internet

Something not right with this story

Apparently, according to OneNews you can’t be charged with death threats issued over the internet.

A student who received death threats and was labelled a terrorist simply for wearing a turban was shocked when police said they couldn’t protect him.

Rajwinder Singh feared for his life after his photograph was posted online, without his knowledge, alongside false criminal accusations.

A vicious backlash followed as the photo was shared around, including threats of violence and publicly listing his workplace.

“Put a bat through his turban and smash his legs to a pulp,” one person said on social media.

Genuinely afraid, the 23-year-old went to the police only to be told nothing could be done because the comments were online and therefore “not public”.

ONE News contacted Canterbury police for comment but despite Mr Singh giving permission for his file to be made public, they refused an interview.

The police could not help Mr Singh because making death threats online is not a crime.

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An email from a reader

A reader emails:

Questions in the House

JACINDA ARDERN to the Minister of Internal Affairs: How will his decision to cut funding by $392,000 a year to the specialist non-fiction service provided by the National Library affect access to educational resources for rural schools?

When I read this gem I was reminded of the time I had moved to Wellington (about 1987) and was looking for a Branch of the Labour Party to join.  Such was the activism of the Party at the time there was plenty of choice.  I visited several inner city branches, the most memorable of which was the Aro St Branch.  They were preparing remits for Conference, and the question of Nicaragua came up.  The members got all fired up and rummaged around to find the remit they had put in the previous year, and the year before that … and decided to represent it.  The war in Nicaragua was over, there was no reason to go and help the Sandanistas by picking coffee, and there were many more important things at home to worry about.   Read more »

Face of the day

about_200_people_packed_into_the_hutton_theatre_at_54099ffb11

Nicky Hager

Today’s face of the day is the author / journalist who used material stolen from a blogger/ journalist to write a book then was outraged when his ‘ journalistic ‘ privacy was ignored when the Police used a legally obtained warrant to search his home. They were looking for evidence of the identity of the Hacker that he did business with in order to illegally obtain a blogger/journalist’s private correspondence with confidential sources as well as his personal correspondence in order to sell a book and make money.

This is a guy with more cheek than a fat man’s bottom.

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Andrew Sullivan’s last blog post on media and blogging

Andrew Sullivan has quit blogging. He suddenly announced his retirement about 10 days ago and has quickly wound down to yesterday’s last day of blogging.

His last blog post is about one of his first and echoes my thoughts on the medium perfectly.

Thirteen years ago, as I was starting to experiment with this blogging thing, I wrote the following:

[T]he speed with which an idea in your head reaches thousands of other people’s eyes has another deflating effect, this time in reverse: It ensures that you will occasionally blurt out things that are offensive, dumb, brilliant, or in tune with the way people actually think and speak in private. That means bloggers put themselves out there in far more ballsy fashion than many officially sanctioned pundits do, and they make fools of themselves more often, too. The only way to correct your mistakes or foolishness is in public, on the blog, in front of your readers. You are far more naked than when clothed in the protective garments of a media entity.

But, somehow, you’re liberated as well as nude: blogging as a media form of streaking. I notice this when I write my blog, as opposed to when I write for the old media. I take less time, worry less about polish, and care less about the consequences on my blog. That makes for more honest writing. It may not be “serious” in the way, say, a 12-page review of 14th-century Bulgarian poetry in the New Republic is serious. But it’s serious inasmuch as it conveys real ideas and feelings in as unvarnished and honest a form as possible. I think journalism could do with more of that kind of seriousness. It’s democratic in the best sense of the word. It helps expose the wizard behind the media curtain.

I stand by all those words. There are times when people take this or that post or sentence out of a blog and make it seem as if it is the definitive, fully considered position of the blogger. Or they take two sentences from different moments in time and insist that they are a contradiction. That, it seems to me, misses the essential part of blogging as a genuinely new mode of writing: its provisionality, its conversational essence, its essential errors, its ephemeral core, its nature as the mode in which writing comes as close as it can to speaking extemporaneously.

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The ‘unassisted suicide’ of old media

Andrew Sullivan ceases blogging today, and one of his final posts is a discussion of modern media developments by old media companies.

CBC interviewed him about native advertising:

Sullivan’s case against native advertisement is powerful and succinct. “It is advertising that is portraying itself as journalism, simple as that,” he told me recently. “It is an act of deception of the readers and consumers of media who believe they’re reading the work of an independent journalist.”

Advertisers, he says, want to buy the integrity built up over decades by journalists and which, in the past, was kept at arm’s length. Now they will happily pay to imitate it: “The whole goal is you not being able to tell the difference.” Sullivan’s argument is so doctrinaire, so principled, that it makes bourgeois practitioners of the craft, like me, squirm.

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Let’s just totally ignore the High Court’s ruling shall we?

A decision to clear Cameron Slater of Privacy Act breaches could result in all bloggers being exempt from the legislation, the Director of Human Rights Proceedings says.

The director’s lawyer, Simon Judd, told the Human Rights Review Tribunal today there was nothing to distinguish Mr Slater from any other blogger who expressed their opinions on the internet.

-RadioNZ

Nothing? Really? How about a High Court ruling that he is a journalist?

A court’s recognition of WhaleOil blogger Cameron Slater as a journalist reflects the changing media landscape, the Newspaper Publishers’ Association (NPA) says.

Slater has won a High Court nod that he is a journalist and that his blog is a news medium

-Stuff

That is a pretty strong distinction don’t you think?

 But Mr Judd told the tribunal the case could set a precedent and result in every blogger being exempt from the Privacy Act if the charge was not upheld.

-RadioNZ   Read more »

Andrew Sullivan decides to quit blogging

One of my big influencers in blogging has decided to quit after 15 years.

One of the things I’ve always tried to do at the Dish is to be up-front with readers. This sometimes means grotesque over-sharing; sometimes it means I write imprudent arguments I have to withdraw; sometimes it just means a monthly update on our revenues and subscriptions; and sometimes I stumble onto something actually interesting. But when you write every day for readers for years and years, as I’ve done, there’s not much left to hide. And that’s why, before our annual auto-renewals, I want to let you know I’ve decided to stop blogging in the near future.

Why? Two reasons. The first is one I hope anyone can understand: although it has been the most rewarding experience in my writing career, I’ve now been blogging daily for fifteen years straight (well kinda straight). That’s long enough to do any single job. In some ways, it’s as simple as that. There comes a time when you have to move on to new things, shake your world up, or recognize before you crash that burn-out does happen.

The second is that I am saturated in digital life and I want to return to the actual world again. I’m a human being before I am a writer; and a writer before I am a blogger, and although it’s been a joy and a privilege to have helped pioneer a genuinely new form of writing, I yearn for other, older forms. I want to read again, slowly, carefully. I want to absorb a difficult book and walk around in my own thoughts with it for a while. I want to have an idea and let it slowly take shape, rather than be instantly blogged. I want to write long essays that can answer more deeply and subtly the many questions that the Dish years have presented to me. I want to write a book.

I want to spend some real time with my parents, while I still have them, with my husband, who is too often a ‘blog-widow’, my sister and brother, my niece and nephews, and rekindle the friendships that I have simply had to let wither because I’m always tied to the blog. And I want to stay healthy. I’ve had increasing health challenges these past few years. They’re not HIV-related; my doctor tells me they’re simply a result of fifteen years of daily, hourly, always-on-deadline stress. These past few weeks were particularly rough – and finally forced me to get real.

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Imagine how much time you’d spend in jail if you actually worked closely with the hacker

Imagine how much time you’d spend in jail if you actually worked closely with the hacker…especially if you actually helped plan the whole hack attack.

I’m looking at you Mr Hager, Mr Fisher and Mr Nippert.

A journalist with connections to the hacking collective Anonymous has been sentenced to five years in jail after posting online links to stolen data.

Barrett Brown originally faced charges punishable by more than 100 years in prison, but the sentence was reduced after he pleaded guilty last year.

He said he broke the law to reveal details of illegal government activity.

The case drew criticism from advocates of free speech and media rights organisations.

One of Mr Brown’s supporters is Glenn Greenwald, a journalist who publicised the National Security Agency (NSA) spying programme revealed by whistle-blower Edward Snowden.   Read more »

And they say my comments section is dreadful

The mainstream media and the disaffected left like to claim that the comments section here at WOBH is dreadful.

Fairfax owns used to own a fair chunk of Trade Me, even after they sold some down, until 2012 when they dumped the remaining shares.

Here is just one example of comments that stand at Trade Me.

deaththreat to PM Read more »

The problem with ‘ safe havens ‘

The Tor Project- Screen Shot

The Tor Project- Screen Shot

When Kim Dotcom provided a Cyber ‘ warehouse ‘ for people to upload stuff it was a great idea that could be used legitimately. Of course it could also be used for illegitimate purposes and the most popular downloads which made his business the most money tended to be the illegitimate ones.His argument was that he was not responsible for pedophiles sharing child porn on his site or hackers uploading hacked information or movies or books etc that they had no rights to as he just provided the ‘ warehouse ‘ to store their criminal goods. A similar problem exists at The Tor Project which on the face of it sounds like a legitimate idea.

The Tor network provides a safe haven from surveillance, censorship, and computer network exploitation for millions of people who live in repressive regimes, including human rights activists in countries such as Iran, Syria, and Russia.

People like that do need protection and so this sounds like a great idea. One slight problem though, it sounds like a great idea to hackers and other criminals as well who of course also use the network. As a result of the illegitimate use, the network are now under attack, a cyber attack. According to one of the commenters on the site is is because…

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