Kim Dotcom

The fight is getting nasty, buy more popcorn

As the nasty knife fight inside Labour gets underway we can see that David Cunliffe is still at sixes and sevens.

Last night on Campbell Live he had this to say:

David Cunliffe: The reality is National has never gone out in two terms; that it’s very rare for a government to go out on [a] % growth rate, and it’s very, very hard when you’ve got distractions like Kim Dotcom

John Campbell: The 4% growth rate was predicted. It was very much in Treasury’s books when you made that speech 12 months ago . You promised Labour you could do it. You got 24%.

DC: 24.7% … Nobody is saying this is good enough … the hundreds of thousands of New Zealanders who needed a fresh start were disappointed by it.

JC: Why didn’t they vote for you?

DC: That’s the subject of a review.

JC: Hold on a sec. You are a leader, and you are a bright man. Why didn’t they vote for you?

DC: I think at the end of the day, people wanted stability. They wanted prosperity. They saw the current government, for now, delivering that for them, and they weren’t prepared to take what they saw as some kind of risk for a change.

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The Labour review is doomed before it starts

Labour has announced a sweeping review of its election thumping, starting with its campaign strategy.

After a two day long Labour council meeting, Party President Moira Coatsworth announced terms of reference for the review including:

– a review of Labour’s 2014 General Election campaign;

– a review of Labour’s political positioning going forward, with reference to the past three General Election results; and

– recommendations for rebuilding and modernising Labour.

“Learning the lessons of this campaign and of the last few years is crucial if we’re to quickly get back to representing the hopes of New Zealanders for the future,” [Labour party president] Coatsworth said.

“Labour will listen carefully and apply the lessons thoroughly. The review will be robust and will provide clear recommendations for the way we rebuild and reconnect. After listening carefully Labour will make the changes necessary toward victory in 2017″.

A team to carry out the review will be announced within a week and the review will be mostly carried out by December.

The people on that team will be fascinating.   Will this open it all up and let in the sunlight, or is this going to be for show and essentially damage control?

In more detail:    Read more »

And the criticism still mounts…

The Nation was brutal this morning.

This is what Jim Anderton had to say about Labour’s party vote campaign strategy.

Lisa Owen: We saw Mana, Mt Albert, Christchurch there, where the party vote was seriously eroded. What do you think went wrong there on the ground? What was wrong?

Jim Anderton: Well, there’s two serious points you haven’t mentioned — one is that 13 of the Labour electorates got less than 15% of the party vote, and in the strong Labour electorates, mostly the Labour vote went down in the party vote. In truth, we had more people not on the roll or not voting than the entire vote that the National party vote got or the entire vote of all the parties opposing National. Now, that’s a very worrying trend for the first time. And the worrying thing for Labour is that this isn’t the worst result that’s ever been had. I mean, the National party had a worse result in 2002; they got 22% of the vote, but in the three years following that, they caught up and nearly beat the Labour party in 2005, and in the three years since 2011, when the result was not good for Labour, they’ve done even worse. So this is really a very major problem to face.

Lisa Owen: It took them two terms to come back, and we’ll talk more about that later, but I’m interested in what your thoughts are and why these people didn’t come out and vote. Why couldn’t they be bothered?

Jim Anderton: Well, I think the Labour party are very wise to have put a stamp on having a very careful root-and-branch review of what actually happened, and I’ll give you one example — 10 months ago, a young Cook Island girl, if she wouldn’t mind me calling her a girl, probably woman, from Auckland came to Christchurch and thrashed the National party in Christchurch East, thrashed. They got a hiding to nothing. And over 60% of the vote; she actually polled more votes than a very well-respected long-time member, Lianne Dalziel. Now, how come 10 months later, in the whole of Christchurch, the vote in Christchurch was lower than the national average? Now, that’s a very serious question to answer. I have one idea about it, and that’s organisation. I was a campaign manager for that by-election, and I said to Labour, ‘The reason that we’re doing well here is that we’re highly organised. We’ve focused on the policy.’ And I agree with Helen about reflecting to people what they really need and what their aspirations are and working out specific policies that meet those needs. Now, that’s exactly what we did in Christchurch East, and I don’t think that was done in this election.

Lisa Owen: I just want to do a round robin here.

Jim Anderton: And one of the reasons for that is that Labour no longer has the mass membership of a party that can accomplish that. It can do it in one by-election, but you can’t do it across the country, and that’s the lesson from this election.

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A rare moment of media honesty and genuine insight

The opinion pieces about Labour, the election, Kim Dotcom, Dirty politics, and the Labour leadership are coming thick and fast.  The leaks are like a geothermal field full of geysers and the usual crew are trying to set the scenes for their own teams.

Have we ever seen a more stunning election result? Watching the campaign it was hard to believe the attack on the character of John Key would have no effect.

Even when polls showed the public unmoved by the hatchet book and the news frenzy that followed, it seemed hardly possible that none of the muck would stick.

Until people work out why it didn’t work, they will continue to get it wrong.   And I’m not going to help them.  I know there are screeds  of politicians, their henchmen and media that don’t understand why a month of negative about Key, Whaleoil and myself has actually resulted in a better result for Key, and an absolute strengthening of  my position.

The fact they don’t understand this means they don’t understand much at all.   Read more »

The ‘moments of zen’ in the election

Paul Thomas analyses the election and the “moments of zen”.

The Daily Show‘s Jon Stewart’s signature sign-off is “Your moment of Zen”: a clip of a public figure making a goose of themselves through tone deafness, crassness, vehement ignorance, random imbecility or unconscious irony.

If Stewart had taken notice of our election, he would’ve had more moments of Zen than you could shake a stick at. After a rigorous process of elimination, I’ve chosen a top three.

Third was Internet-Mana party co-leader Laila Harre commiserating with the people of Te Tai Tokerau over the loss of their sitting MP and her co-leader Hone Harawira. Before her next political incarnation Harre might care to familiarise herself with the workings of democracy: the people she was consoling for being deprived of Harawira were the very people who gave him the broom.

Second was Labour leader David Cunliffe’s concession speech in which he did a passable impersonation of a man who’d just won an election. If his year-long impersonation of a leader of the opposition had been half as convincing, neither he nor Labour would be in the dark place they are now.

His shout-out to his staff and Labour’s campaign team was a riot of superlatives – “amazing”, “incredible”, “fantastic” – which raised the question: how catastrophically badly would Cunliffe and Labour have done if he’d surrounded himself with mediocrities?

Number one was Harawira’s comment, early on in the evening, that the people of his electorate “don’t like being ganged up on”. The general reaction to interlopers trying to influence the outcome in Te Tai Tokerau, he said, was “why don’t you guys piss off and leave us to make our own decisions?”.

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Did Hone throw TTT?

Plausible

There is some speculation that Hone Harawira threw Te Tai Tokerau.

It seems, on the surface a strange accusation to level against the man, but it has been a persistent theme this past week.

I decided to think this one through and I’ve come to the conclusion, in Mythbusters style, that the supposition is at least plausible.

Let’s look at some provable facts.

  1. Hone Harawira did a bunk for at least a week during the campaign.
    There were reports of him being in Australia and other parts of NZ. Irrespective of those rumours he was certainly absent from campaign duties for a considerable amount of time.
  2. There  were several fallings out amongst the leadership, the most notable being over legalisation of cannabis
  3. The deal to merge the parties was stitched together by Laila Harre, Gerard Hehir and Matt McCarten and presented to hone Harawira as a fait accompli. He had no input into the process or decision.
  4. It was only the offer of funding that swayed Hone Harawira to accept the merger.
  5. Hone’s wife was against the merger of the Internet party and the Mana party, despite the money.
  6. Hone Harawira didn’t speak at the campaign launch and was barely noticed after Dotcom boasted of hacking and Pam Corkery went feral on the media as Kim Dotcom did a runner out the back way.
  7. The whole concept was really a plan to resurrect the Alliance.

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Anyone still keen to disband the GCSB?

With the globe gearing up to yet another middle eastern conflict pushing thoughts towards a WWIII scenario, it seems rather inconveniently timed for parties and individuals that want New Zealand to stop playing its part in global and domestic security.

The Prime Minister says he is seriously concerned about New Zealanders joining the terrorist group Islamic State.

John Key told Newstalk ZB’s Leighton Smith the Government was aware of a small group of Kiwis who may pose a threat.

I suspect that those are the sort of people that the government gets a search warrant organised for, and then puts them under surveillance.   As if it needs saying – to protect the rest of us.

“They are brutal, they are highly sophisticated, they’re well organised and they’re spreading out.

“We are not immune, so we know there are foreign fighters fighting overseas and we know and can identify at least a reasonably sized that group that want to leave and join that cause,” he said.

Mr Key has said in the past that the Government had concerns about New Zealanders returning home after fighting with foreign rebel groups as they could be a terrorist threat.

Mr Wrongly Wrongson (Aka Martyn Martin Bradbury) and his technology sugardaddy Kim Dotcom wanted to get rid of the GCSB.  The Green Party moaned and moaned over a “New Zealander” indiscriminately killed while accidentally walking under a US drone minding his own business.

These people either directly want to run this country, or they want to be part of making the rules that we live by.  Even though National won fairly comfortably, we were only a few percentage points, a sunny day and an absent Kim Dotcom away from having these people in charge.

I hate to think what a Labour/Green government would do when faced with ISIS threats on home soil.

 

– Newstalk ZB via NZ Herald

Martyn Martin Bradbury gets something right

Political pundit Wrongy Wrongson being wrong again

Political pundit Wrongy Wrongson being wrong again

Martyn Martin Bradbury is the most dead set useless political pundit and strategist in New Zealand.

Not only does he lose with his strategies…he also gets his predictions so wrong it is no longer funny. He started Thee Daily Blog to counter WOBh, claimed they would have a million page views per month by the time of the election…yeah, nah. Then there were his election predictions…rinsed on those too. To cap it all off he ran an attempt to hijack my advertisers, which has backfired as I have more advertisers than ever before.

Kim Dotcom is probably sending in the debt collectors now looking for a refund.

However yesterday he did get something absolutely right…for once.

He has created a list of strategies for Labour to implement that would actually work.

So let’s give the sleepy hobbits what they want, uncomplicated boiled meat and 3 vege politics led by Cameron Slater’s mate, Stuart Nash as leader and Grant Robertson as deputy. Grant will be there to reassure the PSA and EPMU that they don’t need to do much and Stuart to reconnect with the ‘average’ NZer in a way that never threatens the mainstream media’s corporate masters or our neoliberal overlords. Put Goff in as shadow trade minister so America knows its TPPA will get signed, Shearer in as Foreign Affairs so America knows it can get whatever it wants  and Jacinda Ardern somewhere on the front bench so it can pretend to be liberal and gender balanced.

The 5 horse people of the mediocrity.

Stuart Nash has all the ambition of a piranha in a feeding frenzy and this should be his top 6 start list for becoming leader of NZ.    Read more »

No honey, no money

asd

It’s dead.   Read more »

Is Gareth Morgan Stupid Enough to form a Political Party?

Yesterday both me and Arts, Travel and Lifestyle blogger David “Pinko” Farrar blogged that Gareth Morgan is calling for a Blue Green Party.

The time is overdue for a Bluegreens political party, one that is happy to work with whoever is the senior party in government, and is focussed properly on improving our environment, society and economy together. Without this there is a large swathe of voters who are not represented adequately in Parliament. Can the Green Party assume that role? I doubt it very much, theirs is very much a socialist heritage and they exhibit an ongoing reluctance to get real on the importance of the economy. With their voter support capped at 10% (about the same as the craziest party in parliament, Winston Peter’s conspiracy theorists), the electorate continues to see no hope for the Green Party – the adverse impact on jobs and incomes is unpalatable. …

A Bluegreen party would emphatically express New Zealanders’ preference for clever and clean as the way we want our dollars earned, while leaving National and Labour to fight over how social justice is best promoted – via National’s preference for capacity building through education and training, delivering more flexible employment and wage-setting practices; or via Labour’s penchant for widening and lifting of social assistance, greater progressivity of income tax, widening the tax base on income from capital, and greater protection of labour in the workplace.

That is why today I am calling for a Bluegreen party – a party with a true environmental focus rather than a socialist party in drag. Tomorrow we will look at some of the policies such a party could pursue, policies that without a Bluegreen party are being left off the political agenda completely.

I’ve had some additional thoughts about this.  Read more »