Immigration New Zealand

Press Editorial on the farce that is Kim Dotcom

Memo to the Herald and TV3 there is a reason your audience alongside your credibility is shrinking…your audience are not as stupid as you think they are.

David “tainted” Fisher’s story proved there was no conspiracy despite him stretching credibility to breaking point. It also, if anything, undermines Dotcom’s claims that Key had heard of him prior to the raids, not that anyone really cares when he heard of him.

As the editorial points out if Key did a deal with Hollywood it would be much easier to extradite him if he hadn’t been granted residency.

Good to see the useless Grant Robertson on the news defying his leaders edict for a positive campaign and calling for John Key to come clean on what he knows. SInce he wants John Key to come clean, how about his boss tells us who his secret donors. It looks Labour want to continue to play gotcha politics, and the recent polls show Labour precisely how that is working out.

The Press editorial outlines the farce that is Kim Dotcom.

As if the saga of Kim Dotcom were not already absurd enough, this week it descended into a swirl of conspiracy theories that made it look like downright farce.

The theories are not necessarily compatible with each other or even internally consistent. Their main purpose is likely to turn out to be simply that they keep Dotcom’s name in the public eye.

Following them and attempting to disentangle them certainly adds to the stock of harmless public entertainment.

The theories have been fed by the release of email exchanges from Immigration New Zealand and the Security Intelligence Service about Dotcom’s application for permanent residency in New Zealand.

The application had been sent by INZ to the SIS for routine security and criminal checks. Dotcom was apparently anxious that permanent residency be granted so when he had not heard from INZ his agent had asked about it, prompting INZ to urge the SIS to hurry up with its report.

Many have leapt on an SIS officer’s off-hand suggestion in an email that “political pressure” was behind INZ’s interest in getting the SIS report.    Read more »

Fat bastard reduced to begging

The saffa fat bastard facing deportation for being a fat bastard is now on the bludge instead of trimming off a few more kilos.

A South African man facing deportation because he is “too fat” for New Zealand is appealing to the public for financial help.

Albert Buitenhuis and his wife Marthie are waiting for a decision from Associate Minister of Immigration Nikki Kaye over whether they can stay in the country.

The pair moved to New Zealand in 2007 and have worked in a Christchurch restaurant ever since.  Read more »

Helen the Hobbit Hater at it again with the Horrid

Aided and abetted by the Herald on Sunday there is a something nothing article featuring chief Hobbit Hater Helen Kelly, moaning yet again about Weta and employment issues.

Foreign workers are being targeted for more than 500 visual-effects jobs for the production of the next mega-movie in The Hobbit series.

Wellington-based special-effects giant Weta Digital, co-owned by Sir Peter Jackson, has asked Immigration New Zealand for approval in principle to outsource 526 positions.

Weta says most are just extensions to visas that are about to expire and the company has a great record of hiring Kiwis, but Council of Trade Unions president Helen Kelly is questioning the company’s commitment to the local industry.

Apart from ads on the company website, she could not find evidence Weta had let Kiwis know opportunities were available, and questioned why another application was being made when Weta asked for 369 temporary work visas last year.

“They’ve done very little to bridge that gap. They don’t want to invest in (our) people.”  Read more »

A good summary of facts

ᔄ Keeping Stock

Inventory have a good summary of facts on the Bill Liu affair…this is one bone he has been chewing on and has the best coverage of the whole case:

Nine months before Liu was granted New Zealand citizenship, David Cunliffe received advice from Immigration New Zealand officials. That advise was that Liu was suspected of having multiple identities and multiple passports. On that basis, Cunliffe, then the Immigration Minister was asked to consider revoking Liu’s permanent residence. Cunliffe chose not to take this course of action.
So here are some links to ponder:

NZ Herald 7/4/2010: The citizenship was granted nine months after officials advised the Immigration Minister at the time, David Cunliffe, that dual identities allegedly used by Yan were grounds to revoke his permanent residency. 

Stuff 19/5/2012: Three months later, bank accounts he held in Australia were frozen and in June 2007, $4m was sent to the Chinese Government. Yan was not convicted of any offence – he agreed to the repatriation without an admission of liability – but allegations swirling around him were so serious immigration officials suggested his permanent residency be revoked.

NZ Herald 31/1/2009: By 2007 Immigration officials recommended Liu’s permanent residency be revoked on grounds that he had allegedly provided false information.

NZ Herald 4/7/2009: The citizenship was granted nine months after officials advised the Immigration Minister at the time, David Cunliffe, that dual identities allegedly used by Liu were grounds to revoke his permanent residency. 

And lastly, InvestigateDaily 3/12/2011:
Jones, as Associate Immigration Minister, was presumed to have seen immigration files on Yang Liu, in addition to his role as delegated Internal Affairs Minister. It was in that latter role that Jones gave Liu New Zealand citizenship, against the explicit warnings of officials who told him Liu’s identity was believed fake and that his citizenship application was fraudulent.

Internal Affairs sources have told TGIF that a recommendation also went to the Minister of Immigration recommending Liu’s permanent residency be revoked while it was still possible to do so, but the Minister overturned it.

TGIF spoke to then Immigration Minister Clayton Cosgrove who denied any involvement with the Liu case and said such cases would normally have been handled by the Associate Minister. Cosgrove subsequently told us this week he’d received a verbal briefing from officials confirming they believed Liu’s residency had been obtained fraudulently, and that he was under investigation. But Cosgrove reiterated he had never seen Liu’s file or received any written briefing.

Yet our OIA request to the Immigration Service for the file to Shane Jones recommending residency be revoked turned up a surprise answer:
“Papers of that nature were sent to a previous Minister of Immigration and are withheld,” confirmed Api Fiso, the Group Manager for Border Security at the Immigration Service.

With Cosgrove out of the picture, that left his predecessor David Cunliffe in the gun. It now appears Cunliffe was, like Jones, explicitly warned about Yang Liu’s fraudulent residency application, yet for inexplicable reasons chose not to revoke the Labour party donor’s visa when he had the chance.

There are plenty more links that we could list, but we reckon that we’ve risen to Judge Holden’s challenge, and then some.