hunting

The Hunting Show Interview

I was called up over the weekend by Stephen Spargo and asked if I wanted to do an interview for The Hunting Show.

Here it is:

Check Out Hobbies Podcasts at Blog Talk Radio with The Hunting Show on BlogTalkRadio with The Hunting Show on BlogTalkRadio

I hadn’t heard of this show, but I’ve spent a bit of time listening in on the podcasts.

Visit their Facebook page and enjoy the offerings.

It is great to have a hunting focused radio show.

Every season they come for your guns

The Herald on Sunday has a rather poorly researched article about an apparent need to urgently review gun laws.

The call comes from a hippy academic who is the chairman of Peace and Conflict Studies at Otago University. Why is Otago University has developed a reputation for politically active wombles making trouble from their state funded trough?

In any case this hippy tool has exclaimed that we need tighter gun control….apparently.

A string of hunting accidents is proof New Zealand’s firearms laws need to be reviewed, a leading gun control advocate says.

In the past 10 years, 19 people have died and 57 have been injured by firearms.

A 44-year-old duck hunter suffered serious injuries after being shot in the elbow last Saturday. Another man, also 44, has been charged with careless use of a firearm causing injury and released on bail.

Kevin Clements, chairman of Peace and Conflict Studies at Otago University, said there were 1.1 million guns in the country and gun laws needed “urgent” review.

Currently, licensed gun-owners can provide firearms to people with no licence or training, so long as they are supervised. There is no limit to the number of firearms a licensed holder can own.

Read more »

Tahr Helicopter hazing case gaining wider coverage now

Last week we broke the story of a helicopter operator caught red handed on video hazing tahr. The video has been view more than 5,000 time as the story spreads.

Now the Timaru Herald has taken up the story.

A report of “indiscriminate” heli-hunting on public conservation land in South Canterbury has angered the deer hunting fraternity.

Footage of the alleged incident has appeared on the Whale Oil blog, and a group of South Canterbury deer hunters have also provided a sworn affidavit to the Department of Conservation.

According to the affidavit, the helicopter operator chased the tahr into a small gully, before dropping two people off to shoot the animals.

“After some flying up and down the gully it was obvious that the animals were being herded to where the shooter was,” the affidavit said. ¬† Read more »

[EXCLUSIVE] Illegal helicopter hazing of Tahr caught on camera

Himalayan Tahr Photo/ Stealth Films

Himalayan Tahr Photo/ Stealth Films

As regular readers will know I am a fan of hunting…the last trip I went on required me to stalk and observe Sambar. After I shot my deer I then had to go and locate and retrieve the animal…this was all done on foot, including recovering the animal up a steep blackberry covered gully.

Some people think that hunting should be done from helicopters. I disagree with them.

Now don’t get me wrong. I have no problem with the culling of pest herds and using helicopters and trained cullers to do that.

But actually flying over scared and frightened animals, or worse hazing them into exhaustion and then allowing people to shoot them is not hunting. It disgusts me.

I have been provided this video of a helicopter operator hazing and herding Tahr on Department of Conservation land. This requires the helicopter pilot to drop off his “hunters” and then to harass and scare animals into the range of what you will see are obviously inexperienced and useless shots.

Accompanying the video is a sworn affidavit of the three actual hunters who, sitting in blaze orange, were on a ridge when the helicopter cowboys flew in and proceeded to haze the Thar. They managed to capture stills, and video of the whole incident which has been released exclusively to WOBH.

According to the affidavit, signed by three NZDA hunters, they observed in the South Opuha block the following:

On that morning at 11:17am 9the time when the first photograph was taken) we were located at grid ref 170¬į 42.0976′E; 43¬į 54.441′S at about 1200m ASL to the south of Sugarloaf when we heard, then saw an approaching helicopter. It was travelling from the valley of the South opuha and along the tributary of that river which runs between our position and Sugarloaf heading in a north westerly direction, slightly higher than we were at about 1350-1400m. We could clearly see the marking of this black machine, HQL. Read more »

Photo Of The Day

A Punt Gun, was used for duck hunting but were banned because they depleted stocks of wild fowl

A Punt Gun, was used for duck hunting but were banned because they depleted stocks of wild fowl

Punt Gun

Read more »

Tagged:

Blogging might be a little slow…

…I need to get this yearling into the freezer. ¬†That’s after I climb out of this damn steep gully. ¬†Had to leave the big ones – no way would I have been able to get one back to the top of the ridge!

2014-04-20

Read more »

Tagged:

Sneak Peak: The Roar

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The Hunters Club (new show pilot episode)

Global roar against ‘canned’ hunting more of a tame meow

Ever since the outraged sparked on social media after Melissa Bachman (as I posted about several months ago about the blind irony of hunting outrage) ¬†posed with a dead Lion she had shot, the animal activists went feral with abusive messages, sexist and misogynist taunts ¬†and death threats. Despite a persons views on such subjects it should never descend to that level of behaviour, but such is the anonymity of the internet. Although many reading this may not have known it, yesterday was a ‘global protest’ against what they call ‘canned’ hunting. It would have been hard to find out, as very few media outlets covered because it is simply a non issue that really is no business to anyone except for people in the likes of South Africa.

But of course being a non issue, makes it a perfect story for a newspaper that is losing subscriptions  like a glue sniffer loses brain cells as the unattributed  Herald article repeats reports:

Wildlife campaigners joined rallies around South Africa in an international push to protect the lion and save the king of beasts from being raised in cages for “canned hunting”.

In Cape Town, South African archbishop and Nobel peace laureate Desmond Tutu gave his support to the rally with a prayer read by his daughter Mpho, calling for success in “saving all wildlife, but especially in this instance white lions.”

“Save the lion” rallies are set to be held in cities around the world, but the focus is on South Africa, where the hunting of lions raised in captivity is lucrative business.

Canned hunting involves releasing the lions into a confined area with no escape, and then allowing hunters to take home a lion head or skin as a memento from their kill.

“I don’t believe in canned hunting. It shouldn’t be hunting for trophies,” said Madeleine Goetsch, 54, who joined around 3,000 people at a march in Johannesburg.

“There is a place for regular hunting but certainly not for near extinct species,” she said.

Hold on a sec, near extinct species? Well, not quite. Lets have the real facts:

dg

 

That’s not quite “near extinct’. Not exactly pests either, but certainly not near extinct.

One of the rally organisers, Drew Abrahamson, 43, a conservationist who works in tourism, told AFP that the process of canned hunting starts when cubs are taken away from their mothers to be tamed and allow tourists to pet them.

“Then when they become too dangerous, they enable them to grow, especially the males, and they release the mature males for the hunters,” she explained.

“They can shoot at close range as the lions are tamed.”

Hunting for wild animals is a big tourism draw in South Africa bringing in 1.24 billion rand (83 million euros, $115 million) in 2012, according to a study.

A foreign hunter pays more than $3,000 a day for the hunting, which requires a special permit, it said, with part of the fee slated for preservation.

The foreign hunters are mainly rich Americans (55 per cent) and Europeans (40 per cent), especially Germans, French, Poles, Finns, Austrians and Hungarians.

And the business of raising lions in captivity is increasing, according to a memorandum the campaigners presented to the South African government, the European Union and CITES, the international convention for the protection of wildlife.

Around 60 per cent of the lions in South Africa – some 5,000 animals – live in cages to be sold to zoos or released for a few days into the designated area to become the target of hunters.

The caged lions are nearly three times more numerous than lions in the wild, according to the campaigners who are calling for the practice to be ended.

South Africa’s association of professional hunters criticised the campaign saying it was confusing illegal hunts with forms that are legal and responsible and “have a positive impact” on wildlife preservation, it said.

Appears to be a sound business opportunity if you can get into it, not only does it help save the animals in the wild by easing hunting pressure, it is a profitable tourism venture. Ironically millions of dollars made from game farm hunting goes into¬†conservation and sustainability management. ¬†Money which otherwise does not come from anywhere else. Least of all from the shrieking protesters bleating like hungry goats that are apparently trying to save the Lions by trying to ban the practice that funds the population sustainability, many can’t seem to get their heads around the ironic fact that it the game park hunting keeping the wild populations head above water.

Meanwhile, thousands took to the streets in Auckland yesterday in protest:

canned

 

I count nine. Meanwhile, lame ducks in Auckland continue to be protected by legislation, despite causing widespread damage to the local economy and population.

Tuesday nightCap