John Drinnan

Bylined, photo, you’d think she had the idea all by herself [UPDATED]

See this article in the NZ Herald yesterday:

Herald-plagiarism

Gee, Rhonwyn Newson is an editor and all.

Then let’s see who is credited with the story at the bottom of the article.

herald-plagiarism2

Right…so the Herald and Rhonwyn Newson have claimed this article as their own work.    Read more »

About moderation, ideas and life

By Pete

The Cameron Slater that started blogging 9 years ago was sick, angry and lashing out.  What he wrote was vile, upsetting and visceral.  Yet there was a constant kernel of truth and a continuous provision of information and insights into the political process you could never get anywhere else.  A small audience began to grow.

As was the thing, back in the day, allowing non-moderated comments to appear was part of the deal.  It was a point of pride.

The theory was that smart readers would realise that the views of commenters were not those of the blog or its operator.  And Cam personally felt (and still does, if we’re to be honest), that free speech is sacrosanct to the point where he would allow anything to be written.

The problem was that he assumed readers would not connect those comments to him, and instead judge only the writer of such comments.

It’s no secret that since I’ve gotten involved, I’ve been busy mainstreaming Cameron Slater.  Knocking the rough edges off.  Making him sleep on things for another day before putting ‘pen to paper’.  That certainly improved the general acceptability of the blog, and the audience grew.  But we seemed to be hitting another barrier.

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Herald busted over native advertising

Have you read The NZ Herald and their 12 questions series?

What about the constant featuring of their Brand insights and the strange articles about people attending the University of Auckland MBA course?

Well wonder no more.

It is actually undisclosed paid advertising masquerading as journalism and boy are they happy about the results.

After my posts of yesterday this turned up on the tipline.

To: [REDACTED]
Subject: UABS and NZ Herald Partnership

Colleagues

As many of you will be aware, the Business School has been involved in running a marketing partnership with the New Zealand Herald over the past few months which we drove through the Graduate School of Management.  The New Zealand Herald took our programme into their Brand Insights initiative  around 2 months ago and the analytics have without doubt proven the campaign to be a success. The partnership delivered a mix of contributed articles from academics, a weekly blog from one of our current MBA students Sarah Stuart (well known NZ journalist, ex Deputy Editor of the Herald on Sunday and Editor of Woman’s weekly as well as the face of the Herald’s 12 questions series) and a video series using Sarah’s well known 12 questions format. We were also able to run advertising  for specific events for the MBA programme or promote Executive Education courses as part of the campaign page. The partnership ran over 6 months (we are finalising our last two videos at this time featuring Professor Kaj Storbacka and Dr Lester Levy and our final 3 contributed articles will run by mid Nov). Some highlights from the analytics of our campaign without going into pages of detail or graph overload show that the content was engaging, on average the blogs achieved excellent readership (unique views on some blogs hit well over 5,000 and on the aggregator over half a million impressions).  Average time spent reading the blogs was 3 minutes, similar time was spent on the videos and on the contributed articles.  When the content aggregator was used, naturally the blogs and articles were more prominent on the site.

The link below will take you to our page where you can view some of Sarah’s blogs and our academic staff contributed articles:

http://www.nzherald.co.nz/universityofauckland/news/headlines.cfm?c_id=1503679

And this link will take you to an example of one of the videos:

http://www.nzherald.co.nz/business/news/video.cfm?c_id=1503079&gal_cid=1503079&gallery_id=144775

Through analysis we were able to determine that the campaign drove traffic to the GSM website directly from the NZ Herald and those that visited the site were looking at between 2 to 6 pages after landing, suggesting a genuine interest in the programme, the requirements etc.  Read more »

Finally someone addresses the elephant in the room for the left wing

Philip Matthews is a Twitter troll, and a journalist. He is a lot like John Drinnan, just with a smaller newspaper to bleat on it.

His constant harping and screeching about Dirty Politics led me to block him, he like many journalists think Twitter is the real world. He still misses the point of Dirty Politics. It was an attempt to silence, in my case permanently, opposing political voices.

Nonetheless he has written an article in the DomPost addressing the elephant in the room…the left wings very own dirty politics brigade (but without the influence or relevance).

The left wing mistook Twitter and blogging for the real world, and failed in their attempts to get me.

But are they part of the problem rather than the solution….after all Martyn Martin Bradbury established The Daily Blog with union funding to be “a Whaleoil killer”…and failed. He never even got close to his stated goal of a million pagewiews a month before the election.

In a parallel universe, David Cunliffe is the prime minister of New Zealand presiding over a Labour-NZ First minority government in a happy arrangement with the Green Party. Internet Mana, backed by German entrepreneur Kim Dotcom, has a few MPs in Parliament, including veteran activist Hone Harawira.

ACT is already history and former Prime Minister John Key has taken a long holiday in Hawaii.

Wake up. The Left was soundly defeated in the 2014 election.

“I think it’s fair to say we haven’t had dreams in colour since September 20,” says Left-wing activist and blogger Martyn Bradbury.

He freely admits he got it horribly wrong. That was his election prediction above. He “didn’t consider for one moment” that voters would rally to National and that high levels of early voting meant that New Zealanders were backing Key.

Instead, Labour had its worst result since 1922, the Greens slipped below their 2011 peak and Harawira is out of Parliament. “Despondent” is a good word to describe how those on the Left feel.

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Corporates build their own newsrooms, feed the corporate media

Andrew Sullivan is a little despondent in his post about corporate newsrooms.

He suggests that sponsored articles or native advertising will win:

Because journalists will make far more money from it than the old, ethical variety. Because no one has come up with a business model that can compete with it for moolah. And, above all, because readers don’t really give a shit:

The article he quotes next is an interesting one, where Columbia Journalism Review looks at corporate newsrooms.

Not ones built by corporate media, but rather ones built be corporates to write their own content to feed to a lazy media.

By next year, Coca-Cola hopes to have killed the press release. It believes the corporate website is dead, and it’s shifting its money away from television advertising. It has little use for journalists who aren’t interested in stories Coke wants to tell. Instead, it’s decided that producing its own content is better than relying on others.

To that end, Coke—and Nestlé and Chipotle and Volkswagen and countless other companies—have blown up their marketing departments in recent years. They’ve infused them with something that looks closer to a newsroom, producing glossy magazines, blog networks, reported articles, long-form narratives, and compelling videos. One Volkswagen video alone, filmed in a Hong Kong movie theater, has drawn almost 29 million viewers on YouTube, proof that you don’t have to work in a newsroom to understand the dynamics of social media. Or check out a site produced by Red Bull on surfing: It’s filled with spectacular photography, short documentaries, the latest news on surfing, and very little about Red Bull energy drinks.

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Does John Drinnan actually read what he writes?

John Drinnan is a fool.

His latest column mentions the decision b the Press Council to open up membership finally to online media.

This is interesting because in current proceedings before the Human Rights Review Tribunal I have told I can’t be a journalist because i’m not a member of a voluntary regime like the Press Council, but the lawyer ignored the problem that until last week I couldn’t possibly join because their constitution wouldn’t allow it.

I also had to battle that premise int eh High Court, but fortunately Justice Asher saw through that attempt, not so you would know it from the perspective of the Human Rights Commission.

The idea of expanding the Press Council’s reach has been around for years and was given a boost after the Law Commission suggested digital media should join a combined media standards organisation, in return for receiving legal protections available to journalists. Then Justice Minister Judith Collins – a close friend of Slater – quashed that plan.

However the Press Council has since gone ahead with a scheme to represent digital media and blogs under its own steam, and that was unveiled this week.

But the ethics of bloggers and the media in general have come under deep scrutiny since Dirty Politics was published. Neville said it was clear in Press Council rules that publishers could not be paid for editorial.

“There is a grey area now with so-called native advertising, which is meant to be quality journalism which stacks up on its journalistic merits, even though it is sympathetic to one party.”

There were questions about whether the Press Council should have jurisdiction over native content, or if that should be covered by the Advertising Standards Authority.

Dirty Politics author Nicky Hager said the Press Council was getting into complex waters judging digital media on the basis of individuals rather than articles, and deciding whether they were journalism or not.

“My fear would be what could happen is that unscrupulous blogs could be given credibility but not end up with any accountability.

“Sometimes people are publishing public relations, and sometimes journalism,” he said.

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Quote of the Day

Twitter is full of trolls, even more so this election period.

Even the Herald’s claimed media writer/commentator John Drinnan thinks it’s a place with no accountability. But when he loses followers, his tactic is to try and shame them.

image001

Good luck doing that to Heather du Plessis-Allan.

Drinnan’s just been given a good serve.

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Fairfax hypocrites enter native advertising scam as well

September seems to have been the month to launch the biggest scam in news yet.

Native advertising…the fancy word that editorial bosses use to describe advertising dressed up as articles to fool the punters.

Yesterday I blogged about the Herald hypocrites and today we can see Fairfax are at it too.

Ironically it is 2Degrees that is into this boots and all at Fairfax.

sponsored content Read more »

Hypocrisy and the NZ Herald

hypocrites

A reader writes about the NZ Herald’s paid content…you know that terrible thing John Drinnan has been campaigning on Twitter against…ringing people’s bosses trying to get them sacked.

brand insightHi Cam

I was browsing through the Herald online (I know – more fool, me – in my defence, I only read it for the girlie pictures) and came across the new Brand Insight section (launched September 1 and now featured prominently on the front page).

What is a “Brand Insight”? According to the helpful explanatory popup, it’s this: “New Zealand Herald’s Brand Insight connects readers directly to the leadership thinking of many prominent companies and organisations.”

Sounds terribly worthy, doesn’t it?

Or you could click through to one of the stories, where you’ll find in the small print that Brand Insights are in fact paid content, published on behalf of an advertiser. In a nutshell, this is the Herald’s latest attempt to extract money from advertisers, in what’s called a “native advertising format” (or, as we oldtimers call it, advertorial).

“The high quality content, in line with journalistic standards, is often produced by the company or brand and must be of interest to readers. It is clearly signposted.” Yeah, right.

So how exactly is this different from what WOBH has allegedly been doing, accepting money from companies in return for writing about them?

Oh yeah, “clearly signposted”. Like, “connects readers directly to the leadership thinking of many prominent companies and organisations”.

Sure, that’ll do it.

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Wonders will never cease, keyboard interviewer Drinnan actually made a good point

John Drinnan, usually renowned for interviewing his keyboard has actually made a good point in his column yesterday.

It has been intriguing to see the reasoned response of opinion-makers to the Kill the Prime Minister song, and compare it with the witch-hunt against John Tamihere, which led to the broadcaster being sacked from RadioLive.

In this latest case, there have been questions about taxpayer support for the band @Peace, though this was unreasonable since the NZ On Air support was for the band, not the song. There was some chiding over the sexual references to the Prime Minister’s daughter, Steffi Key, and the obligatory cries of FFS. But overall, it was a sane response.

This was in marked contrast to the media storm that blew up over Tamihere, with the left approaching advertisers to withdraw from RadioLive and attacking Tamihere, Willie Jackson and anyone who dared suggest there were freedom of speech issues involved.

That issue came down to whether Tamihere asked the wrong questions of an unnamed young girl who called in to his and Jackson’s radio show over the Roastbusters allegations. While this person – Amy – has disappeared from sight, it appears that she was actually known to the broadcasters.    Read more »