Grant Robertson

Cartoon of the Day

Credit:  SonovaMin

Credit: SonovaMin

Tell him he’s Dreaming

David Cunliffe reckons he is going to hang on to the leadership after losing the election.

David Cunliffe would like to remain Labour leader and take the party into 2017 election, even if the party loses at the September 20 election.

“In general and with any new leader you go through a learning curve,” he said.

“I think there is a very strong argument that it would be a waste of time, energy and resources to go through that process and start again.”

Asked if he planned to stay on, no matter what the result, he said he did, “unless I feel like I have done such a bad job that it would be in the interests of the party for me not to put myself forward – if that questions arises.”

Doesn’t he know Robbo is doing the work rounding up caucus and the unions?   Read more »

Hooton on Labour’s Next Leader

Matthew Hooton has written an article in the NBR talking about who could be the next Labour leader.

He speaks of centrist candidates Stu Nash and Kel Davis as potential leaders if they can win their seats.

Depending on how their electorate races go, two names would emerge: Labour’s candidates in Te Tai Tokerau and Napier, Kelvin Davis and Stuart Nash.

Both live and breath Labour values but are reasonably centralist, in the John Key mode.  Both have played for the parliamentary rugby team, drink beer out of the bottle, are married to women and have kids.

If Mr Davis makes it back to parliament, he will have defeated the formidable Hone Harawira and kept Ms Harre, Ms Sykes and Mr Minto out.  By working hard at the local level over two elections, Mr Nash will have overturned National’s massive 9108 majority from 2008.  Both will have done it by getting National voters to tick red.

In Mr Davis’ case, he would become the first Maori leader of a major political party.  For Mr Nash, he would be seeking election as prime minister in 2017, exactly 60 years after the last Nash, his grandfather Walter, took Labour to power.  Moreover, in Labour’s centenary year, the grandson of Michael Joseph Savage’s finance minister would be leading the party towards power.  If they worked together, a Nash/Davis ticket would be a dream team.

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Does Alastair Scott Actually know what his electorate boundaries are?

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National’s Wairarapa candidate, Alastair Scott, has had to defend himself against accusations he doesn’t live in his electorate so can’t vote for himself.

Mr Scott confirmed during a radio election programme featuring himself and Labour candidate Kieran McAnulty that he is enrolled in Wellington Central, his primary residence being in Kelburn where he lives in a rented home with his partner Robyn Noble-Campbell and three of the blended family’s six children.

So he will be casting his party vote for National and his electorate vote for Paul Foster-Bell, the National Party’s choice to try to unseat Labour’s Grant Robertson.

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Can Grant Robertson Win an Election?

Grant Robertson has been trying to run the lard off his arse in an attempt to look more prime ministerial.

Being a podgy, glasses wearing, comfortable looking bloke who looks like as if he should be in a cardy and slippers does not inspire any great confidence.

The Labour Party seemed to share this view. The party membership voted against him at the last leadership election, with Grant winning only 26.71% of their vote, and only 17.30% from the unions.   Read more »

The left is waking up to the toxicity of Kim Dotcom and his cult party

While Kim Dotcom might like to chant “Fuck John Key” to his slavering minions and weirdo hipster crowd others are starting to find out all about Kim Dotcom and his fake political party.

The smart amongst the left are now starting to wake up and speak up.

Pablo at Kiwipolitco writes:

I came back from six weeks abroad to see the beginning of the Internet Party’s “party party” launches. It leaves me with some questions.

It seems that what the Internet Party has done is this. Using Kim Dotcom’s wallet as a springboard, it has selected a candidate group largely made up of attractive metrosexuals (only a few of whom have political experience), recruited as window dressing a seasoned (and also attractive) leftist female as party leader (even though she has no experience in the IT field), and run a slick PR campaign featuring cats that is long on rhetoric and promises and short on viable policies. The stated aim is to get out the apathetic youth vote and thereby reach the three percent electoral threshold.

The strategic alliance with the Mana Party makes sense, especially for Mana. They get additional resources to more effectively campaign for at least two electorate seats, especially given that it looks like the Maori Party is moribund and the Maori electoral rolls will thereby be more contestable even if Labour tries to reclaim its historical support in it. The Internet Party gets to coattail on Mana’s activism and the presence of relatively seasoned cadres on the campaign trail. Between the two, they might well reach the five percent threshold, although current polling suggests something well less than that. The lack of political experience in the Internet Party could be problematic in any event.

But I am still left wondering what the IP stands for and how it proposes to effect change if its candidates are elected. We know that the IP came about mostly due to Dotcom’s hatred of John Key. But Dotcom is ostensibly not part of the IP, which makes his attention-grabbing presence at its public events all the more puzzling. Leaving aside Dotcom’s background and baggage for the moment, imagine if major financial donors stole the stage at Labour, National or Green Party rallies. What would the reaction be? Plus, hating on John Key is not a policy platform, however much the sentiment may be shared by a good portion of the general public (and that is debatable).

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David Cunliffe and his travel troughing

David-Cunliffe-piggy

Yesterday Andrea Vance rightfully gave Paul Foster-Bell a swift kick in the goolies for his troughing.

There was another MP though that significantly increased his travel expenses during a selection battle…David Cunliffe.

The Cunliffe had a large spike in his air travel expenses during the Labour’s got talent contest and shortly after then his air travel spending appears to have returned to normal.

Jan 1 – Mar 31 2013 – $7,208

April 1 – June 30 2013 – $8,538

July 1 – 30 Sept 2013 – $14,071

Oct 1 to Dec 31 2013 – $20,909

Jan 1 – Mar 31 2014 – $8,493

All this makes Grant Robertson’s attack on National yesterday somewhat an own goal.   Read more »

Herald and tainted Journo continue to run lines for Kim Dotcom

The Herald and David “tainted” Fisher continue to shill lines on behalf of Kim Dotcom.

They have run a story today about some supposed new “evidence”.

Government minister Jonathan Coleman knew the FBI was interested in Kim Dotcom before his officials granted the tycoon residency – a revelation which has led to accusations he misled the public.

The accusation comes after Immigration NZ released a statement making it clear they told Dr Coleman about the FBI the day before the criticial residency decision was made.

Dr Coleman – now Defence Minister – is now facing calls to come clean on exactly what he was told the day before Dotcom was granted residency by Immigration NZ officials.

It emerged last week Dotcom was given residency in 2010 despite the SIS urging Immigration NZ to tell their minister the FBI was carrying out a criminal investigation into him and wanted the help of NZ Police.

Dr Coleman was briefed by Immigration NZ chief executive Nigel Bickle on October 28, the day before Dotcom was granted residency.

Dr Coleman distanced himself from the decision, saying it was made by officials. He said: “Ministers had absolutely no knowledge of any pending FBI-NZ Police investigation.”   Read more »

Wellington Young Feminists, Tania Billingsley, and how this is NOT political?

This, from the Wellington Young Feminists Facebook page

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This is what the Wellington Young Feminists team are pushing out right now.  A petition to get John Key to apologise to Tania for…. not looking sufficiently interested, I guess?  Wasn’t that the original charge?

Seriously, these people are destroying any credibility that they had.

This is a serious case of hysteria.

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RAPE is terrible!   Read more »

Josie Pagani on Labour’s woes

Last night on The Cauldron, Josie Pagani elucidated precisely what it was that is costing Labour this election.

She has written a post about it and what Labour must do to arrest the sinking polls.

First, stop blaming the media.

The problem isn’t ‘right wing framing’. There isn’t a media conspiracy to get a third term National government. When you fall behind everyone airs their favourite explanation and negatives get repeated and amplified. It’s the job of politicians, not media, to inspire a change in the story.

There is also no point blaming whoever went public at the weekend to criticise David Cunliffe for going on holiday. It was poor discipline, but poor discipline is not the main reason the party is 30 points behind National.

Politics isn’t fair. Even if  the media is sometimes unfair (such as when the Herald went too far with unsubstantiated claims of undeclared donations from Donghua Liu), one of the things the public are judging is how you behave under pressure. Stop complaining.

Unfortunately for Josie the Donghua Liu donations weren’t unsubstantiated. I suspect there is more to play out on that. She is right though in the folly of blaming the media, but they just can;t help themselves.

David Cunliffe just yesterday was claiming smears and media beat ups, and his loyal mouth piece and donation launderer Greg Presland was on the Standard claiming a smear about his visit and cozy lunch with NZ’s Rolf Harris.

Stop saying the polls are close. It reminds voters that Labour aims to lead a bloc in which it might not be all that dominant and which could include the toxic Dotcom party. Tortuous explanations about the Left Bloc v the Right Bloc sound cynical, as if you don’t care about winning support of people.

Distance Labour from Dotcom. One reason for Labour’s poor polling is people just want to get rid of Dotcom and somehow he has become Labour’s problem now. Only because he is an enemy of our enemy.  Labour should only ever say of Dotcom, “he shouldn’t be in the country and National should not have let him in. We want him and his party nowhere near government.”

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