John Campbell

Some advice for the opposition from Rodney Hide

Rodney Hide tells the opposition to find a better cause.

The Opposition is making heavy weather of trying to make Prime Minister John Key responsible for what Cameron Slater writes on his blog and in his personal communications.

I say in a kind and caring way that they should give it up. Because – and I say this even more caringly and kindly – Slater, aka the Whale, is not always responsible for what he writes.

By his own admission, Slater has had his battles with depression. By his own admission he is an embellisher.

Anyone who follows his blog knows him as a force of nature once he starts tapping his keyboard and pushing the upload button.

His blog is one man’s opinion, raw and unedited.

It is politics red and bloody and some of what you read you wonder if you really needed to know.

But back I go like a junkie. I enjoy the Whaleoil blog just like I enjoy the Left’s The Standard and The Daily Blog.

I’m not sure The Standard or the mouth breather at The Daily blog will appreciate that Rodney Hide enjoys their hate fuelled rants.

The blogs, as mad and as bad they are, add richness and diversity to political debate.

It’s true much of it is gossip. The blogs have lifted the lid on what was once confined to Bellamy’s. They have opened it up.

Political gossip always has an angle, juiciness trumps veracity and its effect can prove lethal.

But don’t blame blogs. Gossip has been used as a political weapon for as long as there’s been politics.    Read more »

The fight is getting nasty, buy more popcorn

As the nasty knife fight inside Labour gets underway we can see that David Cunliffe is still at sixes and sevens.

Last night on Campbell Live he had this to say:

David Cunliffe: The reality is National has never gone out in two terms; that it’s very rare for a government to go out on [a] % growth rate, and it’s very, very hard when you’ve got distractions like Kim Dotcom

John Campbell: The 4% growth rate was predicted. It was very much in Treasury’s books when you made that speech 12 months ago . You promised Labour you could do it. You got 24%.

DC: 24.7% … Nobody is saying this is good enough … the hundreds of thousands of New Zealanders who needed a fresh start were disappointed by it.

JC: Why didn’t they vote for you?

DC: That’s the subject of a review.

JC: Hold on a sec. You are a leader, and you are a bright man. Why didn’t they vote for you?

DC: I think at the end of the day, people wanted stability. They wanted prosperity. They saw the current government, for now, delivering that for them, and they weren’t prepared to take what they saw as some kind of risk for a change.

Read more »

John Armstrong’s ‘Moment of Struth’ column was dead right

John Armstrong, I thought, had his moments during the campaign, losing the plot several times and abandoning his normally objective view of politics.

Let’s reprise his column of September 17, just three days before the election where he predicted there would be a back lash against Kim Dotcom and the left wing who embraced and invested in his conspiracy theories.

Hell hath no fury like a voter who feels he or she has been treated like a fool.

The political left was already paying a heavy price at this election for displaying the characteristics which leave voters stone cold – namely disunity, political incompetence and not a little arrogance.

The left may now pay an even bigger price on Saturday thanks to Kim Dotcom’s Moment of Truth evaporating into a Moment of Struth – as in “struth, was that all he had to reveal” after months of squashing much else far more worthy of debate out of the political picture.

So robust was Dotcom’s evidence of prime ministerial untruths supposed to be that it would sink John Key faster than the Bismarck. Instead it is Dotcom who is now facing a backlash for failing to deliver.

So far, that backlash is confined to media who have been strung along for months. Voters may be more tolerant – but only up to a point. They take objection to being hoodwinked.

Read more »

Are TV3’s ratings a reflection of their left lean?

Guest Post

henry-campbell
I have found watching the ratings between Campbell Live and Seven Sharp incredibly frustrating. Last year, for the first time, TV3 looked competitive at 7pm as TVNZ attempted to revamp their current affairs offering causing viewers to either switch over or switch off. On multiple occasions, John Campbell and his team drew in higher average audiences and looked to be on track to turn the tables on TVNZ who have dominated TV3 with a seemingly stranglehold on 7pm. Sadly, when TVNZ made changes again at the start of 2014, viewers abandoned Campbell Live in favour of the refreshed offering on One. Only once this year has TV3 come within a breath of having a higher average audience and that was back in February. Since then, it’s been one way traffic.

Most would agree that John Campbell’s approach to current affairs comes from a genuine place of advocacy. He’s also very passionate about it. I doubt anyone believes John isn’t genuine in his desire to help New Zealanders who are less fortunate but looking at the ratings, there seems to be a disconnect somewhere.

And then Carlos made this comment on twitter:

f3

Read more »

Cartoon of the Day

election-result

Post election Prebble

The Letter just came in and among some of the more amusing items (ACT has a strong brand?), these items deserve a wider audience?

TVNZ, TV3 and state radio called this election wrong.

The credibility of our news services has taken a huge hit.

Night after night TV and radio told us John Key was a liar.

First “Dirty politics” and then claims of mass surveillance were given not just top billing but saturation coverage.

The news blogs are going to be the big winners.

This election has been the clearest example yet of the main stream media picking a winner and doing everything they could to make it happen.  Radio New Zealand, TV3 and the NZ Herald had nailed their colours to the mast for such a long time, changing gear was no longer possible once they realised they were backing the wrong horse.

Sadly, it’s been seen as a left v right issue, when it’s really been a right v wrong issue.  By picking sides, and as it turned out, very much the losing side, these media organisations have lost customers and credibility.

Look at the numbers for Campbell Live since Hosking joined Seven Sharp.

Look at the NZ Herald subscription numbers while they are desperately trying to push others out at cost to keep their numbers up.

Viewers are turning off.  Paywalls have been postponed.   Read more »

Campbell will have a major sugar overload tonight

campbellJohn Campbell is going to have to eat an awful lot of lollies tonight.

Here at Campbell Live, we couldn’t wait for election night and took things into our own hands with lolly polls throughout the country.

It is nothing official and not terribly scientific but a whole lot of fun – despite the temptation we have held on to the lollies.

Here is a recap of all the lolly polls conducted throughout the country:

  • Te Tai Tokerau was won by Mana Party leader Hone Harawira.
  • East Coast Bays electorate was won by National’s Murray McCully.
  • Auckland Central electorate was won by Labour’s Jacinda Ardern.
  • Epsom electorate was won by National’s Paul Goldsmith.

Read more »

Cartoon of the Day

Credit:  SonovaMin

Credit: SonovaMin

Really? Unions are the solution to create proper journalism?

Laila Harre reckons unions are the key to solving the problem we have with our media in New Zealand.

Labour’s tame lap-bloggers at The Standard explain.

Laila Harre focused strongly on industrial relations: many of the problems we have now with the media and journalism are due to the demise of collective bargaining.  With collective bargaining a collective sense of professionalism develops. This produces a team environment, with senior journalists supporting and mentoring junior journalists.  This helps to develop and protect professional standards.

So what she is proposing is people like David Fisher and his dishonest, hagiographic, activist “journalism” be used to train new journalists.

Or Adam Bennett also from the Herald perhaps who this week called some one and lied about what a politician had said in oder to get his mark to commit to something based on that lie. The mark was smart enough to check, and to know what was being attempted.    Read more »

Cartoon of the Day

Credit:  SonovaMin

Credit: SonovaMin