internet

My how the Media worm has turned

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My, how the Media worm has turned. The whole time this website was trying to get the message out to the public about Kim Dotcom the media consistently described him in the following ways…

The New Zealand Herald described him like this:

Tycoon could be kicked out of country for failing to disclose conviction.

…troubled internet millionaire Kim Dotcom has found himself kicked off the cloud storage site he founded.

Internet entrepreneur Kim Dotcom will face tougher new bail conditions and make a daily visit to the police for at least the next week.

But the Megaupload founder’s US lawyer, Ira Rothken, has tweeted that both Davison and Simpson Grierson are stepping down from Dotcom’s legal team.

Internet millionaire Kim Dotcom has lost his appeal

Claims by internet mogul Kim Dotcom of a conspiracy between the United States and New Zealand Governments do not have “an air of reality”, a High Court judge has ruled.

One News described him like this:

The internet entrepreneur is in a High Court battle over an attempt to extradite him to the US to face piracy charges.

Internet entrepreneur and Internet Party founder Kim Dotcom was joined by US journalist Glenn Greenwald at the Auckland Town Hall for the ‘Moment of Truth’ which Dotcom predicted would be a “bombshell” just days ahead of Saturday’s General Election.

T.V 3 described him like this:

Immigration NZ (INZ) says it will consider if there is any “liability” to deport internet millionaire Kim Dotcom, after it was revealed he failed to declare a conviction for dangerous driving when he applied for New Zealand residency.

Now however he is being described like this…

Read more »

UFB passes 10% uptake

The fibre rollout is progressing and uptake is growing, passing 10%.

Now if only Chorus would turn on the dark fibre in my street!

Broadband connections have increased nearly 40% over the past quarter according to the latest quarterly figures of the Government’s ultrafast broadband and rural broadband initiative.

The figures, released yesterday by Communications Minister Amy Adams, show around 536,000 end-users are now able to connect to UFB, though only 55,000 are connected. However, 15,500 of those connected to UFB in the three months to September, a 39% increase on last quarter.

The figures indicate a 10% uptake nationally, compared with a national uptake rate of 7% the previous quarter, with the project now 6% ahead of build schedule.

According to the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment, as of September, the UFB deployment progress was 100% complete for Northland. Waikato and Taranaki were sitting at 71% and 62% completed respectively, while Auckland was 26% complete, with Wellington at 29% and Canterbury at 36%.    Read more »

You can run but you can’t hide from the US government

I'm coming to steal your democracy

Kim Dotcom thinks that he can thumb his nose at the US legal system, well he has another thing to learn about doing things like that…they have a habit of biting you on the arse.

Billboard reports how the US is going after all his assets because they are declaring him a fugitive.

On Tuesday, the U.S. Department of Justice told a Virginia federal judge that Kim Dotcom and cohorts have no business challenging the seizure of an estimated $67 million in assets because the Megaupload founder is evading prosecution.

The government brought criminal charges against Dotcom in early 2012, but he’s been holed up in New Zealand awaiting word on whether he’ll be extradited. The government got antsy and this past July, brought a civil complaint for forfeiture in rem, a maneuver to firmly establish a hold over money from bank accounts around the world, luxury cars, big televisions, watches, artwork and other property allegedly gained by Megaupload in the course of crimes.  Read more »

From my cold, dead, modem

Regan at Throng writes:

Apparently the Chief censor has their knickers in a twist over Orcon and Slingshot’s Global mode options and is considering a range of charges according to reports.

New Zealand’s chief censor is considering bringing charges against Slingshot and Orcon, which both give customers access to websites with movies that could be either unclassified or banned in this country.

Global Mode gives Slingshot and Orcon customers access to overseas movie and television websites, like Netflix, that are normally blocked to people in this country because of copyright arrangements.

There is therefore the potential for New Zealanders to watch films on these sites that are unclassified in this country or banned.

This only proves how outdated the law must be and how little the Chief Censor understands how the internet works.

By definition, the Act, which covers all video content in the form of computer files, requires all said content to be classified. Any film, or video recording:   Read more »

Some advice for the opposition from Rodney Hide

Rodney Hide tells the opposition to find a better cause.

The Opposition is making heavy weather of trying to make Prime Minister John Key responsible for what Cameron Slater writes on his blog and in his personal communications.

I say in a kind and caring way that they should give it up. Because – and I say this even more caringly and kindly – Slater, aka the Whale, is not always responsible for what he writes.

By his own admission, Slater has had his battles with depression. By his own admission he is an embellisher.

Anyone who follows his blog knows him as a force of nature once he starts tapping his keyboard and pushing the upload button.

His blog is one man’s opinion, raw and unedited.

It is politics red and bloody and some of what you read you wonder if you really needed to know.

But back I go like a junkie. I enjoy the Whaleoil blog just like I enjoy the Left’s The Standard and The Daily Blog.

I’m not sure The Standard or the mouth breather at The Daily blog will appreciate that Rodney Hide enjoys their hate fuelled rants.

The blogs, as mad and as bad they are, add richness and diversity to political debate.

It’s true much of it is gossip. The blogs have lifted the lid on what was once confined to Bellamy’s. They have opened it up.

Political gossip always has an angle, juiciness trumps veracity and its effect can prove lethal.

But don’t blame blogs. Gossip has been used as a political weapon for as long as there’s been politics.    Read more »

How to get a .nz domain

Onlydomains.com

On September 30th the New Zealand Domain Commission is releasing the new top-level domain extension for New Zealand. Website owners can now drop the .net or .co and have a shorter more memorable domain such as whaleoil.nz. So how can you get in on this?

OnlyDomains.com is a global domain registrar, based here in New Zealand (Sunny Napier to be precise). They have been fairly under the radar until recently when they announced their sponsorship of the Super Black Racing V8 Supercar team, squarely planting their Kiwi flag in the ground.

As a Kiwi based company, OnlyDomains.com is ideally placed to help you secure your new .NZ website address, and can even help you to do this before the general public launch (and with a special promotion for WhaleOil readers – see the end of this post)

OnlyDomains.com has a system that allows you to pre-register your ideal .nz domain name, before general launch. By doing this, their automated system will attempt to secure the domain at the very first possible second, giving you the best chance of scoring your desired domain.

Click here to pre-register your .nz domain.  Read more »

Major changes to New Zealand domain names – .nz is coming!

 

Onlydomains.com

Major changes to New Zealand domain names – .nz is coming!

unnamed-1There have been some pretty big changes to the world of Internet addresses this year. New domains such as .xyz, .club, and .sex have now been released, meaning that people don’t have to worry so much if they missed out on their dream .com domain. Some of the biggest changes for Kiwi internet users have been the introduction of .Kiwi, and the even more important .nz. And OnlyDomains.com is here to help guide you through what this means both for people looking to register a new domain, and the 200,000 Kiwis who have already registered a New Zealand country code domain.

Up until now, kiwi websites had to have two levels, or two parts between the first dot and the end of the address – like whaleoil.CO.nz, or whaleoil.NET.nz. Now website owners have a choice and can skip the second level and go straight to the .nz – whaleoil.nz for example.

This new top-level country code for New Zealand is being released on September 30th and OnlyDomains.com has all of the answers for those affected. For people who have already registered a second-level domain such as .net.nz or .co.nz, your existing domain will put you in one of two categories:

Preferential Registration or Reservation (PRR)

This gives existing second-level domain registrants the right to register or reserve the matching top-level domain. For example, as the registrant of whaleoil.co.nz I can now go and register or reserve whaleoil.nz. Read more »

“These are some of the most serious allegations I’ve seen”

Really?

That is what David Cunliffe has claimed.

Peter Cresswell at Not PC explains why this is a ridiculous statement from David Cunliffe.

“These are some of the most serious allegations I’ve seen,” said David Cunliffe this morning about allegations that bloggers Whale Oil and Cactus Kate wrote “attack blogs” at the behest of a paying client and a justice minister “gunning for” a minion.

This both overstates and understates the power of blogs – and downplays some of the most serious scandals of recent years. (Is he blind? Did Mr Cunliffe not see Helen Clark buying an election with her taxpayer-funded pledge card, then retrospectively legislating to make it all legal?  Or Don Brash dealing secretively with a small but well-funded religious cult?)

So a blogger wrote “attack blogs” about a bureaucrat.  How hurtful. How harmful. I’m amazed the poor fellow wasn’t hospitalised.  Just imagine, being attacked by a blogger!    Read more »

Russia passes law to make high traffic bloggers part of media

Russia has changed their law to make high traffic bloggers part of the media, forcing them to adopt the same checks and balances other media organisation adhere and are subject to.

Not sure they have got the numbers right, but I guess you have to start somewhere.

The amendments to the law On Information, Information Technology and Information Protection plus other related laws, informally referred to as the law on bloggers, have become effective on August 1, RIA Novosti writes.

The law requires individuals whose blog attracts a daily readership of more than 3,000 to take on the full responsibilities of mass media outlets. President Vladimir Putin signed the bill into law on May 6 this year.

Before the enforcement of the law, the telecommunications authority, Roskomnadzor, published a methodology for calculating the number of subscribers of personal websites and social networking pages. Personal bloggers will be rated by the number of unique visitors and session duration (full loading estimated at no less than 15 seconds).  Read more »

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That’s inconvenient, Italy bans Mega for promoting distribution of pirated movies

Leopards never change their spots.

A court in Italy has banned Mega for promoting distribution of pirated movies.

The Megaupload founder’s new project Mega has been banned by an Italian court for promoting distribution of pirated movies. The hosting service is among the 24 blocked websites together with Russia’s largest email provider Mail.ru.

Court of Rome Judge Constantino De Robbio, ordered all Italian providers to restrict access to two dozen domains on Friday, Corriere Della Sera reported.

A large-scale blockade came at the request of a small local independent movie distributor, Eyemoon Pictures.

The company claimed that the websites in question distributed two of its movies – “The Congress” and “Fruitvale Station” – ahead of their release in Italian cinemas.

Mega already said that they’re going to appeal against the Court of Rome ban, which the company considers “illegal”.   Read more »