Kelvin Davis

Winston and Kelvin Davis need to get their facts straight

Yesterday in parliament Winston Peters and Kelvin Davis led a shameless and more to the point dead wrong attack against a local company in Northland.

They are trying to link Judith Collins into the attack and Nick Smith didn’t really help her with his hesitant responses.

Kelvin Davis : Has he discussed the issue of swamp kauri exports with Judith Collins, whose husband, David Wong-Tung, and good friend Stone Shi are directors in the chain of shell companies that owns the Ruakākā mill, the ultimate ownership of which is obscured by a lawyer’s nominee company?

Mr SPEAKER : In so far as there may be some ministerial responsibility.

Hon Dr NICK SMITH : I thought that this member was above getting involved in that sort of murk.

Kelvin Davis : I raise a point of order, Mr Speaker. I did ask a question, and it was not addressed.

Mr SPEAKER : Yes, and I said that the Minister could answer it in so far as there was ministerial responsibility. There was very little connection there with ministerial responsibility. I allowed the Minister to answer it the way he did, and that is acceptable.

Rt Hon Winston Peters : Is he denying what is well known to locals in Northland: that swamp kauri is being exported illegally and that his ministry’s lax enforcement of the law is because people high up in Oravida are major donors and players in the National Party, and there are the photographs of the logs, all being exported illegally?

Mr SPEAKER : Again, I will invite the Minister to answer if he sees ministerial responsibility.

Hon Dr NICK SMITH : The law in respect of the export of indigenous forests was passed in 1993, with that member’s support. It was softened in 2004 by colleagues adjacent to him, with his support. My advice is that the law is being followed.

Rt Hon Winston Peters : I raise a point of order, Mr Speaker. He cannot get up and accuse me of supporting a law when I was not a member of the Government. He did it on both occasions—1993 and 1994. We all know that. He is just telling lies.

Mr SPEAKER : Order! [Interruption] No, I do not need further help with that. That is certainly not a point of order. I will invite the Minister, if he wishes, to add further to his answer in order to complete it before we go to further supplementary questions.

Hon Dr NICK SMITH : I would invite the member to check the Hansard as to how New Zealand First voted in 1993 on the Forests Amendment Act, and, again, as to how the party voted in 2004 when the law was changed.

They are running off their mouths under the protection of parliamentary privilege.    Read more »

Coffey gets it in the arse

The tipline ran hot yesterday with some interesting news that is causing a fair bit of angst in Labour circles.

The word has been quietly put about that Labour’s new (Maori) comms person has been appointed.

Putting Māori Members of Parliament (MPs) at the forefront of important New Zealand politics is Jodi Ihaka’s plan, as she was recently appointed the Labour Party’s new Senior Communications Advisor (Māori).

“I’m really excited to use my communication skills in such an important Māori advisory capacity.  I have loved my time at Whakaata Māori (Māori Television) and have nothing but respect for the Māori journalists on Te Kāea and Native Affairs,” says Ihaka.

The position sees Ihaka take on a key advisory role to Labour leader, Andrew Little as well as Māori MPs including Kelvin Davis, Peeni Henare, Louisa Wall, Meka Whaitiri, Nanaia Mahuta and Adrian Rurawhe.

However not without some squealing and some anger.  Read more »

Winston is not a details man

Winston Peters has launched his Northland by-election campaign by telling voters he’s offering them “a chance in a lifetime”.

The NZ First leader’s message at a street corner meeting was that if they back him he’ll be a strong advocate for a region that’s been neglected by successive governments.

“Northland ranks very high on social deprivation that that’s an absolute indictment of National’s woeful treatment of this region,” he told a street corner crowd in Wellsford today.

Mr Peters says that between now and March 28 he’ll cover the electorate from top to bottom in his “Force for the North” campaign bus.

The seat is vacant because National’s Mike Sabin resigned last month, citing personal reasons.

It’s been a safe National seat for decades but Mr Peters says he can win it by focusing on the way the region has been neglected.

And he’s targeting National voters by pointing out the government won’t change if he takes the seat, while the region will benefit from the strong message he’ll take to Wellington.
Mr Peters is up against candidates from National, Labour and ACT, as well as a handful of independents and four representing parties that aren’t in parliament.

He’s already up there with his big bus.  Just a small problem.   Read more »

Even Rudman understands why Labour shouldn’t run in Northland

It seems everyone except Andrew Little understands why Labour shouldn’t have run in Northland.

Brian Rudman lays off bludging for a new theatre to point this out.

On National Radio yesterday, Labour leader Andrew Little was talking up his candidate’s chances, and questioning Mr Peters’ electoral appeal. In his position, it was the only thing he could do. He said Ms Prime “has a profile and understanding you might not see sitting in Wellington or Auckland”.

Rather desperately he added that “Labour has always struggled to get good numbers there” but “circumstances may well have changed and [she] may well be in with a chance”.That seems highly unlikely. Since the seat was created in 1996 it has been solidly National. At last September’s general election, National’s Mike Sabin, whose sudden resignation for undisclosed personal reasons triggered the present contest, scored 18,269 votes to Ms Prime’s 8969. The party vote gap was even wider, National on 17,412, Labour, 5913. New Zealand First, with no candidate, was close to Labour on 4546.

Then there is the strategic implications of placating Winston and changing the dynamics of parliament.

He says Mr Peters endorsed Kelvin Davis, Labour’s winning candidate, in the Maori seat of Te Tai Tokerau last election and now Labour should return the favour. He reckons the New Zealand First leader, who has family connections in the North, is the only person who, “on a good day”, could win the safe seat off National and create all sorts of turmoil for the Government.   Read more »

Treaty Ground owners making good tourism coin

Waitangi Treaty House

The media are selling it as a disaster – a drop in visitor numbers willing to pay:

A drop in the number of Kiwis visiting the historic Waitangi Treaty Grounds has sparked more debate on whether people should have to pay.

While it’s free on Waitangi Day, which saw 30,000 people flock to the grounds, a charge introduced last year means during all other times Kiwis have to pay $15 and overseas visitors $25.

Since then, the number of domestic visitors has dropped by more than five per cent.

Five percent.  So 5% down on when it was free.  95% of the people pay anyway?  Good grief, it’s a money spinner.    Read more »

Guess who won Massey University’s Quote of the Year competition?

Massey University held its usual Quote of the Year competition recently, and one of my quotes from the election campaign and Dirty Politics was a finalist.

The finalist quotes were:

I’m sorry for being a man. (David Cunliffe’s unusual apology at Labour’s domestic violence policy launch at a Women’s Refuge forum)

We think it’s, um, pretty legal. (Steven Joyce asked by reporters about the use of a song for the National election campaign that sounded very similar to one by Eminen)

You work in news you puffed up little shit!…When will you glove puppets of Cameron Slater just piss off? (Internet Party press secretary Pam Corkery at a campaign event, when the media kept asking for an interview with Kim Dotcom)

It was all steam and no hangi. (Te Tai Tokerau MP Kelvin Davis describing Internet-Mana after it failed to deliver on the hype on election day)

He could probably survive shooting little kittens in his garden with a shotgun. (Kim Dotcom on how little impact Dirty Politics had on Prime Minister John Key’s approval ratings.

I play politics like Fijians play rugby. My role is smashing your face into the ground. (Whale Oil blogger Cameron Slater after Nicky Hager’s book Dirty Politics was released)

I did not have textual relations with that blogger. (Spoof of John Key’s initial denial that he had received texts from Whale Oil blogger Cameron Slater tweeted by Lloyd Burr of RadioLive)

It terrifies me how much of our economy is stuck inside a dairy cow. (Comedian Te Radar talking to farmers at Fieldays)

Get past the breath-taking PR snow job. (Former CERA communications adviser Tina Nixon describing the press conference to announce the resignation of chief executive Roger Sutton after a sexual harassment complaint)

No more beersies for you. (Tagline in this year’s Health Promotion Agency advertising campaign to reduce harmful alcohol consumption.)

Guess which quote has won.   Read more »

Garner’s winners and losers

Duncan Garner has published his list of winners and losers for 2014.

I will be talking with Garner at 1545  about this on Radio Live.

My political winners and losers of the year.

WINNERS

1. JOHN KEY

For all the obvious reasons. He is still the PM and he is still widely popular according to the polls. He had the kitchen sink thrown at him and he almost won the election outright. He’ll have to watch it doesn’t go to his head.

2. ANDREW LITTLE

Couldn’t win a fight in a kindergarten but ends the year on top. His caucus didn’t want him, his party didn’t want him, his electorate didn’t want him. Yet he ends the year looking strong and competent as Labour’s new leader.

3. KELVIN DAVIS

He beat Hone Harawira and therefore beat Kim Dotcom – do I have to say anymore?

4. SUE BRADFORD

She knew Dotcom and Harawira were in an unholy alliance and she put her principles before it all. She called it right – she has values and principles that are beyond reproach whether you agree with her politics or not.

5. CAM SLATER – WHALEOIL.

Yes he’s a dirt-bag, muck-raking, scum-bag attack blogger, but he likes it that way. He doesn’t play by any rule book yet he’s been judged a journalist by the courts. Despite having his dirty laundry aired for the world to see he remains talked about, his blog gets more hits than ever, he breaks stories and the PM returns his texts. Oh and he wins mainstream media awards.

Read more »

Hone Harawira still drinking German Kool-Aid

Deluded and political retards is the only description that suits the Mana party.

After losing an election, their only MP and everything else after their association with the Kaiser of Coatesville, they are now contemplating going again with the toxic German, though i’m not sure how in 2017 he will help them from a 6×9 cell in Leavenworth.

The Mana Movement is planning for the 2017 election and Kim Dotcom could be involved, leader Hone Harawira says.

Mr Harawira lost his Te Tai Tokerau seat to Labour’s Kelvin Davis and Mana’s alliance with the Dotcom backed Internet Party only gained 1.26 per cent of the party vote in September’s election.

Mr Harawira said people from across the country had attended a Mana planning meeting during the weekend.

“People are keen,” he told TVNZ’s Marae programme.

“They really want to go hard for 2017, but right now it’s about identifying key dates, key activities and being involved in things like community events wherever we are so that Mana maintains its relevance to the people.”    Read more »

Three years or six? Or more?

Tim Watkin has an interesting post at Pundit about the task ahead for Labour’s new leader.

He wonders whether or not they have a three year project or a six year project in front of them.

Whoever wins, Labour won’t be a charismatic party that voters will turn to as an exciting alternative to National. Instead, whoever wins will have to win back voters’ trust through being dependable, decent and speaking to the interests of the many.

‘Decent’ recalls Jim Bolger’s ‘decent society’ slogan, and Bolger would be a pretty good role model for any winner. Not a flamboyant or visionary politician, but one who knew how to win elections.

So who to vote for? For me Labour Party members will need to start by asking themselves this question: Can Labour win in 2017?

Essentially, is this a three year or six year project? Is one of those four the next Labour Prime Minister? Because that answer suggests different people.

Read more »

Te Tai Tokerau won out West not in North

Hone Harawira sold out his principles and his party, and if that wasn’t enough he concentrated his campaign up north.

But new figures reveal that he should have looked to West Auckland to secure his votes.

Auckland voters played a big role in kicking Mana leader Hone Harawira out of Parliament, new statistics show.

The newly published Electoral Commission data revealed that Labour’s Kelvin Davis heavily defeated Mr Harawira in polling booths in Kelston, North Shore, Te Atatu and other Auckland spots.

In all, Mr Davis claimed 711 more votes than Mr Harawira in the Auckland polling booths, giving him a huge boost in the marginal seat.

His overall majority in the Te Tai Tokerau electorate was 743 votes.

Mr Harawira was not only beaten in Auckland but on his home turf in Northland.    Read more »