John Key

National quite happy to damage companies and devalue their brands

Perhaps the National party need to reacquaint themselves with their founding principles, which say:

To promote good citizenship and self-reliance; to combat communism and socialism; to maintain freedom of contract; to encourage private enterprise; to safeguard individual rights and the privilege of ownership; to oppose interference by the State in business, and State control of industry”.

Certainly, John Key and Sam Lotu-Iiga have scant memory of those principles despite being the leader and a minister in a National-led government.

The bill that will force cigarettes to be sold in plain packets is back in parliament and on track to become law.

It passed its second reading on Thursday after being on hold since 2014.

The government last month confirmed it was going to put it through, and unveiled the proposed new brown-green packaging which is similar to that used in Australia.

Prime Minister John Key said at the time plain packages could be on the shelves early next year.

The government first mooted plain packaging back in 2012, the year Australia introduced it, and the bill passed its first reading in February 2014.

It went to a select committee, which supported it, but the government didn’t want to take it any further at that time because it was worried about the possibility of costly legal challenges from big multi-national tobacco companies.

The Australian government was being sued at the time, but in December last year legal action by Philip Morris failed.

Read more »

When will National get the point? First the UK & now Australia treat immigration seriously

John Key fails to understand the problem, and so do Labour.

A change in government in Australia is unlikely to change the country’s hard-line immigration policy.

One-hundred-and-seventy-four New Zealanders are currently awaiting deportation after their visas were revoked.

Shane Martin — bikie and high-profile immigration deportee — had his visa cancelled in March over alleged links to the Rebels motorcycle club.

“It’s devastating,” said Shane’s brother, Dean Martin in April. “I’ve been over here 26 years and he’s all I have. It’s been him and I, and he’s a good man, no criminal convictions. They’ve got him on association. That’s not good enough.”   Read more »

Key dampens down Winston’s rallying cry for the people to take back power

Winston Peters was the only NZ politician to predict Brexit occurring.

Understandably, he is crowing about it and telling voters that they too can take back their country…by voting for him of course.

John Key has other ideas:

Prime Minister John Key is not buying the line from NZ First leader Winston Peters that the UK vote to leave the European Union is a wake-up call for democracies everywhere, including New Zealand.

“I don’t think you can really compare and contrast something that’s happening half a world away with very different circumstances,” Mr Key told reporters on Saturday.

If anything, New Zealanders may appreciate the stability they have.

On Friday (NZT) the UK voted in a referendum to leave the European Union, causing turmoil in world financial markets and triggering the exit of UK Prime Minister David Cameron by October.

New Zealand is in a vastly different position to the UK, Mr Key says.

“We can control our migration, they can’t,” he says.

The New Zealand economy is also in a much stronger position than the UK’s, he says.

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Key tries to calm down the Brex-panic

The Brexit uncertainty has hit the financial markets, but more so because none of them were hedging against this result and so the dumping has been epic.

Prime Minister John Key says markets will come to terms with Britain’s decision to exit the EU, come back to a normalised state and then settle.

The United Kingdom yesterday voted to leave the European Union (EU) after a historic referendum.

Speaking in Auckland this afternoon, Mr Key said New Zealand companies should not worry about anything for now, re-negotiation obviously would take a while.

He said the government has had assurances from both Britain and the European Union that there will be no change in access for New Zealand goods or people until new conditions are negotiated.

The move by Britain to leave the European Union shocked global markets and caused the British pound to plummet to its lowest point against the US since 1985.

Mr Key said New Zealand would not be directly affected by the move, and the uncertainty in the markets that the British withdrawal had caused was likely to be the most immediate impact.

The markets appear to have overreacted but that was because they were surprised by the result. Britain won’t actually start to leave the EU for at least a few months, and then the process is one that takes some years. All of this means that today’s drops are about speculators minimising their losses rather than a loss of faith in the fundamentals of the British economy.

Give it a little while and the markets will be jumping back in on the good bargains sitting around. Read more »

Key 2 days ago: Brexit bad for NZ. Key now: Brexit makes no difference

John Key is losing the plot. He’s all over the place on Brexit like a mad woman’s poo.

Two days ago John Key and Murray McCully told the NZ Herald that Brexit would be bad for New Zealand:

Mr Key, who has said he would prefer it if the UK stayed in the EU, said New Zealand officials were reviewing what could happen in the event the Brexit camp wins.

“There is a two-year period if they do vote to leave where they are still part of the union…so we’d have a couple of years to work on that.

“Superficially it would affect things like, for instance, the free trade agreement we are negotiating with the EU, we would obviously work on the migration issues and how those rules might work.”

Last week Foreign Minister Murray McCully said New Zealand has worked on shoring up its relations with other European countries which will limit any ramifications for New Zealand if the United Kingdom votes leave.

Mr McCully said the impact of a Brexit result on New Zealand would be “changes in degree only”.

“If the UK were to leave the EU, it would mean an increasing reliance by us on other relationships in Europe that we have regarded as increasingly important anyway.

“It obviously is easier if the UK is in, because we’ve got a large traditional friend that remains a member.

“But we’ve been working on the assumption for quite some time that we can’t be complacent about the European relationship.”

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Does it do good or does it feel good?

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In a continuation of the article about the differences between the left and the right’s worldview, let’s analyse a 2007 political policy decision by asking these questions:

Does it do good?

Does it feel good?

In 2007 the Labour government changed the law so that the intellectually disabled would be paid the minimum wage. This was a feel good policy and they ignored the many families (including my own) that begged them to reconsider. We told them it would hurt intellectually disabled men and women who needed a lot of supervision and staff support in order to be able to work. If they forced sheltered workshops to the pay minimum wage then they would have to close. Businesses who previously were happy to take on a disabled person would shut their doors because an intellectually disabled person needs support to do their job, unlike an able-bodied person.

The Labour government, under Helen Clark, ignored the pleas of families all over New Zealand because, to them, this was a policy that looked great on paper and made people ignorant of the truth feel good.

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Key says tolls would be offset by petrol tax reductions

John Key says that if tolls are contemplated then there should be corresponding reductions in petrol taxes.

Prime Minister John Key says petrol taxes could be reduced to offset the costs of proposed road tolls in Auckland.

Mr Key said today that direct charging for road users, which is now being considered by the Government and Auckland Council, was not about “socking it to the consumer” and could be matched with reductions in other levies.

He made the comments after the Labour Party warned that road tolls could cost regular Auckland commuters up to $10 a day, or $2500 a year.

A joint Government-Auckland Council report released yesterday said that road charging was needed to fix the city’s worsening gridlock.   Read more »

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Send our best – the NZSAS – and stop the obfuscation

John Key needs to stop considering and send our best troops to hurry up the process of getting these Daesh jihadi scumbags on the fast track to meeting Allah and the 72 virgin goats that are waiting for them.

John Key has revealed he considered sending the Special Air Service, or SAS, to Iraq instead of extending the military trainers’ deployment.

The SAS is New Zealand’s most elite military unit, and Mr Key said the United States has specifically asked for its elite troops in the fight against Islamic State.

He said all options were on the table as the Government looked at what to do in Iraq.

“[The SAS] could have gone there in a training role or other roles, and at the moment we don’t think that is appropriate,” Mr Key said.   Read more »

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Guest Post: How a conceited NZ Media failed their PM, John Key, on Fiji visit

by Thakur Ranjit Singh

As the NZ Airforce Hercules eased into a very warm Nausori Airport in Fiji with its Prime Minister John Key, Frank Bainimarama, stood tall at the tarmac, with his head held high on 9 June, 2016.

He has effectively passed a message to Australia, as well as New Zealand that he could survive without their support. So, he did. In response, New Zealand Prime Minister John Key has been expedient to play by the new rules: “It’s time to put the past behind us and move forward.”  Indeed, NZ needs Fiji’s support and vote for Helen Clark to be the next Secretary General of United Nations.

Professor Robbie Robertson from Swinburne University of Technology in Melbourne summed it well when he spoke about NZ and Australia’s attempt at punishing Fiji and freezing it out of regional blocs. “They assumed in the past they could pressure Fiji and bring it to its knees,” says Swinburne’s Robbie Robertson. “They failed.”

So did the New Zealand media. This was an opportunity for them to appreciate and understand Fiji. But sections of a White Kiwi media has been conceited and vindictive, hence they wasted this chance. And in doing so they did not hurt Bainimarama, but, and let down their own PM, and contributed to him losing face amongst Kiwis back home. The reaction of New Zealand media to Bainimarama’s 2,400 word speech was only confined to some ten percent of that speech which kicked the butt of a wanting NZ media.  “……there appears to be a substantial body of opinion in New Zealand – led by your generally hostile media – that what has happened in Fiji somehow lacks legitimacy. That somehow, I lack legitimacy and my government lacks legitimacy. This is simply not borne out by the facts. We have moved on but it would appear that the New Zealand media has not.”

On the media ban on journalists, the Fijian PM said that no one who reported on events in Fiji fairly and in a balanced manner was excluded. While accepting fair criticism, Bainimarama said he “cannot allow the wilful propagation of false information that damages the national interest and undermines our vulnerable economy.” He effectively told NZ media owners to send someone who respected the facts and the right of people to know the truth, and not some twisted concoction.   Read more »

Sack her then

John Key says Paula Bennett’s staff were wrong to have discussed a police investigation with dodgy journalists who don’t respect their sources.

The Social Housing Minister’s staff should not have discussed a police investigation into the Te Puea marae chairman, says Prime Minister John Key.

The minister, Paula Bennett, apologised to Te Puea marae chairman Hurimoana Dennis last week after one of her press officers told a journalis the was being investigated by the police.

The Auckland marae has been taking in dozens of homeless families, many of which have found new homes.

At a meeting with Mrs Bennett to discuss what help officials could provide to the marae, Mr Dennis told the minister about the police investigation – information one of Mrs Bennett’s staffers then passed on to a reporter.

“There was a sense it was more widely known than maybe it was and I think that was the mistake that the staff member [made],” Mr Key told Morning Report.    Read more »