John Key

Media Party in lockstep with Labour as they continue the Key smear

You know when John Key pastes Andrew Little in the house, the story is well down the hour and they lead with something else…like Leicester City winning the Premier League wogball.

They still rolled out Patrick Gower to try to shock horror his way though a pretty lame attempt by Little and James Shaw to continue the smear.

Prime Minister John Key has denied in parliament that he had anything to do with IRD’s decision not to review foreign trust rules.

Mr Key faced a grilling at question time today over an issue that’s been festering since early last week when it was revealed his personal lawyer, Ken Whitney, used his name when he lobbied against tightening the rules.

Mr Little asked Mr Key about people close to him receiving “special treatment” and Mr Key denied that.

He said Mr Whitney and a group of trust lawyers met Mr McClay to discuss their concerns, which was standard procedure.

“They didn’t get special treatment. They were entitled to raise their concerns,” he said.   Read more »

John Key’s lawyer goes under the bus

It appears the John Key’s lawyer has been told he needs to take one for the team.

Lawyer didn't speak for me

Lawyer Ken Whitney “misrepresented” John Key

Prime Minister John Key says his lawyer misrepresented him while lobbying another minister about a potential crackdown on the foreign trusts industry.

It emerged last week that Mr Key’s personal lawyer, Ken Whitney, had lobbied the Government in 2014 because of concerns that the foreign trusts regime was about to change. Read more »

What is a “strong budget”?

Photo: RNZ / Diego Opatowski

Photo: RNZ / Diego Opatowski – an earlier budget

 

Prime Minister John Key is signalling an ongoing enthusiasm for the job and is promising a strong government Budget this month.

He’s been leader of the National Party for ten years and Prime Minister of the country for eight.

“I am just as excited about the year ahead as I have ever been,” he said in a speech to National’s central North Island regional conference in Waikato.

The next step is setting out the Government’s future plans in the Budget on May 26. Read more »

This week: John Key v The World

John Key

Last week, Key was forced to defend an approach by his personal lawyer Ken Whitney, who was revealed to have lobbied the Government over changes to tax laws.

The week earlier, he had to bat away questions over a Niue resort contract won by National Party donors, but a misfire on the issue also left Little exposed.

He was forced to defend the sting, while trying to deflect threatened legal action for drawing links where there were none. Read more »

Hide: John Key’s Land Tax policy will fail, just as it is designed to do

The land tax on foreigners is the perfect policy for John Key: it won’t work, won’t upset voters, shows he’s “doing something” and, just to be sure, he’s floated the policy to gauge reaction and to poll.

Not upsetting voters is crucial. No one likes paying tax. But making others pay – especially “the rich” and, even better, rich foreigners – is a plus. The policy won’t lose votes and will win some. Making foreigners pay for our government is smart politics.

That the policy fails is important. There are more homeowners than home buyers. The expectation is not just that house prices stay high but that they ever increase. No government will survive the bursting of the housing bubble.

I am confident the policy won’t work. The Government’s number one policy agency, the Productivity Commission, spent more than a year studying housing affordability and produced a 300-page report concluding against fiddling the tax system as any sort of cure.

The commission spent another year coming up with a 350-page report of policies that would work. Such is politics that policies that won’t work are favoured over those that would.

Key learned his politics from the master, Helen Clark. She developed the floating of policy ideas ahead of any announcement. Key has perfected it.

And the Labour Party have once again been driven into a corner where they don’t want to be, simply because they continue to see opposing everything Key proposes as the most important strategy.   Read more »

Tagged:

Working for New Zealand

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via The Telegraph

 

John Key was chatting about trade with the Indian PM today, and is scheduled to do the same with the French Premier tomorrow.

The first visit to New Zealand by a French prime minister in 25 years is about to begin.

Manuel Valls is due to arrive in Auckland on Sunday and departs on Monday.

Prime Minister John Key has said it’ll be a short but important visit. Read more »

John Key writes to Mark Weldon about the Barry decision

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Beehive Letters @BeehiveLetters John Key to Mark Weldon Re: Hilary Barry #nzpol #satire / Twitter

Hooton on the rise of King Peters

Matthew Hooton was one of the first to posit that Winston Peters is aiming for a big swansong to leave politics.

The polls are pointing to that conclusion.

He’s never been Prime Minister, but wants to at least have some time in the job.

Sceptics of the Peters’ plan all miss two important points. The first is that the people of New Zealand simply aren’t stakeholders in post-election negotiations. No one voted for Mr Peters to become Jim Bolger’s treasurer in 1996 or Helen Clark’s foreign minister in 2005. On both occasions, voters would have considered the very idea laughable – and, indeed, I was laughed at on Radio New Zealand’sNine to Noon in 2004 when I first raised the idea of Mr Peters becoming foreign minister.

More recently, it’s doubtful New Zealanders have really wanted United Future’s Peter Dunne to have responsibility for tax collection or drug policy, or Act’s David Seymour to set up charter schools. But, immediately after an election, the next is a political lifetime away and the politicians go for whatever they can get, regardless of what voters think.

The second point is that a Peters-chaired government would not be seeking a second term anyway. If Mr Peters’ aspirations could be negotiated back to a single year, Andrew Little or a new National leader would have to wait just 12 months to become prime minister and would then have two full years to refresh the government and make a pitch for re-election. Sir Winston would be safely packed off to Observatory Circle or New Zealand House.

Ambitious politicians would have little doubt they could get voters to forget about the controversial origins of their government in that timeframe. Do you recall what the political controversy du jour was even six months ago? (Hint: in early November I wrote about the Royal New Zealand Navy’s invitation to the US to send a vessel to its birthday party later this year.)

Read more »

Nasty Tamati calls McClay corrupt

Screen Shot 2016-04-29 at 4.43.24 PM

Tamati Coffey, bar owner, former weatherman and Labour Party windbag for Rotorua, has gone full retard on Rotorua MP Todd McClay.

You know those Panama Papers that tell people Aotearoa is a great place to launder money?

The NZ Herald has highlighted in the link below how Todd McClay put the IRD’s last review of foreign trusts and their taxes on ice, coincidently around the time John Key’s personal lawyer lobbied for him to do so.

A review that would’ve stopped our global embarrassment in the Panama Papers should it have been allowed to continue.

Mr McClay says the idea he was influenced by his boss’s lawyer “is insulting”, however when you read the corruption trail below, you’ll think being told it’s insulting is the insulting part.

Read more »

Cunliffe’s Panama smear fails to stick as OIO declares “no laws were broken”

Yesterday David Cunliffe tried to smear a property owner; today his smear is in tatters.

The Overseas Investment Office says it is satisfied with the decision to allow a foreign company linked to the Panama Papers scandal to buy New Zealand farmland.

The Government agency, which vets all large or sensitive foreign investments in New Zealand, said it had no evidence that Panama-based company Ceol & Muir had breached any laws through its connection to Panama law firm Mossack Fonseca.

“The Overseas Investment Office [OIO] is satisfied that due process was followed in assessing a consent application by Ceol & Muir,” the agency said this afternoon.

Millions of documents leaked from Mossack Fonseca earlier this month showed that the law firm played a key role in helping the world’s wealthy hide their money and assets in foreign trusts, some of which was linked to criminal activity.   Read more »