John Minto

The insidious creep of “justified” left-wing violence

Shamlessly stolen from David Farrar’s Kiwiblog:

Geoffrey Miller writes:

A long thin country, marked by its diversity of landscapes. A small population, outflanked by bigger and more powerful neighbours.

An increasingly multicultural society with a significant indigenous group.

It could be New Zealand.

But it’s Sweden.

Like New Zealand, Sweden long had a tradition of personal, retail politics in which politicians rub shoulders with voters as apparent equals. That’s what one expects in a small country.

But there is one big difference between Sweden and New Zealand.

Sweden has suffered not one, but two political assassinations. The first, in 1986, was the murder of then Prime Minister Olof Palme.

The second, in 2003, was the killing of foreign minister Anna Lindh.  Had it not been for her untimely death, Lindh was in line to be Prime Minister.

We should keep Sweden’s experiences in mind when reflecting in the increasingly dangerous level of political vitriol that New Zealand has seen in recent months.

This vitriol is supported by John Minto and Sue Bradford who have backed the protester who poured stuff over Brownlee. Their view seems to be that so long as you are on the side of “right” (ie agree with their politics) then it is legitimate to assault politicians. Read more »

Losers to go for a walk, sorry… hikoi, to highlight state housing sale

John-Minto

Stop selling our state houses protest hikoi to parliament – John Minto

SHAN (State Housing Action Network) is organising a protest hikoi to parliament to demand National MPs and their allies stop the sale of state houses.

Groups of state house tenants and supporters will come from all over the country to converge on parliament on Tuesday 13th October (the first sitting day of parliament after the holiday recess)

“We are appalled that in the middle of a housing crisis for low-income tenants and families the government is trying to sell state houses to the private sector.” Read more »

New Zealanders live in an “incredibly benign strategic environment”?

sssssss

A New Zealand man has been named on an Islamic State (IS) “kill list”, leaked by hackers overnight.

The group, who call themselves the Islamic State Hacking Division, released personal information of hundreds of members of the military and government – mostly from the United States.

The information says the man in question lives in Auckland, but his father says that is incorrect.

He says his son currently lives overseas and was shocked to see his name on the list.

“Yes I am [worried]… more so for the fact that he’s got absolutely no connection to the military.” Read more »

Internet Party spending causes further embarrassment

Pam Corkery 2014

Kim Dotcom’s failed Internet Party has been dealt another humiliating blow.

Final election returns reveal $3.5 million was given to the Internet Party by Dotcom. It ended up getting 34,094 votes – that means Dotcom spent $102 per vote.

The election returns reveal the party’s explosive press secretary Pam Corkery was paid $15,000 for her 15 weeks’ work – that’s $1000 a week.

Party Leader Laila Harre was paid $66,000 – more than $4000 a week.
The party spent more than $1 million on election related advertising, including $122,000 for a YouTube parody of Prime Minister John Key and US President Barack Obama. It also spent $21,000 on T-shirts. Read more »

US Charter Growth 14% in one year

While PPTA, NZEI, the LAbour aprty and other assorted loons are still holding to their “failed model overseas” lines, while producing no evidence to support their claims, it appears no one appears to have told parents who are voting with their feet and sending their =kids in increasing numbers to charter schools.

The Washington Post reports:

The National Alliance of Public Charter Schools estimates in a new reportthat 2.9 million children now attend U.S. charter schools, up 14 percent from last school year.

More than 500 new charter schools opened in the 2014-2015 school year and 200 charters were closed for reasons ranging from poor academic performance to financial problems, according to the organization.   Read more »

The delusions of John Minto

The next big thing that Hone Harawira and John Minto has got going is Mana News.

And they are straight into bizarre conspiracy theories…and likely a few defamation suits.

Eleanor Catton has managed to reveal the mechanism of the National party media dictatorship this could be extremely dangerous for the survival of our democracy. According to Sean Plunkett you are not permitted to criticise the National government its unpatriotic and against the people of New Zealand.  Too many reporters within journalism have intimate relationships with the national party that are a conflict of interest designed to mislead the New Zealand public. These reporters are holding back real journalists like Andrea Vance. It is unnatural for the press gallery to be uncritical of a seven year old government. The Prime minister office is pouring to many resources into dirty politics and controling the media and little effort to tackle the housing crisis or poverty reduction.

The conspiracy would be more believable if they could spell Sean Plunket’s name properly. I’m surprised that they haven’t substituted every ‘s’ for a ‘$’.

scheme-560x818 Read more »

Mana and single issue nutter protests against Waihopai and GCSB

Great timing.  In an international climate where non-Islam related lone gunmen are killing fellow countrymen and women, these nutbars want to turn our eyes and ears off so we’d be blind to any potential attacks.

Around 50 protesters marched through the streets of Blenheim today, demanding the Government shut down the Waihopai spy base.

The rally is an annual event, but protestors say New Zealanders are starting to listen.

The message was loud and clear. It was the same one the anti-Waihopai protestors have been repeating since the spy base opened in 1987.

Organiser Murray Horton believes that after 27 years it’s a message that’s finally getting through.

“Everybody knows about the Five Eyes alliance, which Waihopai is part of,” says Mr Horton. “Everybody knows about the National Security Agency.” Read more »

This comment is not satire but it should be

John-Minto

John Minto

Below is a comment from John Minto, which would be satire at its finest, if it wasn’t for the fact that he actually means every word.

From the outset Mana realised there were big risks in the arrangement because of the massive wealth and polarising character of Kim Dotcom but it was a risk we were prepared to take. I’m proud of the fact we risked our parliamentary representation for something much bigger – challenging corporate wealth and power which is expressed politically through the Labour and National Parties.
-The DB

 

mega-kimble-intro-4f20382-intro-thumb-640xauto-29726

Kim Dotcom’s massive wealth was a risk John Minto was willing to take. -photo wired.com

Forgive me for my contempt, but isn’t using Kims ‘ massive wealth ‘ to challenge ‘ corporate wealth’ like, screwing for virginity?

Rodney Hide on what would have happened if Winston had been given the hacked information

Rodney Hide uses his column in the NBR to explain what would have happened if Winston Peters had gotten his hands on the documents of the illegal hacker/criminal who attacked me.

Mr Hager took the emails and made quite a story. Post-election, his claims haven’t stood up. But no matter. It was big news ahead of the election. The media loved it. Dirty Politics dominated the election campaign.

Now imagine Mr Peters with the same material. He could weave a far better story. He would make it sound truly shocking, terrible and totally corrupt. With Mr Peters it would sound believable.

By comparison, Mr Hager lacks gravitas. He was good – he convinced people he was an investigative journalist – but he’s nowhere near as good as Mr Peters.

More than that, Mr Peters had the protection and platform of Parliament. He could have said anything.

He would have been the news every night

And he would have sustained the attacks day in, day out. He would have done so for months. With that material, and that story, no matter that it wasn’t true, Mr Peters would have brought the government down. Every page of Dirty Politics would be another day’s shocking news. And when he ran out of pages he would be busy alluding to what was to come.   Read more »

Labour’s institutional dysfunction

Danyl McLauchlan is one of the few on the left wing that I can respect.

His observations when he isn’t being silly or writing bad satire are usually spot on.

He has taken the time to discuss the Labour party and what he sees as their impending collapse.

I don’t know if Labour is a dying party. Looks like to to me, but there’s still time to turn things around. I do think there’s an important difference between National in 2002 and the Labour Party in 2014. After their 2002 election loss National realised that it faced an existential crisis and took drastic action. They bought Steven Joyce in to review the party, underwent a huge reorganisation and then united behind their subsequent leaders, Brash and Key. The sense I get from Labour is that they don’t have anything to worry about because hey, National was in big trouble a few years ago and now look at them go! Sure, Labour aren’t doing great right now but it’s just history; it’s political cycles. You gotta ride it out and wait until the tide washes you back into government again. There was a nice example of this from former Labour President Mike Williams on the Nine to Noon political segment last week. Williams announced that the leader of the Labour leadership contest will probably be the Prime Minister in 2017 because four term governments are rare. Forget all that hard work of somehow beating John Key, which Labour has no idea how to do, or even reforming the party. Fate will just return them to power, somehow, because that’s what sometimes happened in the past.

I don’t think Key and National see themselves as being circumscribed by fate, and that they should just resign themselves to losing in 2017. I think they’ve built a fearsome political behemoth that dominates New Zealand’s political landscape and which they hope will endure for a long, long time, even after Key finally retires in his fifth term (or whenever).  Labour dying is not a worst-case scenario for the New Zealand left. Labour hanging around, slowly dwindling, occupying the political space of the center-left but not winning an election for another twenty years is the real and highly plausible doomsday scenario. I don’t know how much of National’s strength is an accident of Labour’s current weakness, but I do know that the new Labour leaders job will be reforming their party, and not beating Key. That’s not even an option for Labour until they somehow transform themselves into a modern professional political party, and figure out who they are and what they stand for.

Read more »