Helen Clark

“South Sea Poms” and “carping Kiwis”? Remember to thank Helen Clark

I have zero sympathy for Kiwis that go to Oz and then harp on about being second class citizens.  By all means lobby for change, but stop the whinging!

You knew the deal going in.

New Zealanders living across the Tasman have been labelled “South Sea Poms” and “carping Kiwis” after a survey showed they are Australia’s unhappiest migrants.

Kiwis were the migrants most likely to be dissatisfied with their financial situation, were often discriminated against, didn’t feel safe and were extremely unlikely to view Australians as nice people, a study by Melbourne’s Monash University found.

About 40 per cent of Kiwi migrants described themselves as “dissatisfied” or “very dissatisfied” with their financial situation. Forty-six per cent said they were poor, struggling or just getting by.

Kiwis were also the group least likely to see Australians as “caring, friendly, hospitable people”, only 1 per cent suggesting this was one of things they liked about their new country.

Kiwis were among the most suspicious of others, and just over a quarter said they had been discriminated against – more than twice the level among Brits.

The findings prompted Queens-land’s Sunday Mail newspaper yesterday to coin the phrase “carping Kiwis”, suggesting they had overtaken “whingeing Poms” as Australia’s hardest-to-please people.

Well, if you think about it, they weren’t happy here, so they left for Australia.  And once the hard realities of life appeared to exist in Australia as much as they do elsewhere, they just step back into their victim mentality.   Read more »

Kevin Rudd vs Helen Clark for the top UN job

How entertaining. Two massive megalomaniacs fighting each other out for the top global government role.

Former foreign minister Bob Carr believes the United Nations could do with a dose of Kevin Rudd’s “legendary forcefulness”.

There has been some speculation the former prime minister covets the UN secretary general gig.

The incumbent Ban Ki-moon finishes his second term in 2016.

While spruiking his memoir at a Sydney bookstore on Saturday, Mr Carr said Mr Rudd had his support.

“He would be a very strong, credible candidate,” Mr Carr said. “It would be the most natural thing in the world for him to stand.”

The race was wide open.

“I think the forcefulness Kevin showed sometimes in selling a case might be considered by some in the UN as an advantage,” Mr Carr said.

A lot of members of the UN general assembly liked Mr Rudd’s agenda and Australia’s international personality.

Hopefully they attack each others campaigns. That will be worth a big bucket of popcorn.   Read more »

Beware of the bunker mentality

Bunker_Entrance_Hitler

On Thursday evening the latest Roy Morgan poll came out. Normally I don’t comment on Roy Morgan polls, for a start they aren’t a member of the Market Research Association of NZ and their poll is all over the place showing massive swings for no apparent reason.

The only reasons that I comment on Roy Morgan polls is because it is the darling of the left-wing commentators who clutch at straws these days and because they tell us that they poll mobile phones, which is yet another bugbear of the left who think the indigent classes are left out from land line polling. There is not evidence at all to suggest this is the case, yet they persist with the urban myth. That, therefore, is why I comment on Roy Morgan…because the very things that the left uses to discount results of other polls that don’t suit their narrative don’t exist in Roy Morgan polls.

So, looking at left-wing commentary since the latest Roy Morgan it has been a struggle to see anything. save for the erudite musings of Chris Trotter, other than int he comments sections of the more popular left-wing blogs or on news sites.

The one thing that is apparent though is the bunker mentality of some.

Normally the left-wing blogs will crow about the Roy Morgan, now there is nothing but silence. Greg Presland even went out of his way to write a post that declared last week a win for David Cunliffe, despite his “cluster truck” policy being panned universally all week, their manufacturing policy launch slipping by un-noticed due to releasing it late on the day before a long extended holiday weekend and continued vocal criticism of their inept and wonky social media campaign that continues to deliver cock-ups and mis-steps. No mention of the poll still despite three days having elapsed…but plenty of time to write a post as to why Chris Trotter and Kiwi in America are wrong, dead wrong, and labour really is on the up and up.

Even Lynn Prentice felt so compelled to fill the void of political commentary that he wrote a lengthy post about how the servers operate The Standard, proving once again that he is the world’s greatest sysop. For a site with so little traffic they seem to have engineered themselves something Telecom would be proud of to run their enterprise.

The bunker mentality has set in, and it is bunker mentality that really takes its toll in politics. People hunker down, they ignore observable facts and details and continue to issue stirring announcements about great victories when the reality is they are pressed on all sides.

Comments dismissing polls and commenters with spurious reasoning shows this:

Pete it was one poll taken during the royal visit, Labour and the Greens went down and the right track wrong track rating went up by a similar amount to National’s increase. Wait for the next few polls and then have the discussion. Or do you think that we should cancel the election now and just let Key get on with it.

And do you always agree with Chris or just when he backs up your world views?

and;

Presuming it is valid, and RM does bounce around, it seems that the Royal Tour has had the desired effect …

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The seppos are looking at fart taxes now

We managed to defeat Helen Clark’s plans to impose fart taxes on the nations cattle.

The battle is only beginning in the US where a wider ranging fart tax is being proposed.

Last month, the President released a climate action plan designed to cut methane emissions.

If you are a cow, be afraid. Be very afraid.

The same goes for humans.

The plan outlines voluntary measures, such as a “Biogas Roadmap,” to reduce dairy sector greenhouse gas emissions by 25 percent by 2020. There’s concern though that these measures merely represent the tip of the iceberg.

Agriculture accounts for only about 8 percent of all greenhouse gas emissions from human activities. Within that 8 percent, the second largest source of agriculture emissions is enteric fermentation—the digestive process that leads to cow methane emissions, which are emittedin ways that are not appreciated at dinner parties. Methane emissions from enteric fermentation, while covering numerous livestock animals, are overwhelmingly from cows. Read more »

Clark as the architect of Labour’s woes

I have said for years that labour is deep trouble, and my reasoning has been that Helen Clark so dominated Labour in the late 90s and up until 2008 that she built the party in her image and required that those selected as MPs beneath her would never be of a calibre to ever challenge her. She maintained a strict ratio of the factions and indeed created more factions.

Once she left however the wheels started to come off the trolley.

Kiwi in America writes at David Farrar’s art, lifestyle, fitness and travel blog about this precise issue. It is TL;DR to most but I have taken the time to read it and found the best bit.

Cunliffe’s failings as LOO have been well canvassed on this and other right leaning blogs and in the mainstream media. They are real and look set to seal Labour’s fate in 2014 barring some catastrophic scandal from Key and the Nats. But really the premise of this essay is that Labour would be in this pickle regardless of who in the current caucus was the leader. Clark made sure that no charismatic rising star would ever make it to caucus or Cabinet to interfere with her goal of winning four elections and eclipsing Holyoake as the longest serving NZ PM in the modern party era. I alluded to one such person I met in my time in Labour who, absent Clark and the sisterhood’s purge, would be causing Key and National major heartburn if he were the LOO today. Clark dispatched him and many others like him. Look at Labour’s entire caucus. Who in there could seriously challenge Key? There is no one. Read more »

Is Simon Bridges really a future National leader? Ctd

If there’s one thing a Prime Minister has to be recognised for, it is being on top of their portfolios.

Helen Clark and Heather Simpson were all over ministerial portfolios like a rash. John Key is likewise at the top of the game, and while preferring a more managerial style, he certainly expects his Ministers to deliver on the workload expected of someone earning over $260,000 a year.

Leadership candidates need that sort of reputation to come through strongly right from the start.

In this ongoing series, we explore the push to have Simon Bridges positioned as a future leader of the National Party, and look at some of the criticisms coming through about Bridges, including the view that he’s captured by officials and close to the unions.

Let’s put aside for the moment the 200,000 acres of parkland that’s now got the Green Taliban’s puppet-masters Greenpeace calling for his sacking.   Read more »

Manufacturing Clark’s history

Helen Clark does so like to re-visit and re-edit her history, aided and abetted by an unquestioning and ill-informed media.

She has recently given a nice soft cosy interview to Channel Nine in Australia where this claim was made:

Having led the Labour Party without barely a whisper of a coup for six years in opposition and then nine years as Prime Minister, human resources at the UN could hardly argue that credential.

Oh rly?

Is that what she told the hapless Channel Nine reporter? I don’t see where he’d have got it from otherwise… he wouldn’t have the background knowledge of NZ politics.

And then Fairfax repeat it unquestioningly… probably because there isn’t anyone there who’s older than 12.

I’m sure readers don’t really need reminding, but if you do:

Fifteen years ago, Helen Clark stared down a party coup mounted by her eventual successor, Phil Goff. But her victory came at a huge price for Labour. Phil Quin, one of the plotters, offers an insider’s account.

About six weeks before Helen Clark finally cemented her grip on NZ Labour – one which she maintains to this day, even in absentia – I had finally convinced Phil Goff to topple her.

[...]  Read more »

Nanny State seeks to kill sugar thrills

Helen Clark got hurled out of Parliament for allowing her government to interfere too much in ordinary Kiwi lives. Things like trying to tell people what light-bulbs and shower-heads they were allowed to buy.

Kiwis just want to get on with their lives without being dictated to by nanny state zealots, desperate to push their agenda onto the populace.

So when the academic activists at Otago and Auckland Universities start calling for a 20% tax on cold tea and coffee, most people feel like telling them to take a long walk off a short pier.

But that’s exactly what the taxpayer funded troughers at FIZZ are calling for.

They’re now saying that cold tea and coffees are evil and part of the cause of obesity in New Zealand.

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Cunliffe had to do it, the Greens are toxic

David Cunliffe has been forced into distancing him and Labour somewhat from the Greens.

Audrey Young reports:

Labour yesterday rebuffed a proposal by the Green Party to present both parties as a coalition Government in waiting during in the run-up to the September 20 election.

Labour co-leader David Cunliffe indicated that such a pre-election arrangement could have posed problems with post-election negotiations with other parties, such as New Zealand First.

The Greens never had a formal coalition with the three-term Helen Clark Government, sufficing with a less extensive support agreement and no ministers.

Mr Cunliffe told the Herald tonight he envisaged that Labour would try to negotiate a formal coalition agreement with the Greens after the election, but until then he would be referring to a “Labour-led Government,” not a “Labour-Greens Government” – or a “Green-Labour Government” which had also been raised.

“I’m the leader of the Labour Party and my job is to maximize the Labour Party vote,” he said.

“The Labour Party will be the core of the incoming Government working co-operatively with the Green Party who are our longstanding friends.

But Labour would quite possibly be working with other parties as well “and whatever the coalition arrangements are, they need to be able to spread across more than two parties.”

He said it was important to maximize the reach “all the way from the greenest end of the green spectrum right to the political centre and cross-over voters and in order to do that, it is important that they have their brand and we have our brand, and they have their policies and we have our policies.”  Read more »

Hooton calls out Peters on foreign land ownership

Matthew Hooton calls out Winston Peters on foreign land ownership and his past record in this regard, especially his claims that restriction on foreign ownership of residential land has ALWAYS been a bottom line for NZ First.

Homeowners, farmers and property investors should heavily discount Winston Peters’ statement yesterday that stopping sales of residential properties and farms to foreigners will be and has always been a bottom line for NZ First.

He has no intention of implementing such a policy and nor has he ever done.

Anyone who owns or is thinking of owning property in New Zealand should take time to understand his record and his political imperatives as outlined below.

Twice in recent history, in 1996 and 2005, Mr Peters has held the balance of power and had the ability to choose the prime minister. In neither case did he make foreign ownership of residential properties or farms anything like a bottom line.

Check out his 1996 coalition deal with Jim Bolger: There are no new restrictions on sales of residential properties to non-residents.  The changes to the rules for farmland do not restrict ownership only to residents but allow purchases by others who “will make a material contribution to the local or New Zealand economy.  Read more »