Kelvin Davis

“All steam and no hangi”

Kelvin Davis understand politics.  No sympathy.

New Te Tai Tokerau MP Kelvin Davis has dubbed Internet-Mana “all steam and no hangi” after it failed to deliver on the hype on election day.

Leader Hone Harawira was ousted and Internet-Mana polled just 1.26 per cent, in spite of internet entrepreneur Kim Dotcom’s hefty financial backing, last week’s Moment of Truth and a highly publicised national road show to try and drum up support.

“There was a lot of promises, a lot of hope and excitement but it was all steam and no hangi,” Davis said of Internet-Mana.

It was a case of fourth time lucky for Davis who reversed Harawira’s 2011 majority of more than 1100 votes.

Watching the votes come in had been an emotional experience, he said.

“I was ready to go home at about 7.30, he was 300 [votes] ahead of me and I thought ‘Oh shit here we go again’… and then someone said you’re down to 290 and you go ‘Oh okay, it must’ve been the local town I live in’s booth coming in’ and then the next one was down to 260 or something and then it just started dropping and everyone got bloody excited.

‘‘ Then they said ‘Kelvin, you’re ahead’ and then the gap kept going for me.

“It was good to watch I have to say. It was exciting.”

At WO HQ we were watching the TTT result real time and graphing it as we went.  All the early votes went to Hone.  Al the votes from the 20th went to Kelvin.    Read more »

Labour’s Tony Milne Problem

The Labour Party has a really big problem.

It keeps selecting candidates that cannot win, even in seats that they should win.

The best example of this is Tony Milne in Christchurch Central.

Milne did the hard yards over the years, made all the right connections and was very, very close to former MP Tim Barnett.

The problem is that to win you actually need to be electable.

Milne was never electable. Unfortunately for Tony he has absolutely no presence. He is a midget that wears massive dark framed glasses and walks into a room and nobody notices him.

Check out Tony’s campaign video.

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Kelvin Davis’ Win In Te Tai Tokerau

As many readers will know a fair few people on the right wanted Kelvin Davis to win Te Tai Tokerau.

David Farrar and I even publicly donated money tot eh cause.

Kelvin is a good bloke, and from the right or sensible or non-gaggle or self serving wing of the Labour Party, and him winning was good for New Zealand politics.

The problem for Kelvin was that Labour kept tanking all our support.

Mathew Hooton wanted to organise a fundraiser for him. David Cunliffe and Tim Barnett said no. Others wanted to make some big donations to his campaign. Cunliffe and Barnett said no. They would have rather lost than let Kelvin receive support from people who weren’t died in the wool Labour supporters.    Read more »

Labour’s Leadership Problem

Cunliffe - Sh_t

Labour had a shocker of a campaign, which all started when they didn’t do any proper polling or focus groups on their leadership contenders last year.

Arts, Travel and Lifestyle Blogger David Farrar interrupted his hectic world travel schedule to do the kind of research Labour needed to do on Cunliffe last year and was consistently saying he had very high negatives and he would tank Labour’s vote.

For Labour to be relevant again they need to start by doing the kind of research our pinko mate did and find out who can actually connect with Middle New Zealand.

Cunliffe has proven he can’t.

Robertson has similar negatives, so it might be time for Labour to look at someone that actually can reach out to middle New Zealand.

 

Grant Robertson can’t lay claim to the leadership. He massively lost the party vote on the night in his electorate…coming a distant third.  Read more »

$4,500,000 (declared) gets you NOTHING

Money doesn’t buy you elections.   Colin Craig knows it, and now too, does Kim Dotcom.    Read more »

Poor Hone. Sold his soul to Dotdevil. Regrets… oh yeah

any likeness to people being discussed is a remarkable conincidence, yet this is not photoshopped.  perhaps these are their doppelgangers?  (oddly enough, a German word)

any likeness to people being discussed is a remarkable conincidence, yet this is not photoshopped. perhaps these are their doppelgangers? (oddly enough, a German word)

Mana leader Hone Harawira claims the National, Labour and Maori parties are all out to unseat him by throwing their weight behind Labour’s Kelvin Davis, leaving him fighting for his political life with only two campaigning days left.

Well, he’s got that right.   No need to claim anything, it’s true.   Read more »

Just 1% in it, Maori party supporters need to vote for Kelvin Davis

Maori Television has a shock poll in Te Tai Tokerau, showing that Kelvin Davis is within 1% of tipping over Hone Harawira.

A major upset could be ahead for Hone Harawira in the Māori electorate of Te Tai Tokerau, given the close battle between him and Kelvin Davis according to our Māori Television poll results.

Hone Harawira is still leading the electorate on 38%.  However Kelvin Davis is on 37%, so there is just 1% between them.

No doubt, Hone Harawira’s knees will be shaking from those numbers and so too will Internet-MANA.    Read more »

Kelvin Davis is getting the word out

One of our readers took a bit of a Tiki Tour through Te Tai Tokerau and was pleased to discover a lot of Kelvin Davis signs:

trtyew

With all the distractions surrounding Dirty Politics, we all have kind of taken our eyes off Te Tai Tokerau, the “life or death” electorate for the Internet Mana “movement”.

If Hone Harawira doesn’t make it back as a sitting MP, their dreams all fall apart.

I still can’t figure out why he hasn’t declared the $500,000 he got from Kim Dotcom on the registry of pecuniary interests?  He has to within 10 days.

I might look into that some more.  Something’s not right.

Hooton on Labour’s Next Leader

Matthew Hooton has written an article in the NBR talking about who could be the next Labour leader.

He speaks of centrist candidates Stu Nash and Kel Davis as potential leaders if they can win their seats.

Depending on how their electorate races go, two names would emerge: Labour’s candidates in Te Tai Tokerau and Napier, Kelvin Davis and Stuart Nash.

Both live and breath Labour values but are reasonably centralist, in the John Key mode.  Both have played for the parliamentary rugby team, drink beer out of the bottle, are married to women and have kids.

If Mr Davis makes it back to parliament, he will have defeated the formidable Hone Harawira and kept Ms Harre, Ms Sykes and Mr Minto out.  By working hard at the local level over two elections, Mr Nash will have overturned National’s massive 9108 majority from 2008.  Both will have done it by getting National voters to tick red.

In Mr Davis’ case, he would become the first Maori leader of a major political party.  For Mr Nash, he would be seeking election as prime minister in 2017, exactly 60 years after the last Nash, his grandfather Walter, took Labour to power.  Moreover, in Labour’s centenary year, the grandson of Michael Joseph Savage’s finance minister would be leading the party towards power.  If they worked together, a Nash/Davis ticket would be a dream team.

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Checkers players versus Chess players in politics

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Phil Quin notes that there appear to be many in side Labour who are playing political chess when they are more suited to playing checkers.

Leaked revelations of a dispute between Labour’s Te Tai Tokerau candidate Kelvin Davis and the party’s Head Office over a proposed negative campaign against Hone Harawira and Kim Dotcom have been used as evidence of Davis going rogue.  In truth, the documents show a candidate engaged in nothing more sinister than garden variety electioneering; of trying to win a tough political fight. The tone of the news coverage appears to align with the political objectives of whoever furnished the leaks to begin with: to shut Davis up, and and his campaign operation down.

A more intriguing, as well as troubling, aspect of the leaked emails from Labour’s General Secretary Tim Barnett suggests someone is telling porkies about the party’s Maori seat strategy, not to mention understating its eagerness to figuratively wade in Kim Dotcom’s pool.

In sharp contrast to comments David Cunliffe made as recently as last Tuesday, Barnett prohibits the Labour campaign in Te Tai Tokerau from campaigning against the Internet Mana Party which he casts as a “progressive” ally.  Cunliffe, meanwhile, repeatedly told Radio Live’s Duncan Garner that Labour was “absolutely not” doing a deal with the Internet Mana Party, and that “we are backing Kelvin Davis to win in the North.”  And yet we now know, just a few weeks earlier, Secretary Barnett was telling the Davis campaign team to refrain from “picking fights” with Harawira and Dotcom.  There shouldn’t be any doubt about what Barnett is advocating here: since ‘picking fights’ with opponents is the very stuff of elections, Barnett is effectively instructing Davis to ‘run dead’ rather than actually campaign to win in Te Tai Tokerau.

At best, this suggests Mr Barnett does not stand by his leader’s oft-repeated mantra that Labour intends to contest all seven Maori seats, including Te Tai Tokerau.  At worst, it calls into question whether any such strategy ever existed.

We are witnessing yet more attempts at three dimensional chess by people far better suited to checkers.

Read more »