humour

New Zealand media headline of the day

screenshot-whaleoil.co.nz

screenshot-whaleoil.co.nz

Screenshot-whaleoil.co.nz

Screenshot-whaleoil.co.nz

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Headline of the week

screenshot-Whaleoil.co.nz

screenshot-Whaleoil.co.nz

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Fundraising ideas for Labour, let’s help a comrade out

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Let’s face it, when it comes to fundraising the Labour party lack entrepreneurship  almost as badly as they lack funds. In an insincere gesture of cross-party cooperation I thought we could put our collective heads together to help our Labour Party comrades out.

I have a few product suggestions which I hope you will all add to in the comments.

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Bad translation fun

It is great how easy it is to get text translated these days. Unfortunately it doesn’t always translate perfectly but fortunately it can often be hilarious.

Below is the result of translating the above sentence in and out of English a few times using google translate.

During these days, how easy it is to get the text from a great present. Until the case is not a complete success can often hilarious

I don’t know how the below signs were translated but the end results are very enjoyable.

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Ever wondered if you are an Aspie?

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We  joke about Asperger’s syndrome in our family.  None of us have ever been diagnosed as being an Aspie but we certainly recognise a few Aspie qualities in the way that we interact and do things. Both Cameron and my son have  encyclopaedia-like memories. Cameron’s specialty is history and politics and his general knowledge is incredible.

I read recently that Aspie women are better at hiding their Aspie qualities from others. Apparently, they are better at pretending to be “normal” than the guys.

A wicked sense of humour is also, I believe, a common Aspie trait so here is a set of fun questions to find out if you too belong to the weird and wonderful world of the Aspie. I recognise myself and members of my family in quite a few.

NOTE: This is not a diagnostic tool – it is a bit of fun.

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Diversity at Whaleoil is vast, like the right-wing conspiracy

We here at Whaleoil pride ourselves on our diversity. The Ferald has asked if different organisations are too white. We here at Whaleoil ask if our organisation is too diversely fabulous?

The staff who run Whaleoil like a well-oiled… er Whale come from all walks of life. We were founded by a Fijian coconut.

Fijian coconut

Fijian coconut

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I’m a rightie so that makes me…

Inspired by an article on Stuff, I have decided to gauge what New Zealanders think about right-wing culture in a tongue-in-cheek move to try to change people’s perceptions.

Please finish the following sentence in the comments. The one with most upvotes wins.

Feel free to be negative, positive and also humorous. I do ask that you refrain from being crude or plain nasty.

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I am a rightie so that makes me…

Before you start here are some pictures to get your creative juices flowing.

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Suggestions for Labour’s 5100 places in emergency houses per year

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In the unlikely event that Labour are the government next election they have made a reckless promise to fund 5100 more emergency places in housing each year. One of the key problems they will have to face is the shortage of land in popular cities like Auckland. So, I have  made some suggestions for cost-effective and small homes to make the 5100 places both more doable  and more affordable.

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I am a leftie so that makes me…

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Inspired by an article on Stuff, I have decided to gauge what New Zealanders think about left-wing culture in a tongue-and-cheek move to try to change people’s perceptions.

Please finish the following sentence in the comments. The one with most upvotes wins.

Feel free to be negative, positive and also humorous. I do ask that you refrain from being crude or plain nasty.

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I am a leftie so that makes me…

Before you start here are some pictures to get your creative juices flowing.

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Photo of the Day

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Ann Lawanick struggles to support her exhausted partner, Jack Ritof, during a dance marathon in Chicago. IMAGE: LIBRARY OF CONGRESS/CORBIS/VCG VIA GETTY IMAGES

Bop Till You Drop

During The Great Depression, People Danced Until They Literally Dropped

Despite the use of the word ‘dance,’ the dance marathon was not a dance event so much as a social phenomenon. It demanded everything in the way of stamina and determination

Americans first experienced and embraced dance marathons in 1923, after which these events quickly gained popularity. But the dance marathon that burst upon the scene as yet another fad in keeping with the ebullient nature of the 1920s was dissimilar in form and intent from the dance marathon as it would evolve during the depression years of the 1930s. Within a decade, dance marathons were quickly transformed into a combination of contest and entertainment, replete with spectacle, humour, horror, romance suspense, and drama.

Between 1928 and 1934 when the Great Depression was devastating America, dance marathons became a major form of popular entertainment. Forced to consider all options for economic and emotional survival, many people chose the dance marathons. For the watchers, it was a diversion that held out the hope of seeing someone beat the odds and win, but most importantly, it was about them, a performative representation of people physically enduring gruellingly hard times. For contestants, winning meant earning money and maybe going on to bigger and better things. For the losers, they temporarily had hopes, food, shelter, and stability in an unstable world. Simply defined, a dance marathon was a competition to see which couple could dance or stay upright for the longest period of time without stopping.

Initially dance marathons were a product of the excessive mood of frivolity and celebration that characterized the 1920s and, as such, the concept behind them was both simple and naïve. Early marathoners wanted to break endurance records and gain fame. By the late 1920s and early 1930s, however, the Great Depression had altered the marathons. “Whereas in the 1920s marathons were part of the mood of liberated living in the name of patriotism, in the 1930s they represented arduous struggle for survival.

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