Helen Clark

Helen Clark lies to Cunliffe over illegal spying

Labour leader David Cunliffe has been given assurances by former prime minister and party leader Helen Clark that New Zealanders weren’t been spied on under her leadership.

However he said there were still grey areas that need to be looked at regarding the allegations made by US journalist Glenn Greenwood and NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden.

Cunliffe was speaking at the University of Auckland this afternoon during a meet and greet with student supporters.

In response to intelligence and security inspector general Cherly Gwyn’s assertions that there was no evidence of mass surveillance on New Zealanders he said:

“There are a number of grey areas that New Zealanders want clarity on, like is meta data given the same protections as data?

“Do you need a warrant to access information about New Zealanders from third parties and is cyber security a easy way out around other protections?”

He said he has been given assurances by Clark that he had nothing to worry about.

“I have absolutely no indication that Labour has been involved in that in anyway. I have absolutely nothing I would be concerned about.”

Oh really?   Read more »

Probably the best summary of Dirty Politics yet

House Of Cards TV Series HD Wallpaper

Paul Thomas writes int he NZ Herald about Dirty Politics.

Millions have been splashed out and a pigsty’s worth of mud slung but what have we actually learned from this election campaign?

• Nicky Hagar knows a thing or two about marketing.

• Cameron Slater isn’t as nice as he looks.

• You can judge a minister by the company she keeps.

• While the Whale Oil cabal give the impression they’ve watched too many episodes of House of Cards, their machinations owe more to Walter Mitty than Frank Underwood.

• Hillary Clinton got the wrong Kiwi politician when she added Helen Clark to the select group – Keith Richards and cockroaches – that would survive nuclear Armageddon. She should have nominated Winston Peters.

• Contrary to Tana Umaga’s famous complaint, some people seem to think we are playing tiddlywinks here.

Fair points. I also like the picture of Frank Underwood in the article, and since we are talking about House of Cards…who is going to play Zoe?

The campaign has also reinforced that just as truth is the first casualty of war, irony is the first casualty of politics.

There was Internet-Mana’s Laila Harre on the TV news complaining about the media manufacturing a news story out of a private email (Hone Harawira foaming at the mouth about the Internet Party’s preoccupation with legalising cannabis).

That was followed by David Cunliffe complaining about the timing of the release of a damning New Zealand Institute of Economic Research assessment of Labour’s capital gains tax arithmetic and accusing Federated Farmers, who commissioned the report, of “playing politics.”

A month ago Cunliffe was hailing Hagar’s carefully timed intervention in the election, predicting it would “shift hundreds of thousands of votes”. One man’s political stunt is another’s welcome contribution to the debate.

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The Predictable Failure of David Cunliffe (Ctd)

Today’s polls are more bad news for Labour.

They rolled David Shearer when he had 34% of the vote.

The new messiah, David Cunliffe, has managed to lose them 10% of the vote since then.

This was very, very predictable. I have been predicting it for ages.

David Cunliffe is dead set useless, and Labour should have run some polls to see what the population thought of him before they selected him as leader. His negatives were seriously high to being with, so he was always going to tank Labour’s vote.

Having high negatives is not career ending. Helen Clark demonstrated this, when she managed to take Labour down to 14% in the polls, with a 2% preferred Prime Minister rating.     Read more »

“These are some of the most serious allegations I’ve seen”

Really?

That is what David Cunliffe has claimed.

Peter Cresswell at Not PC explains why this is a ridiculous statement from David Cunliffe.

“These are some of the most serious allegations I’ve seen,” said David Cunliffe this morning about allegations that bloggers Whale Oil and Cactus Kate wrote “attack blogs” at the behest of a paying client and a justice minister “gunning for” a minion.

This both overstates and understates the power of blogs – and downplays some of the most serious scandals of recent years. (Is he blind? Did Mr Cunliffe not see Helen Clark buying an election with her taxpayer-funded pledge card, then retrospectively legislating to make it all legal?  Or Don Brash dealing secretively with a small but well-funded religious cult?)

So a blogger wrote “attack blogs” about a bureaucrat.  How hurtful. How harmful. I’m amazed the poor fellow wasn’t hospitalised.  Just imagine, being attacked by a blogger!    Read more »

Phil Goff is a liar, but then we already knew that

RAT GOFF

I’ve stayed out of the drama yesterday.  It is clear that the media aren’t interested in the truth right now.  Much more fun joining the opposition MPs in the absolute barrage of lies masquerading as news.

In the end, Phil Goff’s day came to a bit of a nasty end as John Key told everyone why exactly Goff was off his rocker.

But it took a  lawyer to spot the true own goal made by Phil Goff last night:   Read more »

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Tears of impotent rage…Felix Marwick is upset he isn’t shaping opinion

Feel the tears of impotent rage from Felix Marwick, upset that he isn’t one of those shaping opinion in election year.

There’s nothing quite like an election campaign for getting tempers up, emotions raised, and judgements lowered. All of a sudden anything becomes a tool for political gain. This is something we all need to bear in mind over the next five and a half weeks before the election.

Those with vested political interests will scheme and manipulate in almost any way that suits their purposes.  We’re already seeing it happen.

Consider the manufactured outrage we’ve already seen over a couple of incidents. Firstly the “f**k John Key” chant recorded at an Internet Mana rally. This is not necessarily the degradation of society and an all time low in politics that some would have us believe. Believe it or not it’s actually not all that unusual for those of the younger generation to use coarse language about their political leaders. It’s been happening for generations. I recall chasing the then Tertiary Education Minister Lockwood Smith around Canterbury University campus back in the 1990s. The language we used was not exactly complimentary and was generally similarly used on any visiting government minister. Just ask Ruth Richardson how she was treated by protestors after her “mother of all Budgets”.

Abuse of politicians isn’t respectful, but it’s not unusual.

What is interesting; however, are those who point to the incident as some sort of political Armageddon and a sign of dirty politics of the left. I’m really not convinced that Cameron Slater can claim any moral high ground here, nor can David Farrar. It’s really a bit rich for someone who ran a billboard campaign against the Electoral Finance Act that compared then Prime Minister Helen Clark to totalitarian leaders to be drawing comparisons between the Internet Party, Dotcom, and Hitler. Dotcom may be many things (and some of them reasonably unsavoury) but to draw parallels between him and one of the most reviled figures of the 20th century is simply ludicrous.

No it isn’t ludicrous Felix, those billboards were legitimate political debate around an issue, the erosion of freedom of speech by a implementation of a draconian law enacted by a morally corrupt government sensitive to criticism. It was a policy debate not a ranty chant from a Fat German Crook. Clark was acting like a totalitarian, and so she got compared to other dictators.

Bear in mind the footage that raised so much ire had been floating around for at least a fortnight and had been previously reported on. Where was the outrage and criticism then? Or was it a deliberate strategy to draw attention away from the other hot story of the day – foreign ownership of New Zealand land?

It was floating around for weeks, but the mainstream media ignored it, swept it under the carpet, pretending desperately that it wasn’t a story. Unfortunately it was. The traditional filters from the media are now gone. News is what people think is news not what tired journalists in the Press Galley think is news.   Read more »

Helen’s photoshop fairy has been back I see

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And now for the movie star version:   Read more »

What has changed? There was a time the Labour Party LOVED the Chinese!

Dear readers, you are all wrong, just ask Fran O’Sullivan

Fran O’Sullivan looks like she has drunk the Dotcom Koolaid this morning.

She thinks that all of you are wrong and there is nothing wrong with the antics of Kim Dotcom and his paid hangers on.

‘Are you Red-dee for a Rev-Oh – Loo- Shin? Are you Red-dee to take down the Government? Are you Red-dee to extradite John Key?” The thick Germanic accent bellowing out these words will be burned into the brain of anyone with a compulsive interest in New Zealand politics after Kim Dotcom’s latest video went viral.

So too, the imagery of Christchurch students chanting “F … John Key, F … John Key, F … John Key” to the rhythm of Dotcom’s baton.

It’s important not to take too seriously the howls of outrage over Dotcom’s latest political orchestration. Or, for that matter the students’ antics.

Wake up people.

There is an election on after all.

There should be contest. There should be passion.

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Cunliffe makes a meal of Breakfast

The problem with David Cunliffe is that he can’t remember what he has said previously from one day to the next.

The one thing a pathological liar needs more than anything else is a good memory.

Today on Breakfast Cunliffe fell back down the memory hole.

Let’s start with his…ahem…flexiible…position on doing a deal with the Internet Mana Alliance.

Last week his position was this:

Labour leader David Cunliffe has denied he has double standards for refusing to rule out relying on the Internet Mana party to form a government despite deriding National for its coat tailing deals in Epsom and Ohariu.

Mr Cunliffe has accused National of manipulating voters by using the coat-tailing provisions to try to boost its support partners’ chances through electorate deals in Epsom and Ohariu.

However, he will not rule out calling on the Internet Mana Party if needed to form a Government.

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