France

French criminalise moral arguments because of psychological pressure

Recently I wrote about French censors banning an ad that valued the lives of people with Down Syndrome. They banned it because they didn’t want to upset French women who had aborted their baby because of the syndrome. In France 96% of pregnancies that involve a down syndrome child end in abortion. The French have now turned their attention to those who value all human life and who exercise their freedom of speech in order to try to protect it. In a world where we should have a free marketplace of ideas they want to protect women from moral pro-life arguments because they might feel pressured to keep their baby.

The truely sad irony of this attack against freedom of expression is that French government allows  Jihadist websites to exist with no criminal sanctions at all. It seems that a pro-life argument is a criminal act because it might make someone feel bad enough to let a baby live but a jihadi website dedicated to pro-death arguments to persuade people to kill non-Muslims is perfectly acceptable. The French have lost the plot. They protect their women from hurty feelings but not from Islamic terrorists plotting death and destruction.

PARIS, December 2, 2016 (LifeSiteNews) –The socialist government of France passed a bill after one day’s debate that criminalizes websites that might dissuade women from abortion.

The “digital interference” bill is aimed at cracking down on French websites that would, in the words of the bill, “deliberately mislead, intimidate and/or exert psychological or moral pressure to discourage recourse to abortion.”

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France v New Zealand

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Bonjour!

Finally a game at a sensible time.  You should be getting ready with the croissants and deep rich cup of caffeine.

Game starts 9:05 – pop the bragging guesses in before game start.

Remember, no game chat of any kind in General Debate, even when the game is already complete.  Some people may be watching it delayed.  Thaaaaaaaaank U!

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France bans advertisement that values children with Down Syndrome

A French advertisement that is called “Dear Future Mom”shows expectant parents that people with Down syndrome live a happy and fulfilling life. It is a beautiful representation of the value of all lives. We have all read about the black lives matter movement and the white lives matter movement but this clearly is an ad that promotes the value of the lives of children who have Down Syndrome. The message is that their lives matter but the French censors disagree. They have called the video inappropriate and have banned it.

Judge for yourself

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They may march backwards but sometimes they are cunning

The cheese eating surrender monkeys might be the world champions at marching backwards but their politicians are sometimes very cunning.

Nicolas Sarkozy on Sunday crashed out of the race to elect a Right-wing nominee for next year’s presidential election in France, after François Fillon, a Thatcherite with a Welsh wife, came a spectacular first ahead of Alain Juppé.

The race to pick a nominee for the Republicans party has sparked huge interest as the winner is likely to meet – and defeat – Marine Le Pen, leader of the anti-EU, anti-immigrant Front National, in the definitive presidential run-off next May.

The ballot was open to anyone willing to pay €2 who professes agreement with the values of the centre-Right.

In a surprise outcome, Mr Fillon was on course to finish far out in front in round one.

With almost 9,000 out of 10,000 polling stations counted, Mr Fillon was on 44.1 per cent, Mr Juppé on 28.2 per cent and Mr Sarkozy well behind on 21 per cent.    Read more »

A Frog who probably won’t march backwards

The anger from voters shown in the US is just the tip of the iceberg. In Europe, there is likely to be a bigger backlash against the sopping wet liberals who are putting nations at risk.

Marine le Pen is likely to received a big boost, despite media saying otherwise.

What might be the knock-on effect in Europe of Donald Trump’s victory? The next big democracy to vote after America is France, which holds its presidential election next spring. Could Marine Le Pen, leader of the populist National Front (FN), be elected president?

Before the American result, the question seemed absurd. Polls have suggested for months that she would do well enough to secure one of the two second-round places at voting next April. This in itself would be a victory of sorts, repeating the achievement of her father, Jean-Marie Le Pen, in 2002. But no polls have indicated that she could beat the centre-right candidate likely to face her.

Now, the unthinkable has become conceivable. There was no disguising the delight in Paris at the FN headquarters. A jubilant Ms Le Pen, who had argued that a Trump victory would be good for France, congratulated the American president-elect and praised the “free” American people. “It’s not the end of the world,” she declared, “but the end of a world.” Her lieutenant and party strategist, Florian Philippot, summed up the mood at the FN: “Their world is collapsing; ours is being built.” Even Mr Le Pen, who has fallen out with his daughter, tweeted: “Today the United States, tomorrow France!”   Read more »

Cheese eating surrender monkeys march backwards on carbon tax

Carbon Tax

The Cheese eating surrender monkeys are marching backwards on carbon tax.

The French government is set to drop plans to introduce a carbon tax, French financial daily Les Echos said on Thursday.

The newspaper, quoting several sources, said the socialist government will not include the carbon tax in a draft 2016 budget update currently being discussed.

Environment Minister Segolene Royal had said in May that France would unilaterally introduce a carbon price floor of about 30 euros ($33) a tonne with a view to kickstart broader European action to cut emissions and drive forward the December 2015 United Nations-led international climate accord.

The plan had pushed power prices higher in the spring.

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The Paris you know or remember from visits or brochures no longer exists

 

While no part of Paris looks like the romantic Cliches in Hollywood movies, some districts now resemble post-apocalyptic scenes of a dystopian thriller. This footage, taken with a hidden camera by an anonymous Frenchman in the Avenue de Flandres, 19th Arrondissement, near the Stalingrad Metro Station in Paris as well as areas in close proximity, shows the devastating effects of uncontrolled illegal mass immigration of young African males into Europe. Read more »

Photo of the Day

A Spectacular Murder Rocks France.

A Spectacular Murder Rocks France.

An Affair to Remember

On the evening of March 16, 1914, Henriette Caillaux was ushered into the office of Gaston Calmette, editor of Le Figaro. . . .

Mme. Caillaux wore a fur coat over a gown strangely formal for a late afternoon business call. Her hat was modest, and a large furry muff linked the two sleeves of her coat. Henriette’s hands were hidden inside the muff.

“Before Calmette could speak she asked, ‘You know why I have come?’ ‘Not at all, Madame,’ responded the editor, charming to the end.

From her furs the visitor produced a Browning automatic pistol and fired six times. Calmette fell to the floor clutching his abdomen.

As office workers closed in, she warned them not to touch her.

“Don’t touch me. I am a lady,” Henriette Caillaux barked at those trying to restrain her. The well-dressed woman had just pumped six bullets into Gaston Calmette, editor of the right-leaning French newspaper Le Figaro. An impassioned Caillaux couldn’t bear the politically scandalous and personally embarrassing details that the journalist had been printing about her husband. So she donned a gown, bought a pistol, and headed for Calmette’s office. Bleeding and bewildered, her victim muttered, “I only did my duty,” as he was carted off to the hospital, where he died later that night.

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Photo of the Day

The 47 suitcases seized by police in a private residence at Villeneuve at the Seine Assize Court during the trial of French mass murderer Dr Marcel Petiot. The cases contain clothes which were identified by relatives of some of his victims. (Photo by Keystone/Getty Images)

The 47 suitcases seized by police in a private residence at Villeneuve at the Seine Assize Court during the trial of French mass murderer Dr Marcel Petiot. The cases contain clothes which were identified by relatives of some of his victims. (Photo by Keystone/Getty Images)

Dangerous Lunatic

The Monster of Rue Le Sueur

Meet the French doctor who promised Jews safe passage from Nazis, only to rob and murder them

To all who knew him, he was the most devoted, benevolent doctor in Nazi-occupied Paris. Dr Marcel Petiot provided free care for the poor and risked his life helping persecuted Jews flee to safety.
Or so everyone thought – until locals in his affluent neighbourhood reported a foul stench from his home and thick black smoke pouring out of his chimney in March 1944.

Nazi-occupied Paris was a terrible place to be in the waning days of World War Two, with Jews, Resistance fighters and ordinary citizens all hoping to escape. Disappearances became so common they often weren’t followed up.

And one man used the lawlessness for his own terrible purposes, killing perhaps as many as 60 people.

Petiot’s criminal career stretched from his teenage years to his mid-life, and ran parallel to a successful military, political, and medical career. He was a real life Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde.

The inherent grisliness of murder makes it hard — if not impossible — to describe any murderer as “better” or “worse” than another. Still, Marcel André Henri Félix Petiot was truly superlative in his horror, mainly because of the circumstances and motivations behind his acts: He promised safety and freedom to those leaving Nazi-occupied France, only to strip them of their possessions and lives.

Despite his infamy in France, many elsewhere have never heard his story. As with many serial killers, internal struggle marked much of Pétiot’s early life.

Born on January 17th, 1897, he was the son of a civil servant, and his uncle, Gaston Petiot, was a professor of philosophy at the College of Auxerre. From childhood he showed signs of violence, after he strangled a cat after plunging its legs in boiling water.

However, he showed great intelligence, at 5 years old he was reading like a 10-year-old child. He then was found distributing obscene images when he was eight. Interned at St. Anne for a psychiatric disorder, his mother died when he was 12, he was then subsequently sent to several schools for discipline, but exhibited severe behavioural problems in school and was expelled several times before completing his education.

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Photo of the Day

Mademoiselle Blanche Monnier: May 23, 1901, a police commissioner forced the door of a house from Poitiers and discovered in a dark room with shutters locked a woman lying on a bed in the midst of filth. Immediately a rumor through the city: the unfortunate Blanche Monnier, was kidnapped by his family for twenty-five years, following a thwarted love. The national press got hold of the news, and L'Illustration does not hesitate to publish a monstrous picture, which shows a gaunt creature, with abundant black hair hiding her nakedness.

Mademoiselle Blanche Monnier: May 23, 1901, a police commissioner forced the door of a house from Poitiers and discovered in a dark room with shutters locked a woman lying on a bed in the midst of filth. Immediately a rumour through the city: the unfortunate Blanche Monnier, was kidnapped by her family for twenty-five years, following a thwarted love. The national press got hold of the news, and L’Illustration did not hesitate to publish a monstrous picture, which shows a gaunt creature, with abundant black hair hiding her nakedness.

The Miserable Incarceration of Blanche Monnier

A Truly Sad, Despicable, Wretched Story about a Poor Young Woman

Do you ever feel a little bit claustrophobic from sitting the office a bit too long?

Now, imagine you were confined to a room smaller than your cubicle for 25 years. There is no light, no central heating or air conditioning. The only food you eat are scraps from someone else’s table and your only friends, the rats who scavenge what little crumbs that fall to the stony floor. Mademoiselle Blanche Monnier experienced this for a quarter of a century. The most shocking thing about this? It was Blanche’s mother who imprisoned her.

While it looks like something from an old horror movie, the above is a real photo taken in 1901 of Blanche Monnier, a French woman who was imprisoned in a padlocked room for 25 years prior to being discovered. Monnier was initially imprisoned by her mother and brother because they didn’t approve of her marrying an attorney she was in love with. Years later, even after the object of her affection had died, the mother and brother still refused to free her.

May 23, 1901, following a denunciation by an anonymous letter, the Attorney General of Poitiers ordered a search of Louise Monnier, widow of a former dean of the Faculty of Letters. On the second floor of a mansion from the city center, the central Commissioner discovered a skeletal woman, completely naked, lying on a rotten bench amid his excrement. This is White’s daughter, Mrs. Monnier. It would be sequestered by his family for twenty five years…

This discovery ignited the city. How, indeed, imagine that a mother can have the barbarity of locking his daughter to abandon the hunger and suffering? How imagine that such torture can last a quarter century without anyone cares? What crime had committed the unfortunate to suffer such a punishment?

The press immediately seized of the news. While different organs Republicans and monarchists take the opportunity to settle accounts, a journalist from the local press overcomes their quarrels to conduct its own investigation.

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