Immigration

For years I was accused of being racist

The man that signaled that unchecked immigration would turn into a severe problem for the UK is finally recognised as being smart, instead of racist.   Andrew Green writes:

It is remarkable that I, a campaigner against mass immigration, should this week have been granted a life peerage. A decade ago that would have been unthinkable, but the fact that it is now happening is a measure of how much attitudes have changed.

It has certainly taken a while. When I co-founded MigrationWatch with Professor David Coleman in 2001, nobody wanted to touch the subject. There was a widespread fear of being accused of racism that the Left were only too willing to exploit, and still are.

in those early years I was immensely encouraged when ordinary people, who must have seen me on television, stopped me in the street to thank me for what I was doing. These were the real people. Elsewhere, however, the so-called sensitivity was such that the BBC would not even use the word immigration. They called it ‘in-migration’. And for years any BBC interview on the subject began with the question: ‘Is it racist to discuss immigration?’ with the clear implication that the questioner thought that it was.

This went on long after the Prime Minister at the time, the Home Secretary, and even Trevor Phillips, head of the Commission on Racial Equality, declared that it was not. This was not enough to stop some newspapers accusing us of racism.

When an article in the Left-leaning Daily Mirror implied I was in some way associated with the Ku Klux Klan, I’d had enough. I instructed my lawyers, and the paper settled out of court for several thousand pounds of damages. Following two similar episodes with the Independent, the Left-wing press became rather more careful. Read more »

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Guess where the Islamic paradise on earth actually is

The UK

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French police used tear gas on crowds of migrants this week in Calais when around 300 attempted to storm lorries heading for the Channel 

Illegal immigrants making desperate bids to reach Britain have turned the port of Calais into a lawless ‘jungle’, according to the French far-right leader.

Marine Le Pen seized on escalating tensions in the town by calling for the urgent reintroduction of internal border controls that have been banished across much of Europe.

The leader of the anti-immigrant National Front party made the remarks during a visit to the northern port town where riot police this week used teargas to ward off hundreds of immigrants seeking to jump on to lorries bound for Britain.

There are similarities between the UK and New Zealand.  Both island nations.  Both tolerant secular western societies.    Read more »

Key isn’t making it up – the world is puckering up due to the ISIS threat

Thousands of terror suspects in the UK are being monitored by the security services, it has been claimed.

Far more militants than previously thought are under surveillance, according to the Mayor of London.

Boris Johnson said the threat from Islamist extremists may be greater than officials have admitted.

It had been believed that the main danger came from some 500 jihadis who have travelled to Syria and Iraq from Britain to join Islamic State or Al-Qaeda. About half of these have since returned to the UK.

But Mr Johnson told the Daily Telegraph the danger was much more widespread than the relatively small numbers of extremists who have gone abroad to fight.

‘In London we’re very, very vigilant and very, very concerned,’ he said. ‘Every day – as you saw recently, we had to raise the threat level – every day the security services are involved in thousands of operations.

Luckily New Zealand doesn’t quite have the same proportion of Muslim immigration to underpin such a threat, but just because the numbers are lower doesn’t mean we don’t have our own issues.   Read more »

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Press Editorial on the farce that is Kim Dotcom

Memo to the Herald and TV3 there is a reason your audience alongside your credibility is shrinking…your audience are not as stupid as you think they are.

David “tainted” Fisher’s story proved there was no conspiracy despite him stretching credibility to breaking point. It also, if anything, undermines Dotcom’s claims that Key had heard of him prior to the raids, not that anyone really cares when he heard of him.

As the editorial points out if Key did a deal with Hollywood it would be much easier to extradite him if he hadn’t been granted residency.

Good to see the useless Grant Robertson on the news defying his leaders edict for a positive campaign and calling for John Key to come clean on what he knows. SInce he wants John Key to come clean, how about his boss tells us who his secret donors. It looks Labour want to continue to play gotcha politics, and the recent polls show Labour precisely how that is working out.

The Press editorial outlines the farce that is Kim Dotcom.

As if the saga of Kim Dotcom were not already absurd enough, this week it descended into a swirl of conspiracy theories that made it look like downright farce.

The theories are not necessarily compatible with each other or even internally consistent. Their main purpose is likely to turn out to be simply that they keep Dotcom’s name in the public eye.

Following them and attempting to disentangle them certainly adds to the stock of harmless public entertainment.

The theories have been fed by the release of email exchanges from Immigration New Zealand and the Security Intelligence Service about Dotcom’s application for permanent residency in New Zealand.

The application had been sent by INZ to the SIS for routine security and criminal checks. Dotcom was apparently anxious that permanent residency be granted so when he had not heard from INZ his agent had asked about it, prompting INZ to urge the SIS to hurry up with its report.

Many have leapt on an SIS officer’s off-hand suggestion in an email that “political pressure” was behind INZ’s interest in getting the SIS report.    Read more »

Oh look, there was no “political pressure” now, Herald over eggs story

It looks like the NZ Herald and David Fisher have over egged their story about Kim Dotcom, with immigration officials denying any political involvement.

That isn’t stopping Grant Robertson making hay while his leader is hiding from press in Queenstown.

NewstalkZB reports:

The government’s denying it put “political pressure” on Immigration officials to grant Kim Dotcom’s residency.

It follows the release of SIS emails, showing agents wanted to hold off on the residency application because Dotcom faced investigation by the FBI.

But they quickly gave it the green light, after being told Immigration New Zealand faced “political pressure” to get it approved.

A senior Immigration official said the then-minister, Jonathan Coleman, was an “interested party” in the application, because the government wanted more “high rollers”, like the internet mogul, gaining residency

Dr Coleman’s not commenting on the revelations, except to say the decision to grant residency was made by the department, and not by him.

Immigration New Zealand now says there was “unequivocally” no political pressure on the case.

John Key’s repeatedly denied knowing anything about Dotcom until just before his arrest in 2012.

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Labour continue to dump on their Pasifika voters

From a Labour press release:

Under a Labour government, Kiwi business must exhaust the options for hiring local workers before bringing in overseas migrants.

The party also wants to target the exploitation of migrant workers. Businesses will have to pay at least the living wage, after accommodation deductions. Recognised Seasonal Employer (RSE) will be paid at least the minimum wage plus $1.25 an hour, with accommodation provided in addition to wages.

“We are also concerned that a significant number of workers are being brought into New Zealand for relatively low-skilled jobs on low rates of pay. This not only leads to exploitation of these workers but undercuts the local labour market, pushing wages down for Kiwis,” he said.

“To address that Labour will require employers bringing in overseas workers to pay a living wage (after accommodation deductions) where the job offer forms part of the reason the application is accepted. This does not apply for the Pacific quota migrants.”

wait-what

Hosking on the turn around in immigration

Mike Hosking’s editorial yesterday was about the turn around in immigration, another crisis that was solved by Labour declaring it was a crisis.

Can I make a small plea to not make the same mistake as last time?

We appear this week to be in receipt of some more good news. The good news involves our migration rate, which is at its highest in more than a decade. 36,400 migrants arrived in the year to March.

Further, I have more good news which I suspect shows the two are connected. The bloke who came up with the term “the rock star economy” has added to his commentary by suggesting he feels good about that prediction. His company that made the call about our progress thinks they were right and by and large we’re “rocking on”.

So one can safely assume that people all over the world have seen this sort of commentary. The word has got out and so the queue has started to form to get into the country.

Now last time (and sadly it wasn’t that long ago) that the numbers started to look pretty flash, instead of celebrating the moaners and lefties all started freaking out and turned the good news into a worry fest by suggesting all these people were nothing but trouble because all they’d want to do when they got here was get a job, earn money and buy a house.

It leads me to ask the question – do you reckon were about the only country on the planet that could take such good news and somehow try and turn it into a negative? And in trying to turn it into a negative, had no one noticed that we might just be a bit under populated and there were no shortage of countries all over the world of exactly the same size as us who had a heap more people and were doing just fine thank you?

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Reporting on Ass nasty Lolly Stealer

I truly don’t understand how others in NZ First put up with her.  But before I comment, check this out.

via Twitter

via Twitter

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Fine tuning immigration to drop Auckland House prices? Reserve Bank says yeah… Nah

David Cunliffe in front of "own Our Future"

David Cunliffe in front of “own Our Future”

Felix Marwick at Newstalk ZB hammers down another nail into the David Cunliffe Immigration Coffin

Labour’s plans to control immigration look to have been dealt a blow by the Governor of the Reserve Bank.

Labour has promised to control immigration and introduce what it’s calling moderate and sensible measures to help address pressures on housing prices.

But Reserve Bank Governor Graeme Wheeler says it’s very hard to fine tune immigration to meet demand purposes. Read more »

Uh oh, the Greens aren’t buying Cunliffe’s dog whistle either

David Cunliffe tried to out dog-whistle Winston Peters in a dog whistling competition on immigration and it has fallen flat.

Ever since they launched their policy it has been systematically rolled back and proven to be a hoax.

David Cunliffe continues to lie about what he said or what Trevor Mallard has said and at the same time the Greens have announced that they aren’t buying the dog-whistle either.

One of the many brilliant people I know is Pengjun Zhao. He is from China and we worked together at Otago University on urban sustainability. He came to NZ and was welcomed because we need his skills as a transport modeller to help us consider the consequences of different policy decisions on people’s mobility and carbon footprints. He has also helped us create links with policy and academic communities in China.

Over the last couple of weeks Labour has suggested immigrants are causing our housing crisis and that we should cut the numbers of immigrants coming in, NZ First has suggested too many unskilled migrants are coming and taking our jobs and National wants us stop those boat people. All this adds up to unhelpful and potentially stigmatising conversation.  Read more »