Independent Commission against Corruption

Time for an Independent Commission of Corruption

In Australia the unions and the Labor party stand charged with many, many counts of political corruption. In Australia they have an institution with teeth, the powers to compel evidence, the powers to prosecute…it is called the Independent Commission Against Corruption.

Fiji also has an Independent Commission Against Corruption.

Why not here?

With the latest revelations of political corruption involving the Labour party, from David Cunliffe on down, Shane Taurima who is a prospective Labour party candidate and TVNZ, we are seeing and extension of the willingness of the left-wing to abandon any semblance of ethics in journalism and corrupt their organisation like Alistair Thompson has done to Scoop Media.

For years the left-wing has accused the right of collusion and corruption with the media, and now we are seeing month after month of left-wing politicians prostituting and prostrating themselves before the altar of corruption.

The Herald reports on the latest fiasco:

TVNZ unit manager Shane Taurima has resigned from the state broadcaster after revelations he took part in a Labour Party hui and that TVNZ facilities were used to host Labour Party meetings.

3 News reported tonight that TVNZ offices were used to host a meeting of Labour’s Tamaki Makaurau branch last year. TVNZ staff emails were also used to organise a subsequent hui in January this year which Labour leader David Cunliffe attended. Mr Taurima, the head of TVNZ’s Maori and Pacific unit, had acted as a facilitator and spoken about the Maori vote at that January hui.¬† Read more »

Winston redux…same as he ever was

Here’s a redux after the Owen Glenn scandal.

Winston says he never asks for money – he gets others to do that… “he’s there for the politics of the thing”.¬† Read more »

Waikato Times Editorial on Corruption

While convicted blackmailer, fraudster and serial litigant Graham McCready continues to cut a swathe through our judicial processes it should be noted that more and more politicians are breaking the law, especially electoral law.

While I cannot condone McCready’s use of the court for his own style of bullying there are many other who do the same thing, pretending to be litigants in person but costing their victims thousands.

With the failure of the Police though to action complaints against politicians it is time for something more robust that private prosecutions. In Australia we are witnessing what happens when regulators like the Independent Commission Against Corruption actually do what out Police have singularly failed to do you have to wonder why we don’t have such a body too.

The Waikato Times thinks the same.

Some legal experts have explained their doubts that Mr McCready will succeed in getting a private prosecution against Mr Brown. They say he will need witnesses to allege a link between the free hotel rooms at Sky and his support for SkyCity’s conference centre bid. Without that, there is no proof.¬† Read more »

The trouble with deals like SkyCity

The Attorney General, Chris Finlayson is in a spot of bother¬†‚Ästbut Labour are too busy¬†re-announcing¬†what they‚Äôre¬†not¬†going to¬†do to pick up on it.

In order for the former bankrupt’s private prosecution against morally bankrupt, Len Brown, there is the small hurdle of the Attorney General.  Stuff reports:

Retired accountant Graham McCready has filed affidavits supporting a private prosecution against Auckland mayor Len Brown. …

McCready said that Brown’s acceptance of the gifts led to “favourable consideration” towards SkyCity and he would prosecute the mayor under section¬†105(1) of the Crimes Act¬†- corruption and bribery of an official.He was expected to appeal to the Attorney General to allow the case against Brown to proceed.Earlier this week, McCready backed down on an announcement he would file papers against Brown’s wife, Shan Inglis. ¬†¬† Read more »

Corrupt, dodgy ALP ratbag set to have his millions reefed back

Eddie Obeid the ALPs virtual mafia don is set to have a good chunk of his ill-gotten millions reefed back by the NSW government.

The state government is set to pass extraordinary laws to strip corrupt former Labor minister Eddie Obeid and his family of at least $30 million in profits from a coal deal at the centre of a historic corruption probe.

A day after Premier Barry O’Farrell announced the government would pass special laws to tear up three corruption-tainted coal exploration licences, Mr O’Farrell said it was also working on laws to confiscate the proceeds of corrupt activity by former Labor figures and businessmen.

He said on Tuesday the laws to cancel the licences would be introduced in state Parliament next week, while additional laws to claw back proceeds of corrupt coal ventures from Mr Obeid and others were still
in development.

“I’m told that it will take a little bit longer,” Mr O’Farrell said.

Cunliffe referred to Police

After gobbing off in parliament today along with Russel Norman about pending court action for John Banks David Cunliffe has ended up with egg on his face.

Read more »

No corruption in NZ? Of course there is

People think New Zealand has no corruption. Of course there is, and here is why…little or no penalties.

A private eye who has helped two clients lay bribery charges under the Secret Commissions Act in the past month says the penalties need updating as they haven’t changed in more than a 100 years.

Danny Toreson of Thompson and Toreson Investigations would not name the clients, but said: “One is a commercial organisation and the other is a government body”.

The Secret Commissions Act is the main law outlawing staff taking backhanders for awarding work and contracts without their employer’s knowledge. For example, a government worker could give a contract to a company in return for a secret payment or benefit.¬† Read more »

A premier with balls

Barry O’Farrell is the NSW Premier and he has announced that if there is any mischief involving his ministers then off to the Independent Commission Against Corruption you go.

Ministers who breach the code of conduct will be answerable to the Independent Commission Against Corruption for the first time after Premier Barry O’Farrell announced support for the regulator’s recommendations.

Following inquiries involving former Labor ministers Eddie Obeid and Ian Macdonald over the allocation of lucrative coal licences, the ICAC advised the government to adopt several anti-corruption measures.

One was that the NSW government’s ministerial code of conduct becomes ”an applicable code” for the purposes of the ICAC Act, meaning serious breaches could amount to corrupt conduct.

Additionally, ICAC recommended that the government overhaul the way mining licences were issued in NSW.

Aussie Wog ratbag now playing race card

Eddie Obeid is now crying racism against the Independent Commission Against Corruption.

Disgraced former Labor minister Eddie Obeid has accused the corruption watchdog of racism for implying his family are “wog Lebanese”, who took the spoils of joint business ventures “from the one bloody plate”.

In a heated morning in the Independent Commission Against Corruption on Monday, Mr Obeid said he was not involved in the business dealings of his nine children and 31 grandchildren.

“I’m not involved in their daily lives,” he said.

The ICAC is investigating whether Mr Obeid , 70, used his political influence to lobby colleagues about cafes at Circular Quay, water licences in rural NSW and consulting business Direct Health Solutions.¬† Read more »

Aussies take lying ratbag politicians a whole lot more seriously than we do

While Len Brown appears to be getting off with so much as a slap on the hand with a wet bus ticket for lying in LGOIMA requests, in Australia they have organisations that can truly hold lying ratbags to account.

Like the Independent Commission Against Corruption…who are currently holding Joe Tripodi’s feet to the fire.

Former Labor minister Joe Tripodi¬†¬†has been accused of lying to a corruption inquiry after giving extraordinary evidence that Eddie Obeid’s ”interest” in businesses at Circular Quay was not financial.

Mr Tripodi, who was recalled to the Independent Commission Against Corruption at his own request, changed his evidence on Wednesday to admit he did tell a staff member in 2006 that his corrupt former colleague had ”an interest” in three cafes at Circular Quay.

But the former ports minister claimed he meant ”interested or concerned” rather than financially involved in the lucrative businesses.