Helen Clark

Phil Goff is a liar, but then we already knew that

RAT GOFF

I’ve stayed out of the drama yesterday.  It is clear that the media aren’t interested in the truth right now.  Much more fun joining the opposition MPs in the absolute barrage of lies masquerading as news.

In the end, Phil Goff’s day came to a bit of a nasty end as John Key told everyone why exactly Goff was off his rocker.

But it took a  lawyer to spot the true own goal made by Phil Goff last night:   Read more »

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Tears of impotent rage…Felix Marwick is upset he isn’t shaping opinion

Feel the tears of impotent rage from Felix Marwick, upset that he isn’t one of those shaping opinion in election year.

There’s nothing quite like an election campaign for getting tempers up, emotions raised, and judgements lowered. All of a sudden anything becomes a tool for political gain. This is something we all need to bear in mind over the next five and a half weeks before the election.

Those with vested political interests will scheme and manipulate in almost any way that suits their purposes.  We’re already seeing it happen.

Consider the manufactured outrage we’ve already seen over a couple of incidents. Firstly the “f**k John Key” chant recorded at an Internet Mana rally. This is not necessarily the degradation of society and an all time low in politics that some would have us believe. Believe it or not it’s actually not all that unusual for those of the younger generation to use coarse language about their political leaders. It’s been happening for generations. I recall chasing the then Tertiary Education Minister Lockwood Smith around Canterbury University campus back in the 1990s. The language we used was not exactly complimentary and was generally similarly used on any visiting government minister. Just ask Ruth Richardson how she was treated by protestors after her “mother of all Budgets”.

Abuse of politicians isn’t respectful, but it’s not unusual.

What is interesting; however, are those who point to the incident as some sort of political Armageddon and a sign of dirty politics of the left. I’m really not convinced that Cameron Slater can claim any moral high ground here, nor can David Farrar. It’s really a bit rich for someone who ran a billboard campaign against the Electoral Finance Act that compared then Prime Minister Helen Clark to totalitarian leaders to be drawing comparisons between the Internet Party, Dotcom, and Hitler. Dotcom may be many things (and some of them reasonably unsavoury) but to draw parallels between him and one of the most reviled figures of the 20th century is simply ludicrous.

No it isn’t ludicrous Felix, those billboards were legitimate political debate around an issue, the erosion of freedom of speech by a implementation of a draconian law enacted by a morally corrupt government sensitive to criticism. It was a policy debate not a ranty chant from a Fat German Crook. Clark was acting like a totalitarian, and so she got compared to other dictators.

Bear in mind the footage that raised so much ire had been floating around for at least a fortnight and had been previously reported on. Where was the outrage and criticism then? Or was it a deliberate strategy to draw attention away from the other hot story of the day – foreign ownership of New Zealand land?

It was floating around for weeks, but the mainstream media ignored it, swept it under the carpet, pretending desperately that it wasn’t a story. Unfortunately it was. The traditional filters from the media are now gone. News is what people think is news not what tired journalists in the Press Galley think is news.   Read more »

Helen’s photoshop fairy has been back I see

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And now for the movie star version:   Read more »

What has changed? There was a time the Labour Party LOVED the Chinese!

Dear readers, you are all wrong, just ask Fran O’Sullivan

Fran O’Sullivan looks like she has drunk the Dotcom Koolaid this morning.

She thinks that all of you are wrong and there is nothing wrong with the antics of Kim Dotcom and his paid hangers on.

‘Are you Red-dee for a Rev-Oh – Loo- Shin? Are you Red-dee to take down the Government? Are you Red-dee to extradite John Key?” The thick Germanic accent bellowing out these words will be burned into the brain of anyone with a compulsive interest in New Zealand politics after Kim Dotcom’s latest video went viral.

So too, the imagery of Christchurch students chanting “F … John Key, F … John Key, F … John Key” to the rhythm of Dotcom’s baton.

It’s important not to take too seriously the howls of outrage over Dotcom’s latest political orchestration. Or, for that matter the students’ antics.

Wake up people.

There is an election on after all.

There should be contest. There should be passion.

Read more »

Cunliffe makes a meal of Breakfast

The problem with David Cunliffe is that he can’t remember what he has said previously from one day to the next.

The one thing a pathological liar needs more than anything else is a good memory.

Today on Breakfast Cunliffe fell back down the memory hole.

Let’s start with his…ahem…flexiible…position on doing a deal with the Internet Mana Alliance.

Last week his position was this:

Labour leader David Cunliffe has denied he has double standards for refusing to rule out relying on the Internet Mana party to form a government despite deriding National for its coat tailing deals in Epsom and Ohariu.

Mr Cunliffe has accused National of manipulating voters by using the coat-tailing provisions to try to boost its support partners’ chances through electorate deals in Epsom and Ohariu.

However, he will not rule out calling on the Internet Mana Party if needed to form a Government.

Read more »

The logic of The Cunliffe

Yesterday David Cunliffe rushed of to make a statement about the conviction of John Banks, and his diminutive candidate in Epsom did likewise. Michael Wood defamed John Banks in his press release, Banks was found guilty of filing a false electoral return which is not electoral fraud as he claimed. But that is by the by. Both Cunliffe and Wood both think that because of something that John Banks did in 2010, standing as an independent in a local body election which he lost, somehow impacts on the Act party in 2014.

Labour Leader David Cunliffe said Mr Banks’ conviction “underlines a sorry chapter in our political history” and he should “accept his sentence and move on”.

“His conviction is also a reminder of the dodgy deal that kept him in Parliament over the last three years – and of the heavy-handed pursuit of the media by the police in its wake.”

However, with Prime Minister John Key this week saying he would again do deals with Act and United Future, “the National Party has learned nothing from this distortion of the MMP system”.

“National has been kept in power by a self-evident manipulation of our democratic process – relying on discredited and irrelevant support parties such as ACT and United Future which owe their place in Parliament to cups of tea and a nod and a wink.

“Labour will remove coat-tailing to make the electoral system fairer and more transparent.”

Basically their premise is because John Banks filled out a form incorrectly in 2010 when he wasn’t even a member of the Act party and subsequently was pursued by a convicted fraudster, tax cheat and blackmailer then sfor some reason people shouldn’t vote for  Act this election.

“You failed to disclose only two donations. There is nothing to suggest it was a pattern of offending,” Justice Wylie said.

But it was not a victimless crime, he said, the victim of the offending was the community at large.

Which is not particularly accurate, as John Banks at the time had lost the election and was then a retired politician and a private citizen.

Cunliffe’s claims were a long bow and he failed to draw it properly.  Read more »

Propaganda 104

I have been reflecting on my propaganda posts thus far and have realised that I have not clarified my belief that Propaganda per se is not inherently bad. My motivation is to explain how it is used to persuade and influence us so that we are not passive victims of it.

Propaganda can be used by organisations to do good by using its techniques to get a positive message across. It can be used in an honest or a dishonest way and it can be used to get a negative message across. Cropping photos to hide the background is a dishonest use of Propaganda if we lie about what was actually happening in the scene that was cropped. Photoshopping a Politician to look better however is a relatively mild deception that the average person would pick up.Helen Clark’s image is a great example. People said she looked great in the image but everyone knew that she didn’t really look like that.

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In school I was always one of those students who questioned everything. I took nothing at face value. I wanted to know the teachers’ bias so that I could adjust my judgement accordingly. When a female teacher who had never married and lived alone made strong feminist statements that were anti men, I weighed up the fact that her beliefs had possibly impacted on her ability to find a life partner as she was not gay. Perhaps then, I reasoned, her views were not healthy and went too far. I therefore rejected outright her more extreme views and gave careful consideration to the other points she made.

Another teacher was a wonderful and inspiring English teacher. I was very influenced by him and he encouraged me to become a teacher. However one day when I was in the seventh form we had a student teacher in the class for a week. He was quite good looking and I mentioned this to my teacher in a joking way when I was alone in the classroom with him. He responded that if I wanted him to he would introduce me to the young teacher who was finishing at our school that day. I knew that my teacher had got a 17 year old student pregnant when he was a young teacher and had married her so with that knowledge of his bias in mind I declined his offer.

We are bombarded with messages every day through advertising and through the media.If we understand that we are being sold to we are in a stronger position than if we are unaware of their purpose. If we question what we see and hear we can form our own conclusions. Being aware of bias means that we can make better decisions.

I am going to go all teacher on you and give you an exercise to do. I am going to give you a number of headlines from different Media sources about the Gaza conflict. My challenge to you is to try to ascertain the Media Bias from the headline. If there is a clear bias then the article is likely also to be biased.

NOTE: Some headlines may not contain bias they may simply be factual. Some contain emotive words while others do not.

Ask yourself how each headline makes you feel. Does it colour your view before you even start reading the article that would go with it?

Israel intensifies Gaza assault, Egyptians revise truce plan

Gaza fighting flares, UN, Israel debate truce

Shells hit UN school in Gaza, kill 15

Israeli shells hit second school killing 19, UN says

Gaza conflict: Israel ‘hits Jabaliya school refuge

Bombing damages Gaza’s Catholic parish school :

Gaza: ’100 Palestinians Killed In One Day’

European Jews face rising tide of anti-Semitism in Gaza

US-Israeli relations become more poisonous by the day

Death falls from the sky for eight children at Gaza camp

Israel posts footage from ‘inside Gaza tunnel’

UN Security Council calls for immediate Gaza ceasefire

Diary: The man ranting about ‘lies from Gaza’ is economical with the truth

Israel is finding it harder to deny targeting Gaza infrastructure

PLO announcement of 24-hour Gaza ceasefire disavowed by Hamas

Let cricketer Moeen Ali wear his ‘Save Gaza’ wristband

Israel undermining its support in the west, Philip Hammond says

Interestingly when doing my online search for Gaza headlines I did not come across any mentioning the rockets being sent into Israel or the damage and deaths that they were causing.

Also rather fascinating was this blog article I found, that was written precisely because of a headline.

It is a very revealing read as the writer objects to what he sees as a bias in the headline but to me I saw it as a clarification once more information came to light. However the new headline does not fit the Blog writers bias or world view so it upset him.

See how powerful a headline can be.

 

 

 

 

 

Bews-Hair vs Lewis – trouble in the Town Hall

As Labour’s next train wreck draws ever closer, here’s an angle that is worth keeping an eye on – a simmering, but growing feud between Auckland-based veteran political operatives, David Lewis and James Bews-Hair.

These two go back to the early-90s. They were on different sides of the broad church back then – Lewis a Clark loyalist and Bews-Hair donkey-deep with the likes of Phil Quin in the dirty tricks of the Moore/Goff camp. Despite this, they have always been as thick as thieves – until now that is.

I’m told things started to turn sour during the fallout from the Brown affair.

While Bews-Hair was quietly knifing people in the shadows, Lewis was strutting his prowess anywhere that would print it. To make it worse, Lewis promptly cut Brown adrift, whereas Bews-Hair continues to do his dirty work for him. Now things are about to get really nasty.

Labour will soon need a new leader, and just like the old days Lewis and Bews-Hair are going to be on different sides.   Read more »

Armstrong on Joyce and Cunliffe

John Armstrong critiques Steven Joyce’s virtuoso performance in the house where he rinsed Cunliffe.

Joyce took the first call in Wednesday afternoon’s general debate — long a platform for Parliament’s better orators — to parody Labour’s under-the-weather David Cunliffe in a fashion that was as clever as it was cruel as it was funny.

Within the space of a five-minute speech, Joyce had revealed another weapon in his armoury — the ability to cut an opponent down by sheer wit — and thereby further enhanced his credentials as the frontrunner for National’s leadership when Key finally moves on.

There was, however, another interesting outcome from his contribution — its impact on those sitting opposite him.

Cunliffe was not in the chamber. But those Labour MPs who were initially tried to ignore what was a virtuoso performance. But their barely suppressed smiles gave the game away.

If any group of people could do with a bit of a laugh it is Cunliffe’s colleagues.They have watched in increasing despair as their leader of just 10 months has virtually self-destructed and taken the party’s support down with him from the mid-30s to the mid-20s in percentage terms. Cunliffe is now very much marooned in a malaise from which it is almost impossible for a Leader of the Opposition to drag himself or herself out.

You can do nothing right. Every opinion poll just brings even more bad news. No one takes you seriously. You become the target of every cheap joke and jibe. The media spit on what remains of your dignity. The public write you off. In short, you are deemed to be terminal. You then wait for the firing squad — the knock on the door from a delegation of your MPs who have determined your use-by date has long passed and your ability to resuscitate your party’s flagging support is seen as likely as a squadron of pigs gliding past the Beehive.

Read more »