Zealand Division when it joined the Battle of the Somme in mid-September 1916. The division was part of the third big push of the offensive, designed to crack the German lines once and for all. When it was withdrawn from the line a month later, the decisive breakthrough had still not occurred.

Fifteen thousand members of the division went into action. Nearly 6000 men were wounded and 2000 lost their lives. More than half the New Zealand Somme dead have no known grave. They are commemorated on the New Zealand Memorial to the Missing in Caterpillar Valley Cemetery, near Longueval. One of these men returned home to New Zealand in November 2004; his remains lie in the tomb of the Unknown Warrior outside New Zealand’s National War Memorial.

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Arrests in suspected terrorist hit at the Belgium/Ireland Euro 2016 match

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Three months after Islamist bombers killed 32 people in Brussels, police searched dozens of houses across the country and arrested 12 people the night before Belgium’s Euro 2016 game against Ireland on Saturday.

Nine of them were released after questioning but three Belgian nationals identified as 27-year-old Samir C., 40-year-old Moustapha B., and 29-year-old Jawad B., were charged with “having attempted to commit a terrorist murder and for participation in the activities of a terrorist group”, the federal prosecutor’s office said in a statement.

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Poms will probably exit, now the Frogs are thinking about it too

The Poms are heading for a Brexit, and now the Cheese Eating Surrender Monkeys are looking at heading out of Europe too.

France has turned even more viscerally eurosceptic than Britain over recent months, profoundly altering the political geography of Europe and making it impossible to judge how Paris might respond to Brexit.

An intractable economic crisis has been eating away at the legitimacy of the French governing elites for much of this decade. This has now combined with a collapse in the credibility of the government, and mounting anger over immigration.

A pan-European survey by the Pew Research Center released today found that 61pc of French voters have an “unfavourable” view, compared to 48pc in the UK.

A clear majority is opposed to “ever closer union” and wants powers returned to the French parliament, a finding that sits badly with the insistence by President Francois Hollande that “more Europe” is the answer to the EU’s woes.

“It is a protest against the elites,” said Professor Brigitte Granville, a French economist at Queen Mary University of London. “There are 5000 people in charge of everything in France. They are all linked by school and marriage, and they are tight.”

Prof Granville said the mechanisms of monetary union have upset the Franco-German strategic marriage, wounding the French psyche.  “The EU was sold to the French people as a `partnership’ of equals with Germany. But it has been very clear since 2010 that this is not the case. Everybody could see that Germany decided everything in Greece,” she said.

The death of the Monnet dream in the EU’s anchor state poses an existential threat to the European project and is running in parallel to what is happening in Britain.

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Oh come on Paxman, they are world champions at marching backwards

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Jeremy Paxman has attacked the cheese-eating surrender monkeys.

French is a “useless language” and the nation’s achievements are “long past”, Jeremy Paxman has claimed, in a brutal attack on our European neighbours.

The former Newsnight host said that middle-class Britons should end their “forelock-tugging” deference to France’s haute cuisine and high-speed trains, as he claimed that the centuries-old battle between the two nations had been comprehensively decided in Britain’s favour.

Writing in the Financial Times, Paxman said French was a “useless language”. He wrote: “Let us block our ears to the middle-class English and their forelock-tugging deference to France’s highly subsidised rural living, high-speed trains and ‘marvellous food’.

“No one is going to deny that, historically, France has enhanced civilisation. European culture would be a thin thing without Montaigne, Descartes, Debussy and Cézanne, to say nothing of the dictator’s dictator, Napoleon Bonaparte.   Read more »

Photo Of The Day

(FILES) - Picture taken on January 20, 2004 in Toulouse (southwestern France) shows Frenchman Andre Bamberski holding a picture of her daughter Kalinka Bamberski who was allegedly raped and murdered by her German stepfather doctor Dieter Krombach in 1982. Krombach was found on October 18, 2009, wounded and tied up in front of Mulhouse courthouse (eastern France). He has been put under police custody as well as Bamberski who was oddly present in the area. AFP PHOTO / REMY GABALDA (Photo credit should read REMY GABALDA/AFP/Getty Images)

Picture taken on January 20, 2004 in Toulouse (southwestern France) shows Frenchman Andre Bamberski holding a picture of her daughter Kalinka Bamberski who was allegedly raped and murdered by her German stepfather doctor Dieter Krombach in 1982. Krombach was found on October 18, 2009, wounded and tied up in front of Mulhouse courthouse (eastern France). He has been put under police custody as well as Bamberski who was oddly present in the area. AFP PHOTO / REMY GABALDA (Photo credit should read REMY GABALDA/AFP/Getty Images)

Kalinka

When 14-year-old Kalinka was found dead in 1982, her father Andre Bamberski, a quietly-spoken man, took the law into his own hands. For three long decades Andre Bamberski waged a tireless campaign to win justice for the daughter he was sure had been murdered. Pretty, sports-mad Kalinka, 14, was found dead in suspicious circumstances.

The abduction of Dr. Dieter Krombach began in the village of Scheidegg, in southern Germany. His three kidnappers punched him in the face, tied him up, gagged him, and threw him in the back of their car. They drove 150 miles, crossing the border into the Alsace region of France, with Krombach stretched out on the floor between the seats. The car stopped in the town of Mulhouse.

An accomplice called the local police and stayed on the line just long enough to deliver a bizarre instruction: “Go to the rue de Tilleul, across from the customs office,” the anonymous caller said. “You’ll find a man tied up.” A few minutes later, two police cars arrived at the scene, their red and blue patrol lights illuminating the street. Behind an iron gate, in a dingy courtyard between two four-story buildings, Krombach lay on the ground. His hands and feet were bound and his mouth was gagged. He was roughed up but very much alive. When the police removed the covering from his mouth, the first thing he said was “Bamberski is behind it.”

The French septuagenarian André Bamberski to whom Krombach referred was, on the face of it, an unlikely kidnapper. Until 1982, he had been a mild-mannered accountant and the adoring father of a lively young girl, Kalinka. That year, Kalinka attended a French-language high school in the small German city of Freiburg, as a boarder, and spent most weekends and summers in nearby Lindau, with Bamberski’s ex-wife and her new husband, Dieter Krombach.

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Hitler’s Germany revived in France

When you import a Jew-hating culture you cannot be surprised when they turn on them. Hitler’s Germany has been revived in France thanks to France’s suicidal immigration policies.  Not only have scenes identical to Hitler’s reign of terror been re-enacted inside France, Palestinian protesters – who liberals like to say are anti-Israel and not anti-Jews, have made their hatred of Jews destructively and verbally clear.

France’s politicians and community leaders have criticised the “intolerable” violence against Paris’ Jewish community, after a pro-Palestinian rally led to the vandalizing and looting of Jewish businesses and the burning of cars.

It is the third time in a week where pro-Palestinian activists have clashed with the city’s Jewish residents. On Sunday, locals reported chats of “Gas the Jews” and “Kill the Jews“, as rioters attacked businesses in the Sarcelles district, known as “little Jerusalem”.

Manuel Valls, France’s prime minister said: “What happened in Sarcelles is intolerable. An attack on a synagogue and on a kosher shop is simply anti-Semitism. Nothing in France can justify this violence.”

…Francois Pupponi, the mayor of Sarcelles, told BFMTV that the violent attacks were carried out by a “horde of savages.”

“When you head for the synagogue, when you burn a corner shop because it is Jewish-owned, you are committing an anti-Semitic act,” interior minister Bernard Cazeneuve told reporters at a press conference at the local synagogue.

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