Green Party

The Green Party in the UK are “spiteful, malicious toddlers”

The Green party are the same the world over.

Their members are well meaning if somewhat deluded, but the politicians and parties themselves are crazy lunatics who have blood on their hands through their disastrous policies.

The Green party is having a bit of a surge in the UK at the moment and they are the real danger rather than the UKIP.

People are starting to wake up.

Reading the depressing news from Greece this morning, most Britons would be forgiven for imagining: “Couldn’t happen here.” A not-terribly-post-Communist politician is about to become prime minister, by promising that which is both arithmetically and politically impossible.

Well: beware Greeks bearing nonsense on stilts. Couldn’t happen here? Look again. Britain already elects Green Party representatives who can make Syriza seem like the thoughtful mainstream. Welcome to the city of Brighton and Hove, where the Green Party has been in power since the 2011 council elections.

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Syriza’s leader named his son in honour of Che Guevara? That’s nothing. Here’s Ben Duncan, at the time the Green Party councillor for Queen’s Park ward, on June 28 last year, tweeting about a memorial to the Armed Forces: “Armed Forces Day has certainly brought the hired killers onto the streets of #Brighton today. Hard to explain to my son!”

It certainly would be hard to explain to a son why he shouldn’t spit in such a father’s face, but I don’t think that was Mr Duncan’s suggestion. The local Green Party asked him to resign as a Green, or something – they have no formal whipping system – but he remains a councillor, and, as far as I can tell, continues to “work” for Green MEP Jean Lambert for which we – the taxpaying “we” – pay him something like thirty grand a year.

Brighton voters will have been less surprised than most, then, to hear Natalie Bennett, the Greens’ national leader, rhapsodising over her plans to convert the Army into some sort of counselling service.

That’s the thing about the Greens. They react in horror when one of their footsoldiers is caught being explicit over an idea – soldiers=killers, for example – to which their national policy is hardly antithetical. The only substantive difference I can see between Duncan and Bennett is that he was caught sneering, while she’s still allowed to pretend the drivel in her manifesto is just light-hearted, and “fresh and new”, as she put it at the weekend.

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Is Metiria Turei trying to take the mantle of the Nasty Party off Labour?

Evil Kermit

Metiria Turei has had a mad rant at Ratana in the annual pilgrimage of politicians to get lectured at by people who will never vote for you.

Greens co-leader Metiria Turei launched a stinging attack on John Key in his absence at Ratana today, saying his view of New Zealand’s history was “warped, outrageous and deeply offensive”.

She also said Mr Key was a prime example of the “ignorant, uneducated Pakeha” economist Gareth Morgan had talked about the day before.

Ms Turei took aim at Mr Key’s recent comments that New Zealand was settled peacefully and that Maori would have welcomed the capital European settlers brought.

“The Prime Minister’s warped and outrageous view of history is deeply offensive to Maori but it also undermines decades of effort by Maori and Pakeha, including even by his own Government, to address some of the historic wrongs and encourage an understanding of New Zealand’s true history.”

Ms Turei had intended to make the comments in a speech at Ratana Pa, but time shortage meant she did not get the chance to speak.

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Greens are crazy the world over…and evil

We all know how crazy our Greens are. We also know that Green policies actually kill people, like the victims of Australian bushfires killed by Green policies preventing back-burning in cooler months.

The election int he Uk is proving interesting, mainly for two reason…the crazies of the UKIP and the really cray types in the Green party.

James Delingpole explains:

Many years ago, when I was a young diarist working for the Daily Telegraph’s Peterborough column, my bosses dispatched me to cover the Green Party conference. This wasn’t because I was particularly anti-Green at the time. Rather it was because, of all Peterborough’s staffers, I was known to be the one least interested in politics and the political process, so it seemed entirely appropriate to send me to the big joke event in the conference season, rather than to one of the more serious events.

The only thing I remember about the event was being inveigled into some fringe activity in which I was forced to participate with various Green delegates in some kind of non-competitive group bonding exercise where we all had to roll about on the floor. Someone let out the most repellent fart. It smelt evil but everyone present politely conspired to pretend that everything was normal. I sense something similar going on right now in the collective efforts of the media chattering classes to present the Green Party as a viable, vibrant and credible force in UK politics in the approach to the General Election.

Classic Delingpole sledging.

He continues to explain why he thinks they are evil and wrong.

Apparently the Green Party’s membership has now overtaken UKIP’s. I’m quite prepared to believe this but I think it says more about the fiendish zealotry of the sort of people attracted to environmental causes than it does about the Green Party itself. It’s not as though the Green Party has suddenly gone and recruited a brilliant, inspirational go-ahead new leader – au contraire: see Nathalie Bennett, below – nor as though it has undergone some manner of dramatic, Clause 4 style, policy reinvention.

Nope. It’s just that of all the parties, the Greens are the one whose target market accords most closely with the kind of people who flock to sign Change.Org petitions and join Twitter mobbings and go out on street demos (or better still, attend week-long protest camps where they can smoke dope, get to use the yurt and possibly get to rub shoulders with Vivienne Westwood). These people are signers, joiners, astroturfers. As a percentage of the population they are quite small but in terms of exerting political pressure they punch far above their weight by being highly committed and – for a bunch of dope-smoking crusties – surprisingly well organised. This Green Party membership surge is just another part of that strategy. I don’t believe that it will translate into anything significant at the polls.

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More proof Labour and Green messages were as pointless as they were ineffective

The constant barrage during election year that people couldn’t afford to live due to increasing prices, especially on food, was paraded regularly.  The removal of 15% GST on fresh fruit and vegetables was even a policy plank for two parties.

Why did the electorate not react?  Could it be because in spite of Labour and the Greens with the help of a compliant media telling New Zealanders that they were really badly off, not enough actually saw this in their own pockets?

Monthly food prices have edged up in latest official statistics, led by more expensive fruit and meat, while dairy products fell.

The food price index rose 0.3 percent in December, following November’s 0.5 percent and a static October, according to Statistics New Zealand.

The index was 1 percent higher than December a year earlier.

That’s 1% of food inflation for the whole of 2014. Read more »

Will Labour run on a Financial Transaction Tax?

Labour have a finance spokesman who has never worked in the real world, and basically has very little idea about finance.

It wouldn’t be surprising if he did what the Democrats are doing now they are in opposition, and promote a Financial Transaction Tax.

To pay for the plan, the U.S. would impose what Van Hollen called a tiny fee on market transactions, of 0.1%. A Democratic aide said the fee would apply to any buy or sell transactions, and include stocks, bonds and derivatives. The plan would also limit tax deductions on CEO pay above $1 million.

So far this type of tax has only been promoted by the looney left, in the form of the Alliance and Jim Anderton, Mana, and the Greens.

5. Financial Transaction Tax

The Green Party will:

  1. Involve New Zealand with the group of countries working to agree on a tax on international currency movements, to set up a fund to provide capital for poor countries to improve their social and environmental wellbeing. This would discourage currency speculation without being high enough to impede genuine trade.

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Paid to Win – Simon Lusk’s Guide to Campaigning Part II Which Party?

Simon Lusk is one of the few full time political campaigners in New Zealand, and is releasing a practical guide to campaigning in New Zealand, “Paid to Win“, one chapter at a time.

His second chapter is titled “Which Party” and gives advice on which party aspiring politicians or political activists should join.

This chapter deals with which party to join, why minor parties never effect real change, why a safe seat matters, and other factors in deciding when and where a candidate should run.

Simon’s views on the likelihood of a successful career in a minor party are spot on, and while the Greens will howl with rage his comments about them are spot on.

When I first started getting to know good political operators inside Labour I mentioned that Labour had an inherent advantage because they had the Greens.

Under MMP National do not have any strong coalition partners, while Labour have the Greens.

The response to this statement was telling. I was asked emphatically, “Have you ever worked with the Greens?” I had not, but filed this away for future reference.  Read more »

Labour: don’t trust the government

via RNZ

via RNZ

Parliament will begin a wider review of the security and intelligence agencies in 2015 following rushed law changes to clamp down on freedom fighters.

Recent publicity and fears surrounding beheadings and threats by the jihadist group Islamic State have resulted in new restrictions on individual freedoms.

Really?   In a practical sense?   Anyone not been able to go to the dairy?   Or play golf?   What are these freedoms that have been restricted?   Read more »

Revisiting Green party press releases

In 2008 the Green party issued this press release:

The Green Party is warning that today’s record breaking crude oil price of US$100 per barrel is just the first flirtation in what is going to be a long term relationship with triple digits in an ongoing trend of rising oil prices.

The price of oil reportedly surged during the first trading day in the New Year with light sweet crude rising US$4.02 to US$100 a barrel in New York.

“The era of cheap oil has been over for some time. While today’s price breaks a psychological limit, the long term trend indicates that oil may not be consistently priced this high until July or August. However, that’s very short time in planning terms and it is extremely urgent that we re-examine our budget priorities for roading, public transport and freight,” Co-Leader Jeanette Fitzsimons says.

While today’s price of US$100 did retreat soon after breaking the record, prices will never retreat back to the lows of just a few years ago.

“While there isn’t any need to panic, it is a clear signal that we should be planning for an oil constrained future. This means changing the way we get around, investing in more public transport and better urban design that supports walking and cycling. You only need to look at the major cities around the world that were built before the oil age to see that vibrant, exciting lifestyles are possible without depending on the private motor vehicle.

“If you read my latest Bill to be drawn, Climate Change (Transport Funding) Bill, you’ll see a phased programme for refocusing priorities towards more sustainable transport and reducing our reliance on fossil fuels.”

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Hate to admit it: Labour and Greens are right about New Zealand’s inequality

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There you are.

OECD data.

Hard facts.  Can’t escape them.   Read more »

The hypocrisy of Andrea Vance

Andrea Vance was at great pains to keep her door swipe card data private, she also refused to cough up texts and phone records between her and a minister.

But now in true typical media and left-wing hypocrisy she is demanding the PM coughs up his texts.

In the vaults of Archives New Zealand lies a unique collection of several thousand fading letters, photographs and papers. The Nash Collection offers a window into a world gone by.

Former prime minister Sir Walter Nash became involved in local politics from his arrival in Wellington in 1909. His personal papers are a treasure trove of information about World War II, the birth of the New Zealand Labour Party, as well as every noteworthy issue of the day.

Without them, a hole would exist in the nation’s historical record.

From the same building, chief archivist Marilyn Little will soon start an investigation into the deletion of Prime Minister John Key’s text messages.

Her inquiry stems from a request by the Green Party. It is a spot of political point-scoring, exploiting Key’s embarrassing friendship with hit-job blogger Cameron Slater. But politicking aside, the investigation is truly important.

In the age of the spin doctor, we now rarely know what a politician really thinks. Their response to a crisis is packaged up into palatable soundbites for news bulletins. Biographies, sympathetically penned by acolytes and admirers, have become another election campaign weapon.   Read more »