Hone Harawira

Cartoon of the Day

Credit:  SonovaMin

Credit: SonovaMin

Kelvin Davis is getting the word out

One of our readers took a bit of a Tiki Tour through Te Tai Tokerau and was pleased to discover a lot of Kelvin Davis signs:

trtyew

With all the distractions surrounding Dirty Politics, we all have kind of taken our eyes off Te Tai Tokerau, the “life or death” electorate for the Internet Mana “movement”.

If Hone Harawira doesn’t make it back as a sitting MP, their dreams all fall apart.

I still can’t figure out why he hasn’t declared the $500,000 he got from Kim Dotcom on the registry of pecuniary interests?  He has to within 10 days.

I might look into that some more.  Something’s not right.

Hooton on Labour’s Next Leader

Matthew Hooton has written an article in the NBR talking about who could be the next Labour leader.

He speaks of centrist candidates Stu Nash and Kel Davis as potential leaders if they can win their seats.

Depending on how their electorate races go, two names would emerge: Labour’s candidates in Te Tai Tokerau and Napier, Kelvin Davis and Stuart Nash.

Both live and breath Labour values but are reasonably centralist, in the John Key mode.  Both have played for the parliamentary rugby team, drink beer out of the bottle, are married to women and have kids.

If Mr Davis makes it back to parliament, he will have defeated the formidable Hone Harawira and kept Ms Harre, Ms Sykes and Mr Minto out.  By working hard at the local level over two elections, Mr Nash will have overturned National’s massive 9108 majority from 2008.  Both will have done it by getting National voters to tick red.

In Mr Davis’ case, he would become the first Maori leader of a major political party.  For Mr Nash, he would be seeking election as prime minister in 2017, exactly 60 years after the last Nash, his grandfather Walter, took Labour to power.  Moreover, in Labour’s centenary year, the grandson of Michael Joseph Savage’s finance minister would be leading the party towards power.  If they worked together, a Nash/Davis ticket would be a dream team.

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Checkers players versus Chess players in politics

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Phil Quin notes that there appear to be many in side Labour who are playing political chess when they are more suited to playing checkers.

Leaked revelations of a dispute between Labour’s Te Tai Tokerau candidate Kelvin Davis and the party’s Head Office over a proposed negative campaign against Hone Harawira and Kim Dotcom have been used as evidence of Davis going rogue.  In truth, the documents show a candidate engaged in nothing more sinister than garden variety electioneering; of trying to win a tough political fight. The tone of the news coverage appears to align with the political objectives of whoever furnished the leaks to begin with: to shut Davis up, and and his campaign operation down.

A more intriguing, as well as troubling, aspect of the leaked emails from Labour’s General Secretary Tim Barnett suggests someone is telling porkies about the party’s Maori seat strategy, not to mention understating its eagerness to figuratively wade in Kim Dotcom’s pool.

In sharp contrast to comments David Cunliffe made as recently as last Tuesday, Barnett prohibits the Labour campaign in Te Tai Tokerau from campaigning against the Internet Mana Party which he casts as a “progressive” ally.  Cunliffe, meanwhile, repeatedly told Radio Live’s Duncan Garner that Labour was “absolutely not” doing a deal with the Internet Mana Party, and that “we are backing Kelvin Davis to win in the North.”  And yet we now know, just a few weeks earlier, Secretary Barnett was telling the Davis campaign team to refrain from “picking fights” with Harawira and Dotcom.  There shouldn’t be any doubt about what Barnett is advocating here: since ‘picking fights’ with opponents is the very stuff of elections, Barnett is effectively instructing Davis to ‘run dead’ rather than actually campaign to win in Te Tai Tokerau.

At best, this suggests Mr Barnett does not stand by his leader’s oft-repeated mantra that Labour intends to contest all seven Maori seats, including Te Tai Tokerau.  At worst, it calls into question whether any such strategy ever existed.

We are witnessing yet more attempts at three dimensional chess by people far better suited to checkers.

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Cartoon of the Day

Credit:  SonovaMin

Credit: SonovaMin

Be thankful that he didn’t call you all gold diggers

So, Laila Harré is crying a river of tears because John Key said Kim Dotcom was her sugar daddy.

Personally I would have called her and John Minto, Hone Harawira and all the other hangers on all gold diggers.

Duncan Garner gives Laila Harré a serve.

Laila Harré – harden up.

And welcome back to politics. It hasn’t changed.

So, the Prime Minister said you’re backed by a sugar daddy – Kim Dotcom. So what? Many people will actually agree with him. It’s not really wrong. Is it?

To take offence is to be far too thin-skinned. Harden up, shake it off, but – best of all – just ignore it.

The truth is the Mana-Internet Party is backed by a German billionaire on the run from the authorities. It is what it is: he’s paying you and he’s paying for the party to exist. If he goes, the party goes.

Look the other way and grow a tougher hide. It’s only going to get worse.

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Superb placement of election signage

As reported by a Ground Crew Member just now… seen on Great North Rd, New Lynn

werewer

Cartoon of the Day

Credit:  SonovaMin

Credit: SonovaMin

Why Kelvin Davis is more honourable than Hone Harawira

Kelvin Davis is more honourable than Hone Harawira.

I’ll prove it but first we need to look at Andrea Vance’s article about the whole Hone vs Kelvin issue.

Is there a dirty deal underway in Te Tai Tokerau?  Short answer: no.

Emails leaked to TV3 at the weekend purportedly show Labour HQ had warned Te Tai Tokerau candidate Kelvin Davis off a smear campaign against Mana leader Hone Harawira.

Political watchers jumped to the conclusion that that meant Labour campaign managers wanted potential coalition partner Harawira to win the seat.

A victory would coat-tail in Laila Harre and some other Internet-Mana candidates, boosting left-bloc numbers.

This theory falls down because the emails do not explicitly say any such thing.

The emails don’t prove there is a deal Andrea, I’ll give you that….but it is an indicator that there is a deal in place, just the same as no signage in the electorate and no Labour people campaigning anywhere on behalf of Kelvin Davis says the same.

Labour people who have worked in the electorate for decades are telling me there is a deal, party apparatchiks are saying the same thing. There is a deal and until David Cunliffe categorically rules out any such deal with Hone Harawira, Man, Internet Mana or any of the iterations that could exists to prop up, support, or anything else then there is a deal in place and everything else is weasel words from one of the biggest weasels in parliament.

Instead, they are consistent with Labour’s campaign message: Vote Positive. Leader David Cunliffe made a ”sledge pledge” last month and has repeatedly stood by his assertion that the public dislike negative campaigning.

If there is anything to be drawn from these emails, it should be the timing of the leak, rather than their content.  This is right-wing mischief making.    Read more »

Hooton on Cunliffe’s delicate dance

Matthew Hooton looks into the problems besetting Labour with their dance of the veils with his potential coalition partners.

David Cunliffe can only become prime minister if Hone Harawira wins Te Tai Tokerau and brings Laila Harré, Annette Sykes and John Minto into parliament with him.

At the same time, any overt endorsement by Mr Cunliffe of Mr Harawira would do more harm to Labour’s still-strong election chances than what John Key feared would happen to National were he to endorse Colin Craig’s Conservative Party.

These brute facts explain the extraordinary manoeuvring that is underway in Mr Harawira’s electorate, which spans Cape Reinga to West Auckland.

Labour’s candidate is Kelvin Davis, who has a number of disabilities in the eyes of modern Labour: male and not ashamed of it; married to a woman; three kids all to the same woman; assistant principal at a Catholic school; plays rugby; drinks beer; lives in the provinces; believes in work not welfare.

Unsurprisingly, he was given a place on Labour’s list that makes it impossible for him to return to parliament unless Labour wins an unlikely 29% of the party vote.

Kelvin Davis is in the one position many in politics hope their opposition is never in…that of having nothing to lose. If he doesn’t win Te Tai Tokerau then his political career is over, therefore he will use any and all tactics open to him.

As first revealed exclusively in the NBR last week, Mr Davis and his supporters are determined to win Te Tai Tokerau from someone whose angry and grievance-based politics they regard as anathema to Maori economic development.

They wanted to launch an innovative web-based campaign targeting Mr Harawira’s relationship with Kim Dotcom in order to raise funds for the election, but were thwarted by Labour’s general secretary, the far-left Tim Barnett, who argues both Labour and Internet-Mana are part of the same progressive movement.

Perhaps out of desperation, some of Mr Davis’ supporters even approached me, asking if I would organise a corporate fundraising lunch for their candidate, after hearing of a similar event for another Labour candidate I was associated with.

That was also put a stop to.

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