journalist

“Digitally Savvy”… Fairfax needs someone better than their existing staff

It is pretty simple stuff…to be “digitally savvy”… of course the irony of looking for a digitally savvy intern in a newspaper seems to have escaped them.  Read more »

About that dream Nicky…

Nicky Hager

Nicky Hager

Nicky Hagar had a dream before his book was released. In the dream he was having dinner at our house and was talking in the kitchen with Cameron and I. He said he then realised that he was writing a book about Cameron and felt really bad because here he was having dinner with us and having a pleasant conversation despite our political differences.
He used this story during his book launch to make the point that he does not ‘ demonise ‘ people and that this is not a personal attack against Cameron.

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Face of the day

Steve Braunias 2

Steven Braunias is all class. Cam met him at the awards. He asked if Cam was offended by the wickedly funny piece he did on him back When Cam was Editor of Truth.

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Compare and Contrast: Part three

Welcome to part three of my series of posts where I invite you to compare and contrast what happened in the past with what is happening now.

Lets look at how Germany kept its preparations for war hidden from the world prior to WWII and what Hamas has successfully hidden from the world until now.

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Hamas threatening journalists, I wonder what Rachel Smalley thinks about that

Rachel Smalley has declared she is a Hamas hugger, she claims she is a “serious journalist” and yet she remains silent on the threatening of journalists by Hamas to only show Hamas in a positive light.

Evidence is emerging now of significant intimidation of journalists in Gaza by Hamas.

I note there is no such intimidation by the IDF or Israeli authorities.

Radjaa Abu Dagga, Gaza correspondent for France’sLibération, told the newspaper‘s readers on Tuesday how Hamas refused his requests to leave Gaza and how he was interrogated by Hamas members from their headquarters inside Gaza’s Al-Shifa hospital, a violation of international rules of war.

Blogger Elder of Ziyon published a translation of his harrowing account on Thursday.

Correspondent Radjaa Abu Dagga for years divided his time between Paris, where his wife and son live, and Gaza, where his parents live and where he works. On 18 June, when he wanted to cross the Rafah border, an officer banned his way and took his passport like all Palestinians trying to cross into Egypt that day.

After four blocked attempts to leave Gaza without explanation over weeks, the Palestinian journalist was summoned by the security services of Hamas on Sunday. ‘I received a call from a private number. They summoned me to Al-Shifa Hospital in the Gaza City center,’ explains Radjaa. He carried with him his two phones, his press card and a small camera.

A few meters from the emergency room where the injured from bombings are constantly flowing, in the outpatient department, he was received in ‘a small section of the hospital used as administration’ by a band of young fighters. They were all well dressed, which surprised Radjaa, ‘in civilian clothing with a gun under one’s shirt and some had walkie-talkies.’  He was ordered to empty his pockets, removing his shoes and his belt then was taken to a hospital room ‘which served that day as the command office of three people.’    Read more »

Take a bow Allan Dick, journalist

Alan Dick  Photo/Facebook

Allan Dick
Photo/Facebook

This is a man I probably oppose in his political views, but a man I can respect for what he has written yesterday.

Allan Dick wrote this on his Facebook page yesterday.

I have an admission to make. It will forever brand me but this is too important.

All my public life as a journalist and broadcaster I have kept my political persuasions private.

I believe in free enterprise and the rights of the individual to make his or her own way in life. I despise social bludgers and those who will legislate for the weakest links in the chain.

But I am also a socialist and believes in support for those who aren’t as self=supporting as I think I am. I have voted Labour all but once in my life when I voted Social Credit. 

Today though, I am regretting it. I have read the pure evil and the hatred that’s been directed at John Banks and I am ashamed to be from the same political camp as those making these comments.  Read more »

Compare and contrast

It is interesting to compare articles by different media on the same topic.

A case in point was yesterday when they were reporting on Cam in the High Court.

First up lets check out the headlines.

Blogger wants journalists’ privileges
-Stuff.co.nz -

Blogger argues for media protection
-New Zealand Herald

Whale Oil flaunts Canon award as evidence he is a journalist
-National Business Review

Journalist/Blogger complex debated today
-Newstalk ZB

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Face of the day

He wants to set the record straight.

He wants to set the record straight.

Horan: our side of the story

MP Brendan Horan has cut a lonely figure since his sacking from the NZ First caucus amid allegations he took money from his late mother’s bank account. Today, he and his wife, Miranda, tell David Fisher how the crisis has affected them and why they plan to fight back

- NZ Herald

Politics is a tough arena. It is not for the faint hearted and it is particularly hard on spouses who often get caught in the cross fire.

I can understand his wife Miranda wanting to try to set the record straight but it is foolish of them both to try to do so.

You need to get to a place where you do not care what other people think if you are to survive the Political world. Journalists like David Fisher are not your friend. They are not there to help.    Read more »

du Fresne again on sneaky journalists

Karl du Fresne has another post about sneaky journalists and bias.

This one too is worth a read, but the conclusion is most interesting,

… I struggle to accept that being a political journalist necessarily requires you to neuter yourself as a citizen.

The crucial issue, surely, is how you do the job. Journalists should be judged on the fairness and impartiality of their reporting and commentary. It’s possible to be a party member and still be even-handed as a journalist. And since a journalist’s work is, by definition, highly visible, it’s relatively easy for the public and the employer to judge whether he or she’s doing the job honestly.

I can think of relatively high-profile journalists who hold strong left-wing views in private but still manage to do their work with integrity, as the journalists’ code of ethics requires. There are also journalists and commentators (Paul Henry and John Campbell, for example) who quite openly lean one way or the other – but since their politics are no secret, viewers can decide for themselves how much weight to place on whatever they might say.   Read more »

Brian Edwards on Shane Taurima, Linda Clark and Conflicts of Interest

My good friend Brian Edwards has this to say about Shane Taurima and his actual conflict of interest:

There was nothing terribly complex about Shane Taurima’s situation with regard to his job as Head of TVNZ’s  Maori and Pacifica Department once he had, albeit unsuccessfully,  sought the Labour Party nomination for the Rawhiti Ikaroa seat following the death of Parekura Horomia. Taurima had very publicly nailed his political colours to the mast. In doing so he had effectively disbarred himself from any further involvement in News or Current Affairs broadcasting with the state broadcaster. The potential conflict of interest could not have been more clear.

Television New Zealand apparently did not see it that way. Perhaps they thought that Taurima’s failure to actually win the nomination made all the difference. He had been a would-be Labour candidate, not an actual Labour candidate.  (And, as it turned out, would be again.) That rationalisation is so facile as to be laughable. Taurima was politically tainted. He should not have been re-employed in his previous role. But he was.

When he took things even further and  turned his TVNZ office into a Maori/Pacifica Labour Party branch, Taurima did his employer a favour.  Without actually hanging portraits of Savage, Fraser and Kirk on the walls, the conflict of interest in which he and others in his department now found themselves could not have been more patent. To his credit, Taurima had the grace and good sense to resign.

He resigned because the case was so clear cut there was no other option. Unfortunately for Shane Taurima he thought Labour would stand by their electorate chair, instead they have given him the cold-face and turned their back.

There is actually nothing new about all of this. The list of television and radio  broadcasters working in news and current affairs who are or have been simultaneously engaged in activities which conflict with their obligation to be and be seen to be utterly impartial in all matters relating to their jobs, is extremely long. They may well be in the majority. Conflicts of interest among such practitioners abound.

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