John Key

Will John Key hold himself to the same standards he held Maurice Williamson to?

Whale Oil Blogger Cameron Slater Portrait Session

The other day in parliament John Key stated that when he spoke to me it wasn’t in his capacity as Prime Minister.

This is interesting because one of the reasons he sacked Maurice Williamson was because of the fact that he was a minister and that you are ALWAYS a minister.

It didn’t matter to him then that Maurice Williamson wrote his letters or made his phone calls in his capacity as a local MP.

Not one bit.¬† Read more »

NZ Parliament changes security in response to Canada shooting

qwwq

Hey, I thought we weren’t living in a strategically hostile environment?

Perhaps we just need to have Russel Norman and his acolytes stand guard at all parliamentary access points? ¬† Read more »

Slippery John or Common sense John?

John Armstrong isn’t talking about himself, of course

Norman asked Key how many times he had spoken to Whale Oil blogger Cameron Slater or sent a text.

“None in my capacity as Prime Minister,” Key replied. That wording was very deliberate.

Key’s argument is that any communications with Slater occurred in his capacity as leader of the National Party, not as Prime Minister. The distinction is important. It allows Key to wriggle free from his detractors, even if it is not very becoming.

As Prime Minister, Key is accountable to Parliament for his Government’s actions. He is not accountable to Parliament for the actions and behaviour of the National Party. Any Opposition question straying into the latter’s territory must be ruled out of order by Parliament’s Speaker.

Labour’s Chris Hipkins, however, sought to close off this escape route by asking whether Key had ever phoned or sent a text to Slater on his Government-supplied phone.

“I am not 100 per cent sure of that,” Key replied to mocking laughter from the Opposition benches.

But Winston Peters suggested there was something “particularly disturbing” about the Prime Minister’s first reply. If the Speaker, David Carter, allowed it to stand there would be no accountability to Parliament at all. Carter dismissed Peters’ argument, but later agreed to have another look at transcripts of the question time exchange.

The question to be resolved is whether Key should get away with determining which particular hat he is or was wearing at which particular time, and more so when the hat-switching is designed to get him off a very uncomfortable political hook.

I can’t recall the PM contacting me, ever, as the PM. ¬†As in, what he wanted to communicate about had to do specifically with the office of the Prime Minister or prime ministerial duties, responsibilities or needs. ¬† Read more »

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The best strategy when you find you are flogging a dead horse is to dismount

Yes Russel, it's dead

Yes Russel, it’s dead

A wise bloke I know has a saying, one that I use often.

He says to people who seek out his business advice, usually too late I might add, that when you find yourself flogging a dead horse, then the best strategy is to dismount, and find another horse.

Which brings me to Russel Norman and his pathetic and I might add in some case defamatory attacks on me in parliament.

Did he not see the election results?

Of course the complicit media, and yes they are complicit as time will show, of course jumped in boots and all.

Heat on PM over Slater links¬†–¬†3News NZ
PM refuses to answer Slater questionsRadio New Zealand
Key under more pressure over links with bloggerTVNZ¬† Read more »

Ongoing conspiracy

Once everything is out in the open, it will be clear that Dirty Politics was part of a much larger criminal conspiracy.

The involvement in this is so wide-ranging that it surprises me that the Greens and TV3 have revived the issue by putting pressure on John Key in the house and then, of course, whipping it into a storm in the ‘media’

The Prime Minister has had the heat put on him by Opposition parties about his relationship with Whale Oil blogger Cameron Slater during the first question time since the Dirty Politics book was published.

Green Party co-leader Russel Norman led the attack on John Key, asking him how many times he had spoken to or sent text messages to Slater since November 2008.

“None in my capacity as Prime Minister,” Mr Key replied.

“I think it’s been well-established in this House for a long period of time that Prime Ministers wear a variety of different hats ‚Äď that includes as leader of the National Party, and can include as a citizen.

“I happen, for the record, to use my ministerial service-funded cellphone to ring my wife. When I ring my darling wife and I put the cat out at night, I do that in my capacity as a husband, not as Prime Minister.”

Investigative journalist Nicky Hager’s book, released in August, drew connections between Slater and a National Party staff members and Ministers.

The book says Slater was fed information from National Party sources to use in attack posts on his blog.

The book has no proof. ¬†Only inferences. ¬†That doesn’t stop the media from pretending it is hard fact.

Read more »

Armstrong: John Key’s hidden objective

There is some life in John left – he’s seen right through John Key’s plan

Today’s Speech from the Throne outlining the new National minority Government’s legislative and policy programme is unusually non-contentious. So non-contentious that it seems rather bland.

And that is just the way the Prime Minister would like the speech to be viewed – solid, if unspectacular.

You had to wait until the Governor-General had read the last paragraph of the speech for a definitive statement on John Key’s real agenda behind his Government’s agenda.

That final sentence notes that National is “privileged” to have won the trust and goodwill of New Zealand voters for a third time and will seek to re-earn that trust and goodwill “every day” over the next three years.

In other words, Key’s mind is already intently focussed on how his Government avoids the third-term blues and matches Sir Keith Holyoake’s 1960s achievement of winning four straight elections – something which is even more difficult under a proportional electoral system like MMP compared to the previous first-past-the-post system which had a built-in bias favouring National. Read more »

Our ISIS problem solved: Iraqi PM doesn’t want our help

Sending the SAS or not to send the SAS?   Key vs the left and the media?   All of this is no longer a problem.

Iraqi Prime Minister Haidar al-Abadi [yesterday]ruled out any foreign ground intervention to assist government forces in retaking territory lost to jihadists and urged Sunnis to give up such hopes.

Abadi was speaking in the city of Najaf after a rare meeting with the most revered figure among Iraqi Shiites, Grand Ayatollah Ali al-Sistani, and before a trip to neighbouring Iran.

“No ground forces from any superpower, international coalition or regional power will fight here,” Abadi told reporters, reiterating previous remarks on the issue.

“This is my decision, it is the decision of the Iraqi government.”

Some officials and Sunni tribal leaders in areas most affected by the unrest have argued the world should step up its involvement from air strikes to a ground intervention against the Islamic State (IS) jihadist group.

Ignoring the fact that ISIS are quite happy to have foreign boots on the ground, the fears of the Iraqi PM seems to be more about being invaded by stealth: ¬† Read more »

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National all rhetoric on housing, but little is delivered

How the government got through the election without this particular policy failure biting them in the bum is beyond me.

It’s been revealed the Government’s flagship housing policy has delivered just five homes in its first year.

And in a week where Auckland’s house prices reached a record high, the Government’s strategy has been labelled an utter failure by the Opposition.

The Government last year promised to get on top of Auckland’s housing crisis by building new subdivisions. Tens of thousands of homes would be built in fast-tracked zones called special housing areas.

“We know this has been a problem that’s been around for 30 to 40 years, it’s not going to develop overnight and it’s not going to be fixed overnight,” says Prime Minister John Key.

Granted, Len Brown and his band of merry troughers have a large part to play.  But five houses?  The private sector could have put up 5 houses.  It is a terrible result, and one that needs turning around.

Read more »

Key signals SAS involvement in ISIS theatre

SAS-Baddass

Hand up who didn’t see this coming? ¬† Patrick Gower reports

 

Prime Minister John Key says Kiwi troops going into Iraq as trainers is a real possibility. It would follow Australia’s lead, which is sending its SAS as advisors.

Any day now Australia’s SAS will be back in Iraq to help the fight against Islamic State militants after Australian Foreign Minister Julie Bishop flew into Baghdad to get final sign-off on their role “to advise and assist the Iraqi government in building up the capacity of the Iraqi Security Forces”.

“Training is definitely an option,” says Mr Key.

“Training”.

Read more »

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Good point John, but those whingers don’t vote for ya

The people who whinge about affordable housing and the fact they can’t afford to buy their million dollar house are probably not National voters.

John Key has given some sound but unpalatable advice for these whingers who have been brought up thinking the world owes them a living, or at the very least a million dollar house next to where their parents lived so they can dump the grand kids every time they want to go out to the swanky restaurants that infest their neighbourhood.

First home buyers in Auckland might have to consider an apartment in order to get onto the property ladder, Prime Minister John Key says.

His comments follow the release of new CVs for Auckland, which have soared since 2011, particularly in city-fringe suburbs.

There are fears the mostly higher CVs could lead to rates increases well in excess of the 3.7 per cent planned for homeowners by Mayor Len Brown next year.

The latest figures show CVs across the city have risen an average of 34 per cent since 2011, and in Hobsonville a whopping 65 per cent.

Mr Key told TVNZ’s Breakfast show today the valuations reflected what had been happening in Auckland over the past three years. ¬† Read more »

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