Grant Robertson

Where is Grant’s Aspiring Deputy Leader?

Jacinda Ardern has been conspicuous by her absence on Firstline on Friday morning.

This is odd behaviour in the middle of a leadership campaign, especially when Jacinda is apparently her ticket’s trump card.   Read more »

My good friend Brian Edwards on Labour’s leadership prospects

My good friend Brian Edwards seems to have gotten a second wind, or found some luncheon sausage because he has written two posts in as many days.

Yesterday he analysed the leadership prospects.

He seems to have lost some of his old circumspection.

His thoughts on Andrew Little:

I simply don’t believe that the country is ready for a grim-faced former union leader to be Prime Minister or to be this country’s envoy overseas.

Nanaia Mahuta:

Nanaia Mahuta has already conceded that she’s unlikely to win the race and she is to be admired for her honesty.

Which is a really back handed way of saying she is tits. That really is the most spectacular damning with faint praise I have seen in a long time.  Read more »

Cartoon of the Day

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Credit: SonovaMin

Brian Edwards on Labour’s leadership struggle

My good friend Brian Edwards gives his 10 cents worth on Labour’s leadership struggle.

It would have been nice if the Labour Party caucus had just been able to get together and pick a new leader, following the departure of David Cunliffe. That would have been the tidy way of doing things – a secret ballot, no dirty laundry washed in public, no protracted taking of soundings from all and sundry, no overt competition between the aspirants.

Let’s not do that then! Too sensible. Too easy. Too quick. Too like the way the National Party does things. And look where that got them.

So when the unions and the membership and the caucus have been consulted and weighed up the respective merits of the four contenders, there’ll be a new leader ready to take on John Key and the Nats.

Not an easy job when three out of four New Zealand voters just made it crystal  clear that they didn’t want a bar of you. And even less easy when you’ve just made it plain as a pikestaff to the electorate that no-one in your caucus stands out as the obvious, unchallengeable, next leader of the party. And certainly not Nanaia Mahuta, Andrew Little, Grant Robertson or David Parker.

Uh oh…all is not right in the Edwards household…perhaps the luncheon sausage ran out.

It’s not that they’re unintelligent or palpably untrustworthy or – as far as we know – have deep dark secrets waiting to emerge from the abyss like Kafka’s beetle. No, it’s just that three of them are dull and the fourth is interesting for the wrong reason.

No X-factor, no pizzazz, no charisma, no capacity to generate excitement. Oh for a Kirk, a Lange, a Clark. Good lord, even Geoffrey Palmer could play the trumpet!

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The Labour Party really have no clue…

The Labour Leadership race made it to Nelson last night.

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That’s the crowd.

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Cautious Labour leaders are all very quiet this time ’round

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We couldn’t get them off our screens and out of the newspapers last time this sideshow occurred.  This time, they’re all quietly ‘listening’ to ‘their’ people.

In fact, one refused to talk to media altogether.

Where they did pop out of the woodwork, people were left stunned.

What Labour’s first Prime Minister, Michael Joseph Savage, would have thought of his party’s demise and recent squabbles is anyone’s guess, but David Parker felt the need to summon his spirit.

“He would be saddened by our loss of connection with working New Zealanders because the Labour Party was born of working men and women for working men and women,” he says.

Mr Parker says his message is simple – he wants to reconnect the party with working people.

“… just like National”, he forgot to add.

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Comment of the Day

From yesterday’s Back Chat.

George shows his wisdom:

How the NZ Herald reported the Labour Caucus support for the four leadership contenders.
“Support amongst Labour MPs for the party leadership has Grant Robinson just ahead of David Parker with 11 and 9 supporters respectively and both were some way ahead of Nanaia Mahuta and Andrew Little with 6 supporters each”.
How it should have been reported.
66% of the Labour Caucus don’t want Robertson, 72% don’t want Parker, 81% don’t want Mahuta and 81% don’t want Little.

Which is totally true.

The bottom line is this for Labour…they are rooted, their caucus highly factionalised and at war with each other and the party is similarly fractured.

All a new leader will do is add a very thin veneer to the crumbling facade of a party that seems it won’t make it to its centenary.

The whole article from Audrey Young read as a space filler for the paper after an advertiser cancelled a spot.

Basically it can be summed up as a summary of mediocre and less than talented troughers all trying and failing to get a majority in caucus.  But with the picture placement it certainly looks like we know where the Herald stands on the leadership debate. They had a lovely photo of two young vibrant socialists who look to have been untroubled in their lives by pesky things like having to have had a real job. Read more »

Why the Labour Leadership race is broken

If there’s one thing the Labour leadership contenders agree on, it’s that the Labour Party needs to change.

And there is your problem.  For each candidate to stand out and make a clear difference over the other, they have to artificially come up with different ways to “fix” Labour.

During this year’s campaign, Mr Robertson said it was obvious Labour had lost its connection with people.

“We need a new generation of leadership, we need to do things differently,” he said.

“Labour must be a voice in the community every single day, not just when we show up at election time asking for a vote.”

Labour must campaign 3 years.

Ms Mahuta said Labour needs to have honest conversations within its membership.

“Only 25 per cent of people that voted for us and believed in the message that we had,” she said.

“This is about how greater New Zealand responds to who we are and what we stand for, and whether or not we’re listening to them.”

Let the Labour Party members tell us what to do.

Mr Parker said Labour’s spent far too much time over the last six years talking about itself.

“If we can agree on a unity of purpose, we will get strength and confidence from it and success will breed success and people will come back to us.”

Labour needs to figure out what it stands for.   Read more »

Now we know why MPs are members of unions, so they can get multiple votes

When moderates complain about Labour, they’re told they can join and have their say.

But will it be an equal say?

No. Because unionists and special interest groups, the very people corroding the party, get more than one vote.

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No wonder things just keep getting worse. Talk about a failed attempt at democracy!   Read more »

Will Winston do a Deal with Grant Robertson?

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Grant Robertson is running a pretty slick campaign.

It is certainly better than his opponents, and is talking about lots of the right things.

His big problem, however, is finding a route to victory. How does Robbo get 50% +1 of the votes in Parliament.

It would be a very, very brave or foolhardy person to predict that Robertson could find a route to victory without including New Zealand First in his coalition. To include New Zealand First he first needs to get Winston Peters to agree to do a deal with him.

Robertson realises this.

Build confident and mature relationships with other parties that we can form a government with in 2017.

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