Kevin Rudd

Who should we blame for Islamic Terror coming to our shores?

Andrew Bolt says it is the politicians fault, more specifically those politicians who were responsible “through years of reckless immigration and refugee policies.

I ACCUSE Australia’s political class of a crime. Of wilfully ­endangering the safety of ­Australians.

They — with much media help — have put Australians in danger through years of reckless immigration and refugee policies.

And it’s come to what we saw on Saturday — anti-terrorism police in Melbourne ­arresting five more young men from Muslim families, two for allegedly plotting attacks on police on Anzac Day.

These men were allegedly associates of Numan Haider, an Afghan refugee and Islamic State supporter who last year stabbed two Victorian policemen before being shot dead.

Police have been typically coy about identifying exactly which “community” the five were from, refusing in two press conferences on Saturday to even mention the words “Islam” or “Muslim”.

But their use of the word “community” made clear they meant something other than the Australian one.

The fact is we have imported people from “communities” so at odds with our own that a minority of members has declared war on our institutions, our police and even — allegedly — Anzac Day, the most potent symbol of our nationhood.

We are going to have the same problem here in New Zealand, with years of the Clark administration pandering to Islamic refugees.

[T]he hard facts remain. Of the 21 Australians jailed for terrorism offences so far this century, all were Muslim. Most were born overseas. Most of the rest are children of immigrants from Muslim countries.

Add the following: some 150 Australian Muslims have enlisted with barbaric terrorist groups of the Middle East, ­notably Islamic State.

Another 100 Australians thought likely to join them have had their passports confiscated, and some 200 have been pulled off planes.

Meanwhile ASIO is investigating 400 other cases involving Islamist threats.

This is an astonishing harvest of danger from a Muslim community here of fewer than 500,000 people.

Compare: we have more than 400,000 Buddhists, yet not one Buddhist has been convicted here of terrorism ­offences or shot a hostage in a Sydney cafe in the name of their faith.

There is undeniably something different about Islam, or at least the way many interpret it.

New Zealand needs to halt Islamic immigration, and possibly seek to reverse it.

So who is to blame for this problem in Australia? Bolt blames liberal elites.

[W]ith the dangers now so obvious, it’s time to call out those who so blindly exposed us to them.

There is Malcolm Fraser, the Liberal prime minister who ignored official warnings in 1976 that many refugees he was taking in from the Lebanese civil war were unskilled, illiterate and “of questionable character’’, meaning ‘’the conflicts, tensions and divisions within Lebanon will be transferred to Australia’’. Too true.

There’s Paul Keating, who, before becoming another high-immigration prime minister, overturned the Hawke government’s decision to deny permanent residency to Grand Mufti Taj Din al-Hilali, a hate preacher who went on to call the September 11 terror attacks “God’s work against oppressors”.

There’s Kevin Rudd, who as prime minister scrapped our tough border laws, opening the doors to 50,000 illegal boat people.

There is Rudd again, who, when warned by Liberal MP Wilson Tuckey that among the many peaceful boat people could be a terrorist or two, damned Tuckey to media applause for “divisive and disgusting remarks”.

There’s current Labor leader Bill Shorten, who still opposes the Abbott Government’s successful border policies and last year suggested we repeat Fraser’s mistake in response to wars in Iraq and Syria: “Perhaps it’s time to discuss do we take more refugees from these countries.”

And there’s even Prime Minister Tony Abbott. Yes, Abbott has stopped the boats, but even he still pandered to radical Muslim “representatives” he should have shunned, for instance consulting the Islamic Friendship Association’s Keysar Trad, described by the NSW Supreme Court as a “dangerous and disgraceful individual” who “incites people to commit acts of violence”.

Even Abbott cops it. And then the media…

Disturbingly, much of the media has gone alone with this great denial.

SBS notoriously refused to screen video it shot just days before the September 11 ­attacks which showed our Mufti Hilali praising suicide bombers as “heroes”.

And “human rights” lawyer and writer Julian Burnside this year claimed “the Islamophobia stirred up by Abbott and Bolt is a bigger threat to us than terrorism”.

This denial most stop.

Our refugee intake must be stricter, taking fewer people from cultures likely to clash with our own.

And we must be slower to shut down debates with screams of “racist”.

If you fear racists, then fear the ugly fallout if police one day fail to stop an Anzac Day plot by people that more prudent politicians would have kept out.

Our politicians are pretty squeamish, they need to remember that they are there to represent us, not pander to offshore moaners.

 

– Andrew Bolt, Herald Sun

 

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What a shame, I’d have supported him

Apparently there was a massive rumour going around that Kevin Rudd was going to stand for the position of Secretary-General of the United Nations…against Helen Clark.

But…

Rife speculation that Kevin Rudd would stand against Helen Clark for the spot of United Nations Secretary General has been called to a halt by his office.

It was reported Mr Rudd was campaigning for the post of United Nations Secretary-General, but his office today poured cold water on it in a statement.

“The answer now, as it has previously been, is that Mr Rudd is not a candidate,” a spokesperson said.

“Mr Rudd has made his position clear about the position of UNSG (United Nations secretary-general) numerous times.”

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An evening with Julia Gillard

I went to listen to Julia Gillard last night with Mum. It was enjoyable. Mum like me is a conservative but she appreciates women in positions of power and what we can learn from them. I didn’t agree with Julia’s position on ‘Affirmative action’ to get women into politics. Affirmative action whether applied to race or sex is reverse discrimination in my opinion and my Mum agrees.

My Mother heads a very large business and she built it from the ground up. She earned the respect she now commands and nothing was handed to her on a platter. We both find the idea of ‘ giving ‘ women a quota disrespectful to women’s abilities. As far as I know Julia Gillard got to the top job on merit yet she doesn’t expect other women to achieve what she achieved in the same way.To be fair I think her real problem was the number of women currently in Politics. She reasoned that if only a few are in it then that reduces the chances of a leader being a woman. Sure it does but it also ensures that when women like her and Helen Clark do make the top job,they will be more than equipped to handle it. As she said last night, Politics is an adversarial environment. Julia made it very clear that she did not think as some women do, that more women in Politics would make the environment more consensual. She believes that you should fight passionately for what you believe in and she makes no apology for doing that.

That aside, Julia had plenty of pertinent things to share with the audience and some of it was very relevant to why I am so excited about Freed.

She pointed out how the Media in Australia had become Protagonists in Politics instead of interested observers reporting on the action. Julia herself described some of the ways in which she was attacked in the media and media campaigns against her.

During the evening Julia’s world famous Misogyny speech  was discussed so I just had to watch it today. It was a very well structured and argued speech. Her experience as a lawyer was obvious as she used evidence to build her case with skill. I appreciate a good speech or debate because I understand the techniques used to make it good and the skill required to deliver it effectively. When I was at primary school we had a speech competition every year at every level. My brother made his first speech at only 5 years old. I was 9 when I started at that school and I took part every year until I was 12 and won every competition. At High School I won every year bar one when I came second to a guy called Grant who went on to become a lawyer.

 

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Media brainwashing, I don’t doubt it is happening here

The Australian has a great story about media student brainwashing in Australia via university courses.

Don’t think for even a moment that this stuff isn’t already happening here.

FIRST-year media students at some of the nation’s most prestigious universities are being taught the federal government’s media policy process is “corrupt”.

The 18-year-old students are also being told repeatedly that one of the world’s biggest employers of journalists, News Corp, uses “naked political pressure” to the detriment of democracy.

The Australian obtained the first-year course material for media and communications at University of Technology Sydney and The University of Sydney to examine what students are being taught about the media industry.

Over a period of five weeks, The Australian attended some lectures on an undercover basis and obtained the audio recordings of other lectures from students.

The University of Sydney course in particular is leading students to form a critical view of News Corp.

Lecturer Dr Penny O’Donnell teaches students that News Corp newspapers’ 2013 election coverage was driven by a corporate fear of the NBN — a claim that has no factual basis and is incorrect.

She also tells students, studying to become journalists, that the federal government’s media policy process is “corrupted” because it sacrifices public interest objectives in favour of corporate interests.

“We elect governments to act on our behalf so what happens to those public interest objectives?” she asks her class. “They are typically sacrificed to a process that’s very corrupted because it listens more to large corporations than it does to ordinary people. The latest battleground where you see this playing out is over control of the internet.”

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The advent of The Ruddliffe

ruddliffe

David Cunliffe has morphed into The Ruddliffe.

Like Kevin Rudd he is tone deaf to his caucus, thoroughly disliked by the majority of the caucus and the general public and so narcissistic he believes that he alone is blameless.

His career path and ending are remarkably similar as well.  Read more »

With negatives like this forget about game changers, the game is actually all over

Cunliffe - Sh_t

Labour has claimed variously that this policy or that person will be a game changer for them.

But, if the accounts in Richard Prebble’s The Letter are anything to go by it is no use changing the game, the game is actually over already.

 John Key confessed one of New Zealand’s worst kept secrets that National is addicted to polling and polls every week.  This is how they know voters think National is going to win.  National polls show “David Cunliffe has failed to connect with voters.  In Christchurch Cunliffe is polling at minus 63 percent.  This unfavourable rating puts him behind Russell Norman and Winston Peters”.  A 63% unfavourable rating in Labour voting Christchurch means most Labour voters do not like their leader. Cunliffe has no cross party appeal. Every time he appears on TV he loses Labour votes.  In the tough minded Australian Labor Party faced with this situation with Julia Gillard the caucus held its nose and re-elected Kevin Rudd who they hated.

Those negatives are telling…in Christchurch…the red core of Labour in the South Island and David Cunliffe has worse negatives than even Gerry Brownlee.  Read more »

Kevin Rudd vs Helen Clark for the top UN job

How entertaining. Two massive megalomaniacs fighting each other out for the top global government role.

Former foreign minister Bob Carr believes the United Nations could do with a dose of Kevin Rudd’s “legendary forcefulness”.

There has been some speculation the former prime minister covets the UN secretary general gig.

The incumbent Ban Ki-moon finishes his second term in 2016.

While spruiking his memoir at a Sydney bookstore on Saturday, Mr Carr said Mr Rudd had his support.

“He would be a very strong, credible candidate,” Mr Carr said. “It would be the most natural thing in the world for him to stand.”

The race was wide open.

“I think the forcefulness Kevin showed sometimes in selling a case might be considered by some in the UN as an advantage,” Mr Carr said.

A lot of members of the UN general assembly liked Mr Rudd’s agenda and Australia’s international personality.

Hopefully they attack each others campaigns. That will be worth a big bucket of popcorn.   Read more »

Labor to refund illegal $200,000 donation

Here is a great headline, unfortunately its Labour in Aussie.

Labor to refund illegal $200,000 donation used to fund polling in Kevin Rudd’s seat of Griffith in 2013 federal election

LABOR will refund an illegal $200,000 donation that was used to fund polling in Kevin Rudd’s seat during last year’s federal election, according to a report.

The donation was allegedly paid to Labor’s Griffith branch bank account by Taiwan developer and former banker Kung Chin Yuan on September 3, The Australian reports.

Labor officials found the transaction during an audit and were advised by lawyers that it breached state electoral laws.

It is illegal in Queensland for a registered political party to receive a gift of foreign property.  Read more »

Watkins on Cunliffe

Tracy Watkins writes about David Cunliffe and asks if it is at all possible that he can turn around the sinking ship that is Labour.

You could probably have cut the air with a knife at this morning’s Labour caucus after another poll showing the party on a slide toward defeat in September’s election.

The Herald-Digipoll has Labour on 29.5 per cent which simply confirms what every other poll has been telling the party since the start of the year.

Blame National leader John Key’s extraordinary popularity, blame the surge in economic confidence and belief that the country is on the right track, blame Labour leader David Cunliffe’s stumbles over trusts and party policy, blame the carry-over of mistrust toward Cunliffe from within his own caucus, or blame the fact that there is clearly an internal struggle within Labour over direction and strategy.

What it all adds up to is a party that is yet to put up a convincing case to voters that it is ready to govern or that there is any reason for a change from National.

Can David Cunliffe turn things around?  Read more »

Labour parties are the same the world over

The headline is scarily similar to what happened here in NZ.

Labour the world over booby traps the economy of their victim countries.

When Joe Hockey was growing up and dreaming of becoming prime minister, he would not have imagined that his dream would lead him to joining a bomb disposal unit. Tomorrow, he will unveil the first bomb he must dismantle and it is almost nuclear in its capacity for destruction.

At 12.30 on Tuesday, Hockey, who has also been the stand-out thespian of the new federal parliament, will unveil the real horror, dysfunction and narcissism of Kevin Rudd’s contribution to Australian political history, disably assisted by Julia Gillard. Hockey will release the mid-year economic and fiscal outlook, known in the trade as MYEFO, which will show a budget deficit much worse than Labor led us to believe, probably close to $50 billion, debt obligations much higher than Labor led us to believe, and unfunded liabilities that are so irresponsibly crushing the government will have to walk away from many of them. The most monumental folly is the National Broadband Network, whose economic rationale was worked out on a piece of paper by Rudd. The scheme subsequently created by former communications minister Stephen Conroy would cost more than $70 billion and never recover its cost of capital. The Abbott government will have to start again.  Read more »