Hone Harawira

Rob Hosking on Dotcom and his likely effect on Labour’s vote

Rob Hosking at the NBR opines about the effect of Kim Dotcom on NZ politics and correctly surmises that it is Labour who will be most affected.

Disaffected and disengaged youth, we are told, will be flowing to the polling booths to vote for Kim Dotcom’s Internet Party on September 20.

The “visionary” of the party will act as a beacon to 18 to 25 year olds who are utterly turned off by politics, the theory goes.

The people claiming this are mostly 40 to 50-year-old political obsessives, so I’m not sure I give this theory much credence.

Certainly Mr Dotcom – or Mr Schmitz, or Mr Kimble, or Mr Tim Jim Vestor, to give him the other names he has adopted over a long and somewhat ill-starred career – has excited some people, but the folk getting most breathless seem to be a small group of excitable journalists, along with a group of folk who are keen for something – anything – that will make a better job of opposing John Key’s National government than the current official opposition is doing.

It is not clear what Mr Dotcom is going to deliver, apart from a major disruptive factor.   Read more »

Cartoon of the Day

Credit:  SonovaMin

Credit: SonovaMin

Destroying Mana in pursuit of fast cash

It is unbelievable but it is happening.

The idiots of the Mana party are seriously contemplating a merger or arrangement with Kim Dotcom’s vanity project the Internet party. Clearly they too have been hoodwinked by his smoke and mirrors act.

This is tearing apart the Mana party very quickly even leading to dissent amongst family members, which given their past history is likely to end in a big family all in brawl.

Mana leader Hone Harawira’s wife, veteran activist Hilda Halkyard-Harawira, is among party members concerned about the likely alliance with the Internet Party.

Halkyard-Harawira raised her concerns in a closed session yesterday afternoon at the party’s conference in Rotorua, with Harawira confirming she remained wary of it.

An alliance looks almost certain after the movement voted to support the ongoing negotiations with Kim Dotcom’s Internet Party. While all seven Mana branches supported the move, there is still significant dissent within the party.

“She’s wary of the deal and understandably so. She sees it from not just a perspective of a Mana member or the wife of the Mana leader but from a long history of involvement in politics and activism,” Harawira said.

Harawira said his wife, who declined to comment, shared the concerns of others about the potential watering down of what the movement stood for.  Read more »

Mana and internet parties agree to date more before engagement

Well, it isn’t a marriage made in heaven.

Mana and the Internet Party had an arranged date yesterday, and there are no talks of marriage.  But to ensure it doesn’t sound like a complete failure, they’ve announced they’ll date some more.

Hone Harawira and Kim Dotcom have taken the next step in their slow dance, after Mana Party members agreed late last night to move forward in negotiations with the Internet Party.

The Mana Party has given its leaders a month to negotiate, before they put any proposed alliance out to the party’s local branches for consultation.

Yeah, Dotcom is on Maori time now.  I doubt he realised that the speed of decision making in Maoridom is glacial.  And a month is long time in politics.  You never know what might happen.

How did Dotcom appeal to his fellow bros and wahines?

The internet tycoon and his entourage arrived at the Mana annual meeting in large Porsche and Mercedes SUVs but he pulled out all the stops to convince Mana of his working-class credentials.

He had spent the journey down from his Coatesville mansion being briefed by a Ngati Whatua kaumatua on marae protocol and the Treaty of Waitangi.   Read more »

MANA will join forces with the Internet Party today

This weekend will be a tough on for Sue Bradford and John Minto.  Are they going to go with what they know is right, or will they take a huge dent to their credibility (such as it is) by yielding to the MANA party’s objective?

A tie-up with Kim Dotcom’s Internet Party is finding favour among the Mana Party’s younger grassroots members as a means of engaging young voters, Mana’s president Annette Sykes says.

The prospect of a tie-up with the Internet Party and the controversial German millionaire’s appearance has helped fire unprecedented levels of interest in the party’s annual meeting today in Rotorua, leader and sole MP Hone Harawira said yesterday.

Mr Dotcom’s speech to delegates this morning is his chance to convince the approximately 250 Mana members attending that an alliance is in their interests and won’t compromise their core values.

He is up against the perception that as a conspicuously wealthy man who initially cosied up to the political right in the form of John Banks, he is making a cynical grab for the chance of a seat or two in Parliament that a tie-up with Mana and Te Tai Tokerau MP Mr Harawira would offer.

“That’s one of the perspectives held strongly by some of our membership,” said Ms Sykes, who is also the party’s Waiariki candidate.

That would be the intellectually honest and almost sane part of the MANA party then.   The only reason Kim Dotcom wants your obedience and supplication is so that he has a snowball’s chance of being part of the King Maker Party after all the votes are tallied up.   Read more »

Maori party reacts to Hone and his “waharoa tiamana”

The Maori party president Naida Glavish has issued a stinging press release telling Hone Harawira just exctly why he is wrong in entertaining Kim Dotcom and his vanity political party.

“The Maori Party has every right to ‘butt in’ when Hone Harawira talks about playing a confidence trick on Te Tai Tokerau voters to use their Maori seat as a ‘waharoa tiamana’ (a German gateway) to get Kim Dotcom’s Internet Party into Parliament,” says the Maori Party’s president, Rangimarie Naida Glavish. She was responding to Hone Harawira’s call for the Maori Party to “butt out” of his Mana Party’s invitation to Kim Dotcom to speak to the Mana annual general meeting in Rotorua this weekend.

“At a time when the Maori Party has had to work hard for the billion dollars of Whanau Ora and other benefits for te iwi Maori, Dotcom has no kaupapa other than dodging extradition to the United States. The Maori Party will not butt out of its responsibility to point out that Dotcom offers nothing to our people,” said Ms Glavish.  Read more »

Hone tells Pita to naff off as he crawls closer towards a deal with Dotcom

A clever political game is being played at the moment.

Pita Sharples is manipulating Hone Harawira into doing the deal with Kim Dotcom by telling him he is an idiot for doing it and will therefore kill off Mana in the future.

Claire Trevett reports:

Mana Party leader Hone Harawira has told the Maori Party to butt out of its plans to talk to Kim Dotcom’s internet Party after Pita Sharples said there was nothing in it for the Mana Party other than money.

Maori Party MP Dr Sharples said today he was perplexed about Mr Harawira’s willingness to entertain joining up with Mr Dotcom’s internet Party.

Mr Dotcom is due to speak at Mana’s annual conference this weekend where the Mana Party will decide whether to enter an arrangement with his party in the election.

Dr Sharples said Mr Dotcom had done “absolutely nothing” for Maori.  Read more »

Kim and Hone sitting in a tree…

Oh, I know this is a cheap shot, but it is just too good not to share with you

IMG_8455

Cartoon of the Day

A challenge for David Cunliffe, put your money where your mouth is

Jamie Whyte has issued a challenge to David Cunliffe…for him to put his money where his mouth is.

The Labour Party has announced a return to “industrial policy”. If elected, they will decide which businesses and sectors of the economy will deliver the highest returns and promote them in various ways – most obviously, by subsidising them with taxpayers’ money.

This policy effectively replaces the decisions of private investors with the decisions of Labour Party politicians. It would be a foolish policy if Labour Party politicians were not better investors than the private investors they will replace.

So, before asking people to vote for the policy, shouldn’t David Cunliffe prove that he and his colleagues really are better investors than those who do it professionally?

He could do this easily. Mr Cunliffe could set up a small investment fund – $5,000 would suffice to get started – and trade it in the months before the election. Since he claims to know better than private investors which businesses will give the best returns, his fund should massively outperform the NZX 50 and other stock market indices.  Read more »