John Drinnan

Quote of the Day

Twitter is full of trolls, even more so this election period.

Even the Herald’s claimed media writer/commentator John Drinnan thinks it’s a place with no accountability. But when he loses followers, his tactic is to try and shame them.

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Good luck doing that to Heather du Plessis-Allan.

Drinnan’s just been given a good serve.

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Fairfax hypocrites enter native advertising scam as well

September seems to have been the month to launch the biggest scam in news yet.

Native advertising…the fancy word that editorial bosses use to describe advertising dressed up as articles to fool the punters.

Yesterday I blogged about the Herald hypocrites and today we can see Fairfax are at it too.

Ironically it is 2Degrees that is into this boots and all at Fairfax.

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Hypocrisy and the NZ Herald

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A reader writes about the NZ Herald’s paid content…you know that terrible thing John Drinnan has been campaigning on Twitter against…ringing people’s bosses trying to get them sacked.

brand insightHi Cam

I was browsing through the Herald online (I know – more fool, me – in my defence, I only read it for the girlie pictures) and came across the new Brand Insight section (launched September 1 and now featured prominently on the front page).

What is a “Brand Insight”? According to the helpful explanatory popup, it’s this: “New Zealand Herald’s Brand Insight connects readers directly to the leadership thinking of many prominent companies and organisations.”

Sounds terribly worthy, doesn’t it?

Or you could click through to one of the stories, where you’ll find in the small print that Brand Insights are in fact paid content, published on behalf of an advertiser. In a nutshell, this is the Herald’s latest attempt to extract money from advertisers, in what’s called a “native advertising format” (or, as we oldtimers call it, advertorial).

“The high quality content, in line with journalistic standards, is often produced by the company or brand and must be of interest to readers. It is clearly signposted.” Yeah, right.

So how exactly is this different from what WOBH has allegedly been doing, accepting money from companies in return for writing about them?

Oh yeah, “clearly signposted”. Like, “connects readers directly to the leadership thinking of many prominent companies and organisations”.

Sure, that’ll do it.

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Wonders will never cease, keyboard interviewer Drinnan actually made a good point

John Drinnan, usually renowned for interviewing his keyboard has actually made a good point in his column yesterday.

It has been intriguing to see the reasoned response of opinion-makers to the Kill the Prime Minister song, and compare it with the witch-hunt against John Tamihere, which led to the broadcaster being sacked from RadioLive.

In this latest case, there have been questions about taxpayer support for the band @Peace, though this was unreasonable since the NZ On Air support was for the band, not the song. There was some chiding over the sexual references to the Prime Minister’s daughter, Steffi Key, and the obligatory cries of FFS. But overall, it was a sane response.

This was in marked contrast to the media storm that blew up over Tamihere, with the left approaching advertisers to withdraw from RadioLive and attacking Tamihere, Willie Jackson and anyone who dared suggest there were freedom of speech issues involved.

That issue came down to whether Tamihere asked the wrong questions of an unnamed young girl who called in to his and Jackson’s radio show over the Roastbusters allegations. While this person – Amy – has disappeared from sight, it appears that she was actually known to the broadcasters.    Read more »

Mediaworks About To Be Chopped Up Into Bits And Sold?

Congratulations are due to Mediaworks for appointing Mark Weldon to head their Group as CEO. He replaces Sussan Turner who left rather suddenly resigned and is exploring other career options.

Weldon has the perfect background for Mediaworks.   Ratings focused, driven, one way people management skills and effortlessly capable of building strong teams to enhance the shareholder value of an organisation.

Weldon has no background in media and the appointment suggests that TV producer director Julie Christie will continue to provide intelligence on the sector.

Such a comment by keyboard grump John Drinnan is particularly unfair.

NZX was the greatest reality soap opera in town under Weldon’s leadership, the casting couch of characters was enormous as disgruntled staff left and new bright eyed disciples were employed.  Indeed Mediaworks currently does not employ anyone on your television or radio with a larger ego than Weldon, even Willie Jackson, Sean Plunket and Duncan Garner combined can’t compete.  The clashes will continue to be ginormous and fill Drinnan’s column with rumours and innuendo for months on end.    Read more »

Who’s the Jackass now then?

This is the NZ Herald front page today.

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Unfortunately the lead story photograph is NOT a picture of Kiwi soldier Guy Boyland.

It is in fact a photo of deceased Jackass actor Ryan Dunn!

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“That is a big allegation to make” – Drinnan

On a Friday afternoon before a long holiday weekend, the media columnist at the NZ Herald, John Drinnan, published a piece stating around a dozen people at Radio New Zealand are losing their job.

Instead of reporting on something that was already known by those people losing their jobs, they read about it in the paper.

That’s a pretty tough way to discover you’re not going to enjoy your long weekend.

None of these people were named by Drinnan, so the next problem is that a fair proportion of Radio New Zealand staff were heading into a stressful three days instead of a relaxing break.

That was, until the NZ Herald published a retraction.

An opinion column by media columnist John Drinnan earlier today indicated that jobs cuts were imminent at Radio New Zealand following a board meeting yesterday. The RNZ board has since confirmed this is not correct. The Herald regrets the error and any distress it may have caused RNZ staff.

At this point, Duncan Garner chimed in via Twitter mocking Drinnan for his “apology”.  Drinnan replied with words to the effect that a correction was made and no apology was needed.

We have the paper correcting something, but the journalist is not prepared to say sorry for ruining the weekend of quite a number of people.  Not just 12-15, but everyone at Radio New Zealand that are now feeling pretty insecure about life.

Over at Throng, New Zealand’s leading media commentating web site, Regan Cunliffe put Drinnan’s feet to the fire with an article titled What else does John Drinnan make up?   Read more »

John Drinnan should stop interviewing his keyboard

It is widely thought by many, including those he shares an office with, that John Drinnan interviews his keyboard.

An opinion column by media columnist John Drinnan earlier today indicated that jobs cuts were imminent at Radio New Zealand following a board meeting yesterday. The RNZ board has since confirmed this is not correct. The Herald regrets the error and any distress it may have caused RNZ staff.

The full statement follows:

Statement from the Chairman of the Radio New Zealand Board of Governors
The Radio New Zealand Board Chairman, Richard Griffin, and the Radio New Zealand Board of Governors totally reject the suggestion in an article by John Drinnan in the New Zealand Herald on Friday 30th May that between 12 and 15 Radio New Zealand News staff are to lose their jobs and that the job cuts were approved by the Radio New Zealand Board of Governors yesterday.

The Herald regrets the error but not John Drinnan…who thinks there is nothing to be sorry about.    Read more »

Yesterday’s papers, are newspapers dead yet?

They might not be dead yet but they are flapping around like a snapper on the pier…gasping for air and relevance.

Even their owners know this and are prepared to say it out loud.

APN is focusing on radio because it does not consider newspapers a growth asset, shareholders were told at the media company’s annual meeting today.

APN owns The New Zealand Herald and radio stations NewstalkZB, Classic Hits, Radio Sport and ZM as well as popular Australian station KIIS.

APN chairman Peter Cosgrove said the company was discussing collaboration and partnerships with other publishing businesses.

Although not perceived as a growth asset, we will continue to manage our newspapers with diligence and dedication,” he said.

“We will explore all options with other industry players in a range of areas, including printing and distribution, to further reduce costs and extend their lives.

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Herald busted manufacturing immigration story

This morning the NZ Herald ran a story by Jared Savage.

Investigations by WOBH can reveal that the Herald has sat on this story since October 2013.

A wealthy Auckland businessman was given New Zealand citizenship against official advice after a Government minister lobbied the colleague who made the decision.

Maurice Williamson, the Minister of Building and Construction, and Prime Minister John Key then opened the first stage of a $70 million construction project launched by the Chinese-born developer after he became a citizen.

The following year, one of his companies made a $22,000 donation to the National Party.

The Department of Internal Affairs (DIA) recommended that the citizenship application of Donghua Liu be declined on the grounds that he did not spend enough time in New Zealand or meet English language criteria.

At first blush this looks bad, but is it?

Well not really. Some pertinent facts have been left out from the story.

For a start there is nothing wrong with the Minister of Immigration or Internal Affairs exercising discretion – it is their right to do so is and it is written into the legislation. Members of Parliament advocate for that discretion to be used constantly, and in some famous cases like Taito Phillip Field used as a matter of course by Labour’s immigration ministers.

But in order to obtain citizenship you must first have permanent residency, which is a much harder barrier to overcome. Read more »