Grant Robertson

Labour’s leadership battle will look like 300

300-soldier-blood

Labour’s leadership battle is shaping up to be an epic re-run of the battle scenes in 300.

Blood and guts everywhere.

It’s going to be awesome.

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Cunliffe is tits at fundraising

On election night and the day after Labour’s worst election result in more than 80 years David Cunliffe claimed that Labour has no money.

He was using that as an excuse for the loss.

What Cunliffe forgot is that the people most responsible for fundraising are firstly the leader. If people don’t like you then raising money is doubly hard. As we have seen 75% of the voting population decided to cast their votes elsewhere and that is due in a large part to the unlikeability of David Cunliffe.

Secondly the President and General Secretary are also responsible. My Labour sources, both inside Fraser House and in the wider party tell me that fundraising efforts were vetoed or blocked by Tim Barnett and/or Moira Coatsworth. At the same time they refused to fundraise themselves, thinking it was beneath them.

David Cunliffe has been dead set useless as Labour leader. He has managed to tank Labour’s vote to an undeniably bad level.

One of the worst parts of Cunliffe’s leadership, just as it was with Phil Goff and David Shearer’s leadership, is their inability to raise money.

Instead of working their guts out like Don Brash did to rebuild National’s war chest Cunliffe blames everyone else.  Read more »

Dimpost on the left’s slaughter

Danyl McLauchlan writes about the slaying of the left.

  • The National Party is an incredibly well resourced, well managed, professional political party and it turns out that these things counted for a lot last night.
  • The phone was not off the hook for Labour. Twelve months ago, just after Cunliffe won the leadership of his party Labour were on 37% with the Greens on 12%. There’s a cliche that oppositions don’t win elections, government’s lose them, but Labour lost this election. Cunliffe is probably the worst campaigner in New Zealand political history.
  • Based on the preliminary figures I think turnout will end up being slightly higher than last time but still very low. I was a strong advocate for a strategy of having left-wing parties try and improve their vote by targeting and mobilising younger voters, but it turns that that strategy is electoral suicide! Sorry guys!
  • So the lesson from last night’s right-wing landslide seems to be that older New Zealanders are very engaged with the political process and younger New Zealanders are not. That’s a shame but it’s a message politicians cannot ignore. No one’s going to waste time and energy chasing ‘the youth vote’ again for a very long time.

Youth don’t vote, ever. A few Nat MPs I know don’t bother chasing this vote, the effort required for the payoff means you are better off working elsewhere.

  • I think that the best way forward for Labour is for Cunliffe and ‘the old guard’ – Goff, Mallard and King – to resign. They’ve been at war for six years now and they’re tearing their party apart. I doubt this will happen though. The civil war will drag on for another parliamentary term. That party is dying.

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Labour’s Leadership Problem

Cunliffe - Sh_t

Labour had a shocker of a campaign, which all started when they didn’t do any proper polling or focus groups on their leadership contenders last year.

Arts, Travel and Lifestyle Blogger David Farrar interrupted his hectic world travel schedule to do the kind of research Labour needed to do on Cunliffe last year and was consistently saying he had very high negatives and he would tank Labour’s vote.

For Labour to be relevant again they need to start by doing the kind of research our pinko mate did and find out who can actually connect with Middle New Zealand.

Cunliffe has proven he can’t.

Robertson has similar negatives, so it might be time for Labour to look at someone that actually can reach out to middle New Zealand.

 

Grant Robertson can’t lay claim to the leadership. He massively lost the party vote on the night in his electorate…coming a distant third.  Read more »

Cartoon of the Day

Credit:  SonovaMin

Credit: SonovaMin

Has Grant triggered the Labour Party panic button?

Their internal polling must be going to the dogs if he’s scared Labour’s #2 won’t get back in on the list!

Grant says Jacinda and Plughead are losers

If Labour drop another couple of percent in the party vote, and two or three of the Labour star performers take their electorate, like Nash and Davis, they could very well face a the reality of having no list MPs at all.

A Labour party without it’s finance shadow minister?  A Labour party without Jacinda Ardern?

It’s is a reality, and Grant Robertson knows it.

Cartoon of the Day

Credit:  SonovaMin

Credit: SonovaMin

Tell him he’s Dreaming

David Cunliffe reckons he is going to hang on to the leadership after losing the election.

David Cunliffe would like to remain Labour leader and take the party into 2017 election, even if the party loses at the September 20 election.

“In general and with any new leader you go through a learning curve,” he said.

“I think there is a very strong argument that it would be a waste of time, energy and resources to go through that process and start again.”

Asked if he planned to stay on, no matter what the result, he said he did, “unless I feel like I have done such a bad job that it would be in the interests of the party for me not to put myself forward – if that questions arises.”

Doesn’t he know Robbo is doing the work rounding up caucus and the unions?   Read more »

Hooton on Labour’s Next Leader

Matthew Hooton has written an article in the NBR talking about who could be the next Labour leader.

He speaks of centrist candidates Stu Nash and Kel Davis as potential leaders if they can win their seats.

Depending on how their electorate races go, two names would emerge: Labour’s candidates in Te Tai Tokerau and Napier, Kelvin Davis and Stuart Nash.

Both live and breath Labour values but are reasonably centralist, in the John Key mode.  Both have played for the parliamentary rugby team, drink beer out of the bottle, are married to women and have kids.

If Mr Davis makes it back to parliament, he will have defeated the formidable Hone Harawira and kept Ms Harre, Ms Sykes and Mr Minto out.  By working hard at the local level over two elections, Mr Nash will have overturned National’s massive 9108 majority from 2008.  Both will have done it by getting National voters to tick red.

In Mr Davis’ case, he would become the first Maori leader of a major political party.  For Mr Nash, he would be seeking election as prime minister in 2017, exactly 60 years after the last Nash, his grandfather Walter, took Labour to power.  Moreover, in Labour’s centenary year, the grandson of Michael Joseph Savage’s finance minister would be leading the party towards power.  If they worked together, a Nash/Davis ticket would be a dream team.

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Does Alastair Scott Actually know what his electorate boundaries are?

Otane

National’s Wairarapa candidate, Alastair Scott, has had to defend himself against accusations he doesn’t live in his electorate so can’t vote for himself.

Mr Scott confirmed during a radio election programme featuring himself and Labour candidate Kieran McAnulty that he is enrolled in Wellington Central, his primary residence being in Kelburn where he lives in a rented home with his partner Robyn Noble-Campbell and three of the blended family’s six children.

So he will be casting his party vote for National and his electorate vote for Paul Foster-Bell, the National Party’s choice to try to unseat Labour’s Grant Robertson.

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