journalist

Let’s come up with some new adjectives to describe the MSM

When Cam was the Editor of a MSM newspaper the MSM still referred to him as Attack Blogger Cameron Slater or Controversial Blogger Cameron Slater or Right Wing Controversial or attack Blogger Cameron Slater. Many of the e-mails taken by the hacker were working e-mails from when he was employed as an Editor and were between him and his many contacts and sources.

After a respected High Court Judge declared Cameron a Journalist the MSM still refused to call him a journalist. When Nicky Hager used information stolen from Cameron it was not reported as a writer of a book based on a Journalist’s stolen information but as a respected Investigative Journalist reporting on a nasty attack blogger! No doubt the fact that Nicky admitted to deliberately leaving out of the book all the journalists who regularly worked with Cameron and shared information with him ensured that he got nothing but positive press about his commercial venture. After all, he protected their skins, so they had to return the favour or be tarred with the Dirty Politics brush.

No doubt when Freed starts giving the MSM a good old fashioned thrashing, pants down they will still refer to him as a Blogger using one of the above adjectives.

No doubt even as they are forced to lay off journalists and tighten their collective belts while giving away even more copies of their outdated and behind the times product they will continue to get a sense of satisfaction from their adjectives.

Well I say why should they have all the fun?

Time to start a collection of adjectives of our own.

                                                          Dead tree media

Dead tree media

Dead tree media

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A timely tune up for NZ media

This story is a timely tune up for NZ media.

It is not ok to hack phones but journos think it’s ok to reproduce stories off hacks in NZ, and worse still a hack against another journalist.

A former journalist with British tabloid the Sunday Mirror has pleaded guilty to hacking into voicemails in pursuit of an exclusive story.

Graham Johnson admitted guilt Thursday and will be sentenced Nov. 27. The 46-year-old had turned himself in to police after learning of the arrest of colleagues on similar charges.

Johnson said he was taught how to hack into voicemails by a supervisor and had used the technique in 2001 while investigating a possible affair between a soap opera actress and a gangster. He told the court he didn’t know the hacking was illegal when he did it.

District Judge Quentin Purdy praised Johnson for confessing his crime.

Britain’s long-running phone hacking scandal has led to the closure of the News of the World tabloid and numerous arrests.

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Corporates build their own newsrooms, feed the corporate media

Andrew Sullivan is a little despondent in his post about corporate newsrooms.

He suggests that sponsored articles or native advertising will win:

Because journalists will make far more money from it than the old, ethical variety. Because no one has come up with a business model that can compete with it for moolah. And, above all, because readers don’t really give a shit:

The article he quotes next is an interesting one, where Columbia Journalism Review looks at corporate newsrooms.

Not ones built by corporate media, but rather ones built be corporates to write their own content to feed to a lazy media.

By next year, Coca-Cola hopes to have killed the press release. It believes the corporate website is dead, and it’s shifting its money away from television advertising. It has little use for journalists who aren’t interested in stories Coke wants to tell. Instead, it’s decided that producing its own content is better than relying on others.

To that end, Coke—and Nestlé and Chipotle and Volkswagen and countless other companies—have blown up their marketing departments in recent years. They’ve infused them with something that looks closer to a newsroom, producing glossy magazines, blog networks, reported articles, long-form narratives, and compelling videos. One Volkswagen video alone, filmed in a Hong Kong movie theater, has drawn almost 29 million viewers on YouTube, proof that you don’t have to work in a newsroom to understand the dynamics of social media. Or check out a site produced by Red Bull on surfing: It’s filled with spectacular photography, short documentaries, the latest news on surfing, and very little about Red Bull energy drinks.

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Face of the day

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Afghanistan’s cosmopolitan new first lady, Rula Ghani (pictured), has backed France’s controversial ban on the niqab

Rula Ghani is one amazing lady. She is a Christian in a Muslim Country and she is standing up for women’s rights. She couldn’t do it without the support of her husband and fortunately for her she has it.

France’s niqab ban is PRAISED by Afghanistan’s new First Lady as she begins campaigning for women’s rights in the country
Rula Ghani said the niqab and burqa prevent women from moving freely

Afghanistan’s cosmopolitan new first lady has backed France’s controversial ban on the niqab, comparing the full veil to ‘blinders’ as she prepares to campaign for more respect for women in her conservative adopted homeland.

Rula Ghani shocked Afghan observers earlier this year when she appeared with her husband during the country’s presidential campaign, a rare example of a political wife sharing the spotlight.

Now the Lebanese-American of Christian heritage is set to carve out a role for herself as the patriarchal and deeply Muslim nation’s first high-profile first lady.

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Wearing the full veil in public was banned by French law in 2011

In an interview with AFP at the presidential palace, Ghani, who speaks five languages, reminisced about her time as a student at the prestigious Sciences Po university in Paris which she attended during the late 1960s.
Wearing a vintage Hermes scarf over her hair, she recalled in fluent French that ‘all the young women at Sciences Po had their headscarves which they would wear as they stepped out of school’.

‘When issues began to arise around the veil and hijab in France, I was a little shocked, people seem to not have a very long memory.’

Wearing the full veil in public was banned by French law in 2011, igniting a fierce debate over the value of religious freedom against social cohesion.

Ghani said she supported the ban.

‘Regarding the French law against the niqab and burqa which prevent women from being able to move freely and see, because the niqab is a bit like blinders, I am in full agreement with the government of France,’ Ghani told AFP.
The banning of the rull veil in France ignited a fierce debate over the value of religious freedom against social cohesion

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Et Tu Fisher?

“Et tu, Brute?” (pronounced [ɛt ˈtuː ˈbruːtɛ]) is a Latin phrase meaning “and you, Brutus?” or “and you, too, Brutus?”, purportedly as the last words of the Roman dictator Julius Caesar to his friend Marcus Brutus at the moment of his assassination. The quotation is widely used in Western culture to signify the utmost betrayal by an unexpected person, such as a friend.

-Wiki

070-james-mason-theredlist

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Face of the day

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“You are never free” – Nicolas Henin shared a cell with all four men beheaded by Isis. Photo / ITV / Screengrab

Imagine being held hostage and never knowing if the next day will be your last. Imagine forming close friendships with the other hostages and watching them one by one taken away to be murdered. Nicolas Henin experienced all that and I understand why he feels that he isn’t free of the horrors of his captivity even though he was released. Psychologically the stress would be unimaginable. There may be survivors guilt. He may ask himself why was I spared and my friends were not? He still has to watch on T.V and in the news the new brutal murders as they happen. I truly feel for him and hope that this experience will not destroy him but will make him determined to ensure that the Media report the reality of his experience.

A freed Islamic State (Isis) hostage has revealed how he shared a cell with all four men beheaded by the militants in sickening filmed murders.

French journalist Nicholas Henin was captured by jihadists in Syria last year and spent nine months in cramped cells alongside other Westerners – including James Foley, Steven Sotloff, David Haines and Alan Henning.

Other cellmates included John Cantlie and Peter Kassig – both of whom the militants have since paraded and threatened with murder in chilling propaganda videos.

Despite being released in April, Mr Henin said he still doesn’t feel free of the horrors of his time in captivity – and the murders of his former cellmates brought back “brutal” memories.

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Face of the day

Alan Sayers

Alan Sayers-Stuff

I bumped into Alan Sayers at the supermarket yesterday. He had two bottles of white wine amongst his groceries and joked to me that I should leave his wine alone. I joked back that it was safe from me as I only drink red. He responded that in fact red wine was his preferred drink and that in fact he had a glass of it each night before bed. We continued to chat and I was very surprised to learn that he was a lot older than he looked.

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Face of the day

Glenn Greenwald

Glenn Greenwald

Henchmen

Henchmen

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Photo Of The Day

Photo/who’swho South Africa Thokozile Matilda Masipa is a former social worker turned journalist turned lawyer turned superior court judge. She’s “eloquent” and highly respected by her peers, but perpetrators should tread lightly.

Photo/who’swho South Africa
Thokozile Matilda Masipa is a former social worker turned journalist turned lawyer turned superior court judge. She’s “eloquent” and highly respected by her peers, but perpetrators should tread lightly.

Judge Thokozile Matilda Masipa

The World Awaits Her Verdict

Oscar Pistorius murder trial: The woman who already knows if the Paralympian is guilty – or not guilty Read more »

“Digitally Savvy”… Fairfax needs someone better than their existing staff

It is pretty simple stuff…to be “digitally savvy”… of course the irony of looking for a digitally savvy intern in a newspaper seems to have escaped them.  Read more »