Injection

Photo Of The Day

(FILES) - Picture taken on January 20, 2004 in Toulouse (southwestern France) shows Frenchman Andre Bamberski holding a picture of her daughter Kalinka Bamberski who was allegedly raped and murdered by her German stepfather doctor Dieter Krombach in 1982. Krombach was found on October 18, 2009, wounded and tied up in front of Mulhouse courthouse (eastern France). He has been put under police custody as well as Bamberski who was oddly present in the area. AFP PHOTO / REMY GABALDA (Photo credit should read REMY GABALDA/AFP/Getty Images)

Picture taken on January 20, 2004 in Toulouse (southwestern France) shows Frenchman Andre Bamberski holding a picture of her daughter Kalinka Bamberski who was allegedly raped and murdered by her German stepfather doctor Dieter Krombach in 1982. Krombach was found on October 18, 2009, wounded and tied up in front of Mulhouse courthouse (eastern France). He has been put under police custody as well as Bamberski who was oddly present in the area. AFP PHOTO / REMY GABALDA (Photo credit should read REMY GABALDA/AFP/Getty Images)

Kalinka

When 14-year-old Kalinka was found dead in 1982, her father Andre Bamberski, a quietly-spoken man, took the law into his own hands. For three long decades Andre Bamberski waged a tireless campaign to win justice for the daughter he was sure had been murdered. Pretty, sports-mad Kalinka, 14, was found dead in suspicious circumstances.

The abduction of Dr. Dieter Krombach began in the village of Scheidegg, in southern Germany. His three kidnappers punched him in the face, tied him up, gagged him, and threw him in the back of their car. They drove 150 miles, crossing the border into the Alsace region of France, with Krombach stretched out on the floor between the seats. The car stopped in the town of Mulhouse.

An accomplice called the local police and stayed on the line just long enough to deliver a bizarre instruction: “Go to the rue de Tilleul, across from the customs office,” the anonymous caller said. “You’ll find a man tied up.” A few minutes later, two police cars arrived at the scene, their red and blue patrol lights illuminating the street. Behind an iron gate, in a dingy courtyard between two four-story buildings, Krombach lay on the ground. His hands and feet were bound and his mouth was gagged. He was roughed up but very much alive. When the police removed the covering from his mouth, the first thing he said was “Bamberski is behind it.”

The French septuagenarian André Bamberski to whom Krombach referred was, on the face of it, an unlikely kidnapper. Until 1982, he had been a mild-mannered accountant and the adoring father of a lively young girl, Kalinka. That year, Kalinka attended a French-language high school in the small German city of Freiburg, as a boarder, and spent most weekends and summers in nearby Lindau, with Bamberski’s ex-wife and her new husband, Dieter Krombach.

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Needle-less Injections

Mashable

Awesome news from MIT…they have developed an injection system that is needle-less. The coolest thing is the device actually uses a form of liquefaction to deliver powdered medicines as well:

MIT scientists are developing a needle-less injection that could make getting a flu shot as painless as a mosquito bite.

The device shoots a tiny, high-pressure jet of medicine through the skin as fast as the speed of sound.

According to the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention, hospital healthcare workers incur about 385,000 needle-related injuries every year. Meanwhile, fear or discomfort from needles prevents many patients from complying with doctors’ orders.

MIT isn’t the first institution to experiment with needle-less injections that may help solve these longstanding problems. The concept has been around since the 1860s. The U.S. military developed high-speed models in the 1950s for use in mass-vacination programs. And modern pharmacists have long offered needle-free flu shots.

The prototype injection system that MIT has created, however, allows for more precision in needle-less injections than has previously been possible. According to MIT News, it allows healthcare workers to adjust a range of doses at various depths.

If giving a shot to a baby, for instance, the shot administrator can use less pressure than he or she would to breech the skin of an adult. Flexibility in dosage and depth also makes jet-powered shots viable for a wider range of treatments.