Health

This is why we need a FBT

This is why we need  Fat Bastards Tax, that taxes the fat bastard not the fat or the sugar.

I’ll just bet fat bastards will soon start demanding the NZ government funds this new drug.

A treatment of injections that can help people lost a stone more than they normally would by dieting or exercising more has been approved by health watchdogs.

Liraglutide, which has been described by doctors as life-changing, could be available on prescription in months.

Slimmers typically lose almost a stone more than they would by simply watching how many calories they consume and doing more exercise.

Trials showed that some severely obese patients lost so much weight they were able to abandon their wheelchairs and walk normally for the first time in years.

Liraglutide also lowers blood pressure, raises good cholesterol and prevents diabetes.According to its makers, Novo Nordisk of Denmark, the drug even produces a ‘feel-good factor’, making dieting a pleasure.But some experts have already warned it does not provide a long-term solution to the growing problem of obesity in Britain.

Novo Nordisk will apply for it to be prescribed on the NHS after Friday’s ruling by the European drugs regulator that it is safe and effective.

There are fears however that Nice – Britain’s drugs rationing body – will judge it too expensive for routine use on the NHS.

Liraglutide costs from £2.25 a day, which is roughly double the price of Orlistat, the only other prescription diet drug.

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HPA wowsers at it again

The Taxpayers’ Union have released documents yesterday showing the wowsers over at the Health Promotions Agency have spent up $1.2 million on their batshit crazy No Beersies campaign.

“The Taxpayers’ Union had feedback that the ‘Not Beersies’ ads were making people thirsty for beer. Some participants in the Agency’s own focus groups said the same – that the ads encouraged drinking or were confusing.”

And encouraging kids to have a few handles too by the looks of this picture.

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“The documents show that the campaign had the least positive impact on entrenched, high-risk drinkers, and instead targets those least likely to face harm from alcohol consumption. The HPA spent at least $1.2 million on the campaign, but has refused to say how much taxpayers paid in advertising agency fees. It also shows that the HPA conducts no cost benefit analysis on its campaign.

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State media the same the world over

State media seems to be the same the world over.

Left wing activist journalists pushing their own agendas or the agendas of weirdos.

The ABC’s 7.30 has come under fire after airing a story on US vaccination rates that failed to declare one of the interviewees was a high-profile anti-vaccination campaigner and head of a “natural” health care business.

US-based James Maskell, CEO of Revive Primary Care, was introduced only as a concerned parent in the segment presented by reporter Jane Cowan and introduced by Leigh Sales.

Maskell later appeared to say on Twitter that he had told producers from the outset of his professional interest in the issue.

However, at no point in the segment was this mentioned, nor was he identified in on-screen text.

In addition, a transcript of the program on the ABC’s website, appears to have been altered to read “James Maskell, Anti-Vaccinationist”.    Read more »

2014 was a bad year for homeopathy

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On Saturday we had a lively debate about homeopathy, so I thought I’d do some more digging on the topic.

There were lots of weird links chucked about, nothing of any empirical nature.

I found a sensible link, with pesky things called facts, scientific fact. It seems homeopathy had a bad year last year.

[2014] has been a bad year for homoeopathy, first there was the Draft Information Paper on Homoeopathy from the NHMRC, which concluded there was no reliable evidence for the use of homoeopathy in the treatment of the 61 health conditions looked at. Then a homoeopathic remedy manufacturer left the North American market due to law suites over the ineffectiveness of their products, then the Federal Court has found that Homeopathy Plus! was engaged in misleading conduct over its homoeopathic “vaccines”

Quoting from the ACCC website “…[Homeopathy Plus!] engaged in misleading and deceptive conduct and made false and misleading representations to the effect that there was an adequate foundation in medical science for the statement that homoeopathic treatments are a safe and effective alternative to the whooping cough vaccine, when in fact no such foundation exists..”

However, this is not a one-way street. Complementary Medicines Australia has claimed, 6 months after the public consultation process had closed, that the NHMRC process was flawed. In the august publication Food Navigator Asia it was claimed to be “fatally flawed”.

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Anti-fluoride weirdos upset at proposed law change

Anti-fluoride weirdos are outraged at a proposal before government to clarify the law regarding fluoride…ironically that came about as a result of their appeal.

Anti-fluoride campaigners are alarmed at a “sinister” move to slide through a law change over Christmas, validating councils’ power to add the chemical to drinking water.

Medsafe opened public submissions on November 25 on a law change to stop fluoride being legally defined as a medicine – meaning it can be added to municipal water supplies. The deadline for submissions is this Friday.

The law change comes after a High Court justice said the law needed clarification, as he ruled against an appeal by anti-fluoride groups to stop fluoride being added to water.

David Sloan, the director of anti-fluoridation lobby group New Health New Zealand, said the Ministry of Health was rushing the law change. But the organisation’s request to extend the timeframe for submissions outside of the Christmas and New Year period was dismissed by the Ministry of Health.

“We’re a voluntary organisation and all have jobs, so to expect us to put together a good submission in that timeframe is terrible,” Sloan said. “This is kind of a sinister move by the Ministry of Health.”

The change comes after New Health New Zealand sought a judicial review against the Attorney General, arguing that fluoride was subject to the Medicines Act.     Read more »

Katie Hopkins: what fat people need is a kick up the arse

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Katie Hopkins is at it again…speaking the truth.

Of course useful taxpayer funded troughers like Boyd Swinburn and hi pals would say that her attitudes are outrageous and if they could just have more funding they could design some new taxes to tax people thin.

The bottom line is Katie Hopkins is right…fat people do need a kick up the arse.>

Katie has just finished filming My Fat Story, a two-part series for the TLC television network, for which she piled on 4st (half her body weight) and ate her way through a staggering 13 ready meals daily to prove how easy it was to shed the pounds. “I’ve always criticised fat people, so I decided to put my money where my mouth is,” says the newly slimmed-down Katie, who believes that obese people are the architects of their own misfortune.

She has little sympathy with the recent EU ruling on obesity as a disability. It’s her belief there’s too much “sympathy, tea and tears” around Britain’s spiralling obesity epidemic, which costs the NHS more than £6 billion a year. “All fat people want is an excuse,” she says. “But fatties have the one thing disabled people don’t have. They have choice. Nobody’s forcing them to shovel food in their faces.” If she sees a morbidly obese person in a disabled parking bay, Katie plans to have this very conversation with them. “The institutions keep offering excuses but what fat people need is a kick up the a—,” she says.

Poverty or lack of education are no defence. “We went to Aldi, did the shop and proved the point,” she says. Katie, who believes there is no such thing as a happy fat person – they’re simply in denial – was appalled to discover recently that some British mothers were feeding their offspring liquidised Chinese and Indian takeaways. “You sit there and you go, ‘No! It can’t be true!’ ” she says. “But that’s what’s going on outside our cutesy little bubble.”   Read more »

Comment of the Day

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Pete (not ours, the other) had a pearler this morning

As I was eating crayfish last night I was wondering who is feeding all those 10,000s of starving kids we keep hearing about who are living in poverty over this xmas New years break while the schools are closed?

I haven’t read any reports of them turning up in droves at A&E suffering from malnutrition …or are they only starving when politicians are not on holiday???

Photo Of The Day

Photo: Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory Les' arms were made by the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory. Because they're attached directly to nerves in his shoulders, he operates them simply by thinking, as though they were the same arms he'd been born with (though he does have to shift each section of the arm one-at-a-time before "resting").

Photo: Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory
Les’ arms were made by the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory. Because they’re attached directly to nerves in his shoulders, he operates them simply by thinking, as though they were the same arms he’d been born with (though he does have to shift each section of the arm one-at-a-time before “resting”).

Les Baugh: First Double Amputee to Control Two Robotic Arms with His Mind

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Green taliban make up science and cost farmers and businesses billions

James Delingpole looks at the huge fuss caused by hippy ratbags once again manipulating and falsifying science to suit their own agenda, no matter the cost.

“‘Victory for bees’ as European Union bans neonicotinoid pesticides blamed for destroying bee population” read a front page headline in theIndependent last year.

It was the culmination of an intense burst of campaigning by left-wing pressure groups Avaaz, Change.org, Greenpeace, Friends of the Earth, BugLife and the Environmental Justice Foundation which erupted from nowhere last year.

One minute, no one had heard of “neonicotinoids”. The next, it suddenly seemed as though everyone knew for certain that this pesticide was responsible for the “colony collapse” devastating the world’s bee populations and that therefore it should be banned by the EU as a matter of urgency.

Among those who lent their weight to the campaign were the fashion designers Vivienne Westwood and Katharine Hamnett, the National Treasure Stephen Fry and dozens of activists charmingly and amusingly dressed in bee costumes. The impression given was that this issue was an absolute no brainer on which the jury of the wise, decent and informed had long since delivered their verdict: anyone who spoke up in favour of these evil chemicals was clearly nothing more than a science-denying bee-hating bastard in the pay of Big Pharma.

So why, almost instantly, did I smell a rat? Well apart from the obvious clue – any campaign involving Vivienne Westwood is, by definition, stupid, silly and wrong – there was also the matter of the unseemly haste with which these campaign groups were trying to force the legislation through. And the fact that the bully-mob tactics being used here were so redolent of the ones I’d seen elsewhere used by environmentalists to justify their scientifically dubious campaigns against everything from the forestry industry to the harmless trace gas carbon dioxide.

Green on the outside, red on the inside: that’s what these Watermelon campaigns are really about. So, with the help of investigative journalist Richard North, I began looking into the true story behind the ban.

What we found was appalling if not altogether surprising. The ban – heavily opposed by Britain’s then-Environment Secretary Owen Paterson – had rather less to do with proven necessity than it did with political horse-trading.

Indeed, the scientific evidence for justifying the ban seemed flimsy to the point of non-existence.

How then, could all these celebrities and campaign groups and environmental activists and EU apparatchiks and progressive media outlets (from the Guardian and the BBC to Huff Po) have been persuaded otherwise? On what kind of science were they basing their claims?

Well, now thanks to a happy internet leak we have our answer. It turns out that the “evidence” was cooked up at the suggestion of a cabal of activist scientists working for a supposedly neutral and independent environmental organisation called the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN).

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The left will probably want these to stop people from having legitimate right wing views

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The left wing thinks that alternate views to their wonky view of the world should be silenced.

They will probably want these to stop people from having legitimate right wing views.

An American company has produced a wristband that aims to instill good habits in people – by giving them an electric shock when they stray.

The Pavlok is worn like a FitBit bracelet, and can be activated manually or automatically through an app. Inspired by Pavlov’s theory – who trained his dogs to expect food every time a bell was rang – the app wearer is supposed to learn to avoid certain behaviour, or else an electric shock will be sent out from the band.

“The idea is everybody has these things they know they shouldn’t do,” said Maneesh Sethi, who created Pavlok. “If you start to add a small amount of shock when you do stupid things, you can mostly just increase the awareness of your activity in your daily routine. I like to say that for the last 1,000 years, we’ve tamed environment, but we haven’t tamed ourselves.”

Mr Sethi explained that, for instance, those looking to lose weight could shock themselves when their plate was half finished, to encourage themselves to stop eating. Or if you knew that you wasted too much time on social media, you could shock yourself to snap your attention away from the device.

He told The Daily Dot website that while activating the Pavlok manually might sound counterproductive to the aim of the device, his team’s research showed that self-applied shock is as – or more – effective than automated shock. Having the Pavlok on your wrist “opens up the awareness of your habits,” he claimed.

“It makes you ask yourself, wait, why am I hungry again?”

The shock is delivered at two milliamperes, which the manufacturers claim is neither dangerous nor excessively painful. The device goes on sale next year for $244 (£155).

 

– The Telegraph