Grant Robertson

Who is Andrew Little? How long does Little have to increase Labour’s polls?

littleangryandy

Labour have gone through four leaders in the past seven years, and are now on to their fifth.

This suggests that Andrew Little needs to be watching his back, or keeping it against the wall if Grant Robertson is around.

Robertson engineered the dumping of David Shearer with some beautiful low bastardry that impressed the VRWC.

This was all without Robbo copping the flack for doing the back stabbing. Shearer’s mid 30s poll ratings a year out from the election gave Robbo the chance to move his forces to stare down Shearer and force a leadership election.     Read more »

So gambling is OK with Labour when it isn’t SkyCity

Labour continues to show their rank hypocrisy when it comes to gambling.

They constantly bang on about SkyCity as if they are evil incarnate, but happily run raffles, attend racing events and show a general preference to all other forms of gambling other than pokies inside a casino in the nation’s largest city.

Here is Grant Robertson and Andrew Little making complete dorks of themselves at the Wellington Cup.

Congrats to Grant Robertson for managing to make Andrew Little look like a sinister back stabbing weirdo when everyone knows that it is Robbo who is the back stabber.

little&robbogogambling Read more »

Josie Pagani has bigger balls than all our MSM and the rest of the left-wing blogosphere

I like Josie Pagani, she is an honourable lefty, and someone who actually has her head screwed on right.

She has written a post at Pundit which puts the rest of the left-wing blogosphere and all of the mainstream media to shame.

Her courage should be applauded.

[T]his must be crystal clear – Charlie Hebdo, the editorial team, the cartoonists and the staff are not to blame for their own murders.

The brave and just response to the Paris murders is to stand up for freedom of speech –  no buts, no qualifiers.

Some will use the slaughter in Paris to whip up anti-Islamic sentiments. Marine Le Pen, France’s far-right leader, has already compared Muslims in France to the German occupation of the 1940s. George Packer of the New Yorker fears ‘today might very well be the day that Marine Le Pen became President of France.’

Her attempt to demonise all of Islam is tactical and ugly. The majority of muslims are peaceful and live comfortably alongside christians, jews and atheists. Anyway, the tactic of terror is to provoke a backlash against all Islam and vindicate their teaching of victimhood.

Le Pen’s views must be rejected.

But it is also true that an extremist faction of Islam does not want to live in peace and believes that purity can only be realised by killing infidels and moderate muslims.

These ideas and this barbaric strand of Islam must be named and shamed. It is just as important to stand up for the Kurdish muslim woman in combat gear fighting for her right not to wear a hijab, as it is to stand up for the right to wear one on the streets of Sydney and not be attacked.

Read more »

Minor Losers, Ctd – Grant Robertson – 3rd in the Party Vote

- TVNZ

– TVNZ

Grant Robertson was one of the major losers of 2014, failing in his bid for the leadership for a second time.

He was beautifully knifed by Phil Twyford, in a great play by an otherwise unknown politician.

This doesn’t qualify him as a minor loser.    Read more »

Lesser Known Winners & Losers of 2014

philtwyford

The MSM and lesser known bloggers like to give out big gay lists of awards for political winners and losers in 2014 and often miss out on some of the most interesting stories.

So we will cover some of the winners and losers this year that haven’t really made it into the public eye.

I mean everyone else has labelled John Key politician of the year except Jane Clifton, who awarded that to me. The lists aren’t even interesting anymore.

Time for a change.   Read more »

Some words of caution for Andrew Little and Labour, but will they listen?

Tony Alexander, in his latest newsletter, has some words of caution for Andrew Little and the Labour party about the path they have embarked on.

Last week I noted that there are some trends which people (businesses I suppose, truth be told) should keep an eye on. These included growing wealth inequality and employers exploiting staff. Perhaps this latter thread is one of the motivating factors behind the new Leader of the Opposition’s announcement that he will set up a two year “Future of Work Commission”. The intention is that this project will examine changes in the way people work via numerous workshops and extensive contact with various groups. The risk is that it ends
up being a grumpy free for all for all and sundry so the first task of the work which Grant Robertson will lead is to tightly define what they wish specifically to focus on and go from there.

Good luck to them because one outcome of the GFC is an altered relationship between employers and employees. But more than that whole new industries and jobs have appeared, there is more casualisation and contracting, and a generation of people have come through the education system and entered the workforce with minimal awareness of what unions can offer them. And that union movement suffers greatly from being associated with exactly that – a politically motivated always Labour-supporting “movement” rather than true representation of employee concerns.

These are early days for the re-elected National government and early days for the latest Labour Party leader, so the thrust of changes in the employee-employer relationship for the next three years is still likely to be in the direction of further empowering the former. But employers should keep an eye on the building undercurrent of discontent among the working poor in particular, what the Aussies call the “battlers”, and where possible seek input into the new Commission.

Read more »

Cartoon of the Day

Credit:  SonovaMin

Credit: SonovaMin

We picked the sherrif, but we don’t wanna pick his deputy

Grant Robertson has retired hurt

In the hurricane of media that accompanied Andrew Little’s elevation – inevitable with any new leader – it would be easy to overlook runner-up Grant Robertson sitting stunned in the eye of the storm.

Yet Little’s next steps now become crucial. Handling Robertson and the party’s “second power base” will be a key issue for Little as he puts his new team together.

In the immediate aftermath of Little’s win Robertson understandably expressed disappointment.

He had, after all, won 56 per cent of the caucus, 55 per cent of the party membership and it was only Little’s status with the affiliated unions (and perhaps an echo of the gay-shy stance of some unionists evident during the 2013 run-off) that thwarted his second bid for leader.

But he expected the union vote to go against him, and Little’s three-to-one advantage with the handful of private sector unions affiliated to Labour was in line with feedback both camps had received.

What must have surprised Robertson’s camp was the unexpectedly low vote from his fellow MPs. His lieutenants were expecting him to clean up by about 21-11 on a two-man preferred basis, with most if not all David Parker’s second preferences going his way.

We’ve seen the photos.  Grant and Cindy were devastated.  But now comes the hard part.  Because of Grant’s lower than expected support in caucus, he may not end up as deputy leader.   Read more »

Gower backstabs Little less than 24 hours in the job

No love from TV3 Labour cheerleaders over Little it seems

Labour’s preferential voting system, combined with the backing of three-quarters of the union vote, saw Mr Little sneak through in what 3 News political editor Patrick Gower is calling “the great union ripoff”.

“It’s a backdoor takeover by the unions. Simply, Andrew Little would not be Labour leader without the unions,” Gower said on Firstline this morning.

“He is the unions’ man; Little is a union man, and the unions have got their man into Labour’s top job.”

Gower says it’s ironic after trying “almost too hard” to give men and women an equal say – the ultimately doomed ‘man ban’ – that a small group of “union blokes” have effectively chosen the party’s new leader.

“Most of those delegates, according to one of the most senior sources in the Labour Party, are men
 It’s just six unions out of about 150-odd in New Zealand. Just six of them get to have their say over this, and five of them actually rely on delegates – the union bosses, the union chiefs, the union heavies. They say who they want.”

Having known Mr Little for 15 years, Gower says he represents a change in tack for the party, which has seen its share of the vote drop for three consecutive general elections.

“He is a straight-shooter, he speaks really directly, there won’t be any of this flowery language or hesitation or showmanship that we’ve seen from previous Labour leaders. The reality is he’s a hard bugger, and he’s going to need all of it to really crack some heads in that Labour Party and to take on John Key.”

What follows next is quite gob smacking – Gower undermines Little, who isn’t even 24 hours in the job – and puts his support behind a reworked Grant/Jacinda ticket Read more »

Tears of impotent rage over union backed win of Andrew Little

There are plenty on the left who are crying tears of impotent rage at the union backed win of Andrew Little.

None more so that poor wee Andrew Geddis, the man who can’t bear to speak my name.

Labour just made the wrong choice, in the worst possible way.

Obviously, I think that the decision to choose Andrew Little over Grant Robertson was the wrong one however it came about 
 that’s because Grant is a good friend whom I think will one day make a fantastic Prime Minister of New Zealand. So Andrew Little could be the reincarnation of Jack Kennedy mixed with Bob Hawke by way of Michael Joseph Savage (which he most certainly isn’t) and I’d still be lamenting the Labour Party’s decision to appoint him leader ahead of Grant.

So let’s put aside my personal disappointment at the actual decision that Labour has made and instead look at how it has done so. Because it looks to me like it’s created an almighty cluster&*k.

Nah let’s not…Andrew should cry some more his tears are delicious.

First, Little beat Grant by just over 1% of the weighted votes cast. That’s about as close a margin of victory as you can get, achieved on the third round. So the overall mandate for Little’s leadership is 
 fragile, at best.

Second, Little lost heavily to Grant in both the Caucus and the Membership vote in every successive round of voting. Little was the first choice to be leader of only four of his colleagues (assuming he voted for himself, that is). Only 14 of 32 backed him as leader over Grant by their third choice – meaning 18 of 32 think Grant is a better person to lead them. And in respect of the membership vote, Little was consistently 10% behind Grant at each stage of the vote.

The thing that gave Little the edge, of course, was his support amongst “affiliates” – which means those unions that still retain membership ties with Labour.    Read more »