Kim Dotcom

Court of Appeal turns down Dotcom: still needs to reveal all assets

I'm coming to steal your democracy

Kim, at his old place, during happier times

In its written decision released today, the Court upheld a High Court decision that Mr Dotcom must file an affidavit spelling out the nature, extent and value of all his assets.

Mr Dotcom’s lawyer Tracey Walker said the High Court rules did not allow the Hollywood studios to go on a ”fishing expedition” relating to Kim Dotcom’s assets.

Poor Tracey isn’t adding to her CV.  Kind of got on the job as Dotcom’s star was no longer on the rise. Read more »

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Why is it Kiwiblog has the best posts when Farrar is away?

Lifestyle, arts and travel blogger David Farrar is away again.

Kiwiblog has again reverted to a blog of David’s mid-life crisis and travels.

Not content with his own travel blogging, he also now has guest travel blog posts.

However he does have a guest post from Kiwi in America that is very good. Why is it Kiwiblog’s best posts are while he is away?

Regular readers of Kiwiblog will recall my lengthy essay posted on Easter Friday about the recent history of Labour; some of it based on my time as an activist there until the mid 90’s attempting to explain Labour’s present day conundrum.

In a nutshell it said that an attempt by the left of the party to seize permanent control of Labour after the massive post Rogernomics ructions under the leadership of Helen Clark, led to a gradual purging of activists from the centrist and right wings of the party. Clark, and her followers in the Head Office and regional hierarchies, ensured the selection of candidates in winnable electorate seats (and after the introduction of MMP, also the party list) that not only ensured she could topple then leader Mike Moore after the 1993 election but also cemented her power base inside Labour guaranteeing her an unchallenged 15 year reign as Labour’s leader. This handed power in the party to an increasingly narrow base of sector and interest groups such as academics, trade unions, progressive feminists and the rainbow coalition gradually driving out activists who were more likely to be white, male, socially conservative, small business owners and church going people of faith. After Labour’s 2008 election defeat, former members of the harder left New Labour Party, homeless after the dissolution of the Alliance, the demise of Anderton’s Progressives and the rise of the Greens, began to come back to Labour assisting in the movement of the party more to the left.

This trend culminated in the amendment to Labour’s Constitution at its 2012 Annual Conference giving 40% of the vote for Party Leader to the party membership and 20% to the affiliated unions leaving only 40% in the hands of the Parliamentary caucus. This new formula enabled David Cunliffe to win the first full leadership primary in 2013 despite having only minority support in caucus – the first time this had ever happened in Labour’s history. The result of his elevation to the leadership was Labour’s third successive and even more disastrous defeat.

When you drive out of the party its more centrist activists, you leave a vacuum that has been filled by harder left activists. When these same activists, alongside the more traditionally left wing trade union leadership, have control of the party’s candidate selections, its policy formation and now the election of its leader, over time you end up with a party, candidates and policies that no longer appeal to middle NZ and a party that is no longer the broad church it used to be. The party may be truer to its left wing principles but it now produces candidates, policies and campaigning rhetoric out of step with the aspirations of floating middle NZ voters that decide elections. National’s moderate centrist direction under John Key has become the natural repository for various key demographic groups that once used to strongly vote Labour and accordingly, Labour has ended up falling further behind National in each subsequent election post its 2008 defeat culminating in its second lowest vote this election since its formation in 1916!

Labour is now undertaking yet another review of why it was defeated and another likely more bruising leadership primary.

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Andrew Little is the first in Labour to admit Dotcom was poison

Andrew Little’s claims for the leadership just got a whole lot more credible with his claims that Labour should have distanced themselves sooner from Dotcom.

Which is telling, because it wasn’t pure coincidence that Labour’s election slogan was Vote Positive.

Andrew Little says voters wanted “greater clarity” about Labour’s potential coalition partners and the party should have clearly spurned Internet-Mana

Interviewed on TV3’s The Nation, he said Labour shares “a lot of things“ with the Green Party, as well as New Zealand First.

“We shouldn’t have had anything to do with Internet Mana. We didn’t make that clear, and I think people were then a little bit suspicious of us,” Little said.

During the campaign, then Labour leader David Cunliffe said he would not allow Internet Mana into cabinet, but said he could work with Dotcom’s party in a broader coalition deal.

“New Zealanders looked at that whole thing. They didn’t like the idea of a very wealthy individual writing out a massive cheque, funding a campaign that was really about his self-interest and a bunch of other people signing up to it,” Little said.   Read more »

Has Kim Dotcom absconded? To London?

This was advertised in The Observer today in London.

Obviously Kim Dotcom can’t get an audience in NZ anymore.

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Deception and Demoralisation

Karl du Fresne talks of deception and demoralisation amongst the left in the wake of Dirty Politics and the so-called Moment of Truth.

I WONDER, was this the most demoralising election result ever for the New Zealand left?

There was an excited buzz in the left-wing blogosphere and in social media in the weeks leading up to the election. There seemed to be a sense that victory was in their grasp, even when the polls suggested otherwise. But they were cruelly deceived.

Their optimism is easily explained. In the early stages of the campaign, they saw the fallout from Nicky Hager’s book Dirty Politics dominating the news bulletins night after night.

After that firestorm had abated, the media turned its attention to Kim Dotcom’s Moment of Truth, with its dazzling line-up of high-profile journalists and leakers from overseas, all eager to tell us how morally bankrupt our government was.

Those on the left observed the adulation heaped on Hager, who was lionised at speaking engagements. They thrilled at the big turnouts attracted by Dotcom and his incongruous handmaiden, Laila Harré. And they deduced from all this that an unstoppable momentum was building, the inevitable result of which would be the unceremonious dispatch of the Key government.

They were wrong. It was a massive indulgence in wishful thinking, and it must have made the left’s defeat even more crushing psychologically.

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A risk worth taking?

When his loss first became apparent Hone Harawira went silent.

Now he says that the whole Internet Mana sellout that he was a party to was a “risk worth taking”.

Hone Harawira says he doesn’t regret his alliance with Kim Dotcom and hasn’t ruled out working with the Internet Party again.

There’s been intense speculation that the Mana Party leader lost his Te Tai Tokerau electorate seat in the recent election due to his connection with the internet mogul and his Internet Party.

However, the Mana Party Leader says that the group needed something to boost their political influence and took a gamble in aligning itself with Mr Dotcom’s Internet Party.

“Was it a risk worth taking? – absolutely it was,” Mr Harawira told TV One’s Q & A programme.

Mr Harawira says he wouldn’t have wanted to go back into Parliament on his own and possibly would have resigned had that been the case.

“I think if we’d been successful in what we were aiming for…we could have done wonderful things in Parliament for those who don’t have a voice”.

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Kim Dotcom speaks, plays hurt victim, sets spin cycle to extra super spin

kimspin

Kim Dotcom has broken his silence about the election and has decided to play the hurt victim card.

Funny how he never paid PR people for image control and always did it himself, yet somehow it is someone else’s fault his political dreams lie in tatters.

He tells TorrentFreak:

Dotcom says that for the sake of the artists he wants Baboom to succeed. But, in order for that to happen, a sacrifice needed to be made.

“The best way to achieve that success was to take me out of Baboom completely. We have a great management team and some brave investors in place. The brand ‘Kim Dotcom’ is toxic and a major distractor to what Baboom is trying to achieve,” he concedes.

He got that right, brand Kim Dotcom IS toxic.

Now for the delusions of the fat man.

But while those same strengths allowed the Internet Party to became a news event every day leading up to the election, Dotcom’s profile and history – by his own admission – became a millstone around the party’s neck. Every aspect of his private life became a point of leverage for his political opposition.

“The Internet Party failed to deliver meaningful change in New Zealand at the last election because of the media spin by our opponents,” Dotcom says.

“They have successfully turned me into a villain, a German Nazi, a horrible employer, a political hacker, a practitioner of prohibited digital voodoo magic and nothing short of a monster. I would hate that guy too if I didn’t know that it wasn’t true.”

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Crippled by Crazies

Russel Norman has come out swinging.

In an interview with Willie Jackson at Radio Waatea he described Dotcom and his pals in the Internet Mana party as “crazies” and they crippled the Greens campaign.

Greens co-leader Russel Norman says Internet Mana was a guided missile aimed at the left.

He says he visited Kim Dotcom at the start of the year to try to convince the internet mogul not to start a political party.

The party went ahead under the leadership of former Alliance MP Laila Harre, who had worked during 2013 as the Greens’ Auckland-based issues director.

Mr Norman says dragging Mana leader Hone Harawira into the mess by convincing him to sell his first list position set the scene for disaster.

“I mean we had enough trouble with John Key standing up every day telling all his nonsense about us and on the other had we had to deal with these crazies. Having them on the radio and tv all the time talking their nonsense, it was like ‘Oh god,’ it did make it incredibly difficult to change the Government at that point because a lot of people who might have voted for Labour went ‘Oh god, if a vote for Labour means a vote for Dotcom and Harre, I’m not going to do that,'” he says

Mr Norman says Internet Mana’s party vote strategy was to spend $3 million trying to take votes from potential Green supporters.

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See ya pal, don’t let the door hit you in the ass on the way out

Hone Harawira has left parliament, he won’t be back.

He sold out his principles, such as they were, and he sold out his people. Now his party is in tatters, wrecked by a fat German crook.

Hone should have listened to his missus who warned him about what might happen. the money blinded him and now he is gone.

Mana leader Hone Harawira has said goodbye to Parliament with a promise that he will not fade away quietly.

Mr Harawira spoke in public for the first time since his election defeat in Te Tai Tokerau two weeks ago, accompanied by his wife Hilda and surrounded by black-clad supporters.

“Believe me when I say Mana will not be going gently into the night,” he told a large crowd in the former Maori Affairs Select Committee room inside Parliament.

He said his farewell was not a sad one and he was leaving “in good heart”.

“Our meetings have not been the sombre and tearful farewell tour for Hone Harawira that others may have hoped for, but rather a joyous and uplifting revival tour for a movement that takes up the challenge of being the conscience of the nation.”

He responded to critics who celebrated his departure after he made a deal to campaign with the Kim Dotcom-backed Internet Party.

“I hear the mean-spirited and ugly voices of those who are desperately keen to see me go, but I don’t have time to respond because we’re too busy focusing on the tasks ahead.”

Mr Harawira only briefly referred to Mana’s election partners the internet Party when he read out a letter from a sympathetic National Party supporter who said he “made a bad call with partners this election”.

Leaders of the Mana and internet parties have not yet met since the election defeat to discuss what went wrong.

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He’s back, but he’s tainted

Vikram Kumar has announced he is back…after his Internet Party gig bombed at the election.

The nine month career hiatus is over. I’m back on the road again.

It’s been “interesting”, as in “May you live in interesting times” interesting.  Definitely recommend people take on a fixed-time commitment outside their usual life paths. If nothing else, it will likely confirm your original life path is in fact right for you.

 

In other words he made a BIIIIIG mistake hooking up with a fat German crook.

Certainly, there are lots of lessons and insights for the learning. Many of them are domain-specific but here are three lessons that I learned again, from a different perspective:

1. Timing is everything

A wise person once told me that if you have medicine but the patient feels no pain, you will be unwanted. When the patient is pain, you’ll be loved. Timing is everything.

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