Kim Jong-il

Watch The Leaked Kim Jong-Un Death Scene From ‘The Interview’

kim-jong-un

The part of ‘The Interview’ the North Koreans didn’t want you to see, but now can because it has been leaked.

Sony caved to the terrorists but the Streisand Effect is now in effect.

Mashable gives some background.

You won’t be seeing The Interview anytime soon, but the 28 seconds that most enraged North Korea, and may very well have doomed the film to oblivion, hit the Internet on Thursday. Though dozens of websites embedded the clip early, they began coming down by late afternoon.

The scene is the film’s climax, and it’s funnier if you know the background: Earlier in The Interview, James Franco’s character Dave Skylark bonds with Kim Jong-un over their mutual love of Katy Perry — particularly the song “Firework” — as they drive around in the supreme leader’s personal tank.

But Skylark later comes to realize that the dictator is truly evil and, in the midst of a chaotic showdown, jumps in the tank as a means to escape. With Kim’s military helicopter bearing down on him, Skylark takes aim at the aircraft from the tank’s turret. As he lets the shell fly, we hear dramatic strains of “Firework” firing up.

And that’s where the 28-second clip, in extreme slow-motion, picked up. We saw Kim Jong-Un leaning out the door of his helicopter, watching the shell pierce the side of the aircraft and explode in a ball of fire. With his mouth agape, the Supreme Leader is slowly engulfed in fire until his head, obscured by the flames, explodes.

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Where is Kim Jong-un?

Has there been a coup in North Korea?

Where is Kim Jong-un?

He has not been seen in public for nearly 40 days. There is increasing speculation that there has been a coup in North Korea.

Foreign Policy analyses the situation:

It’s now been 36 days since Kim Jong Un was last seen in public. Is his absence good for North Korea and the threat it poses to the rest of the world? Or should we hope that he returns?

Most North Korea experts seem to believe that he soon will indeed end his absence — or that he will at least give a signal of his continued grip on power. Oct. 10, which marks the country’s Party Founding Day, has been cited as a possible time for his return. By contrast, many Western news sources — or at least their headlines — are speculating that Kim has met with a serious illness, or been ousted in a coup. Headlines like theGuardian‘s “Kim Jong Un: Has the North Korean Dynasty Fallen?” abound.

Setting aside for now the impossible question of where Kim has gone — Pyongyang’s state-run media say he is sick, though he could also be under house arrest, dead, on vacation, or simply bored of appearing in public — North Korea is arguably much more stable with Kim at the helm. (First, the eternal caveat when writing about North Korea: The country is more opaque than an eye afflicted with cataracts, so much of what I’m writing is speculation.)

The most dangerous thing about North Korea is its unpredictability. Because we know so little about what Pyongyang wants, or why it does what it does, it’s difficult to prepare for contingencies. North Korea has recently taken several steps to improve its ability to fire missiles at the United States: It has upgraded its main rocket-launch site, increased production of fissile material, and tested engines for a missile that could reach U.S. territory. Military planners and decision-makers in the U.S. government — and in other countries — need to be able to predict the likelihood that Kim will launch an attack on their country.

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Is Kim Jong-un really in charge?

There is a school of thought to suggest that Kim John-un isn’t really in charge in North Korea anymore.

Apparently his dad’s goons are.

An elite group of exiles from North Korea gathered in September in the Netherlands to discuss the state of the regime they used to serve. The conference included top diplomats, an ex-senior official of the Ministry of Security, and a high-ranking military officer, but the keynote address was given by Jang Jin-sung, formerly a key member of Kim Jong-il’s propaganda machine. Included in Jang’s speech was a surprising assertion: North Korea is in the midst of a civil war.

According to Jang — a former counterintelligence official and poet laureate under Kim Jong-il — members of the government’s Organization and Guidance Department (OGD), a powerful group of officials that once reported only to Kim Jong-il, have stopped taking orders from his son, Kim Jong-un. The OGD, Jang says, has effectively taken control of the country, and a conflict is simmering between factions that want to maintain absolute control over the economy and others seeking to gain wealth through foreign trade and a slightly more open market.

“On one hand, it’s people who want to maintain a regime monopoly,” Jang told VICE News through a translator in an interview Thursday. “On the other hand, it’s not like people are fighting against the regime, but in a policy sense they want to take advantage to get influence. It’s not actually consciously civil war, but there are these two incompatible forces at play.”

Jang’s statements come during a moment of peak curiosity about the hermit kingdom. Kim Jong-un — the portly 31-year-old who assumed the title of Supreme Leader after his father’s death in 2011 — has been absent from public view for nearly a month. He was last seen walking with a pronounced limp during a July ceremony commemorating the death of his grandfather, Kim Il-sung. He typically presides over the Supreme People’s Assembly, a rubber-stamp parliament, but missed the meeting in early September, and was replaced by a propaganda video that again showed him limping. “Despite some discomfort, our Marshal continues to come out and lead the people,” the film’s narrator said.

That video is hilarious…pure propaganda but from the outside utterly hilarious. Watching the fat little leader waddling along in front of his fat little generals is too funny.

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Secretive Fenton “Jong-Un” Wilson Refuses to Give Information to Councillors

Fenton "Jong-un" Wilson

Fenton “Jong-un” Wilson

The chair of the extremely dodgy Hawkes Bay Regional Council Fenton “Jong-Un” Wilson lurches from one disaster to the next.

In true North Korean fashion Fenton “Jong-Un” Wilson has refused to release information to his fellow councillors. Apparently it is top secret and the elected representatives of the people cannot be trusted with it.

This caused such a donnybrook that Fenton “Jong-Un” Wilson decided that the councillors could see the information but only on his terms.  Read more »

Perhaps Gareth Morgan should take note of this

Gareth Morgan famously rode his motorcycle through the Potemkin villages of NOrth Korea, proclaiming the whole country to be enlightened and not as reported outside of the country.

The man is an idiot. There is ample evidence of the lack of freedom and deprivations suffered by the people of North Korea under the Kim regime.

Yeonmi Park spoke to Australia’s SBS about her defection from North Korea.

I lived in North Korea for the first 15 years of my life, believing Kim Jong-il was a god. I never doubted it because I didn’t know anything else. I could not even imagine life outside of the regime.

It was like living in hell. There were constant power outages, so everything was dark. There was no transportation – everyone had to walk everywhere. It was very dirty and no one could eat anything.

It was not the right conditions for human life, but you couldn’t think about it, let alone complain about it. Even though you were suffering, you had to worship the regime every day.

I had to be careful of my thoughts because I believed Kim Jong-il could read my mind. Every couple of days someone would disappear. A classmate’s mother was punished in a public execution that I was made to attend. I had no choice – there were spies in the neighbourhood.

My father worked for the government, so for a while things were relatively OK for me compared with some others in North Korea. But my father was accused of doing something wrong and jailed for three years. He being guilty made me guilty too, so whatever future I had in North Korea completely disappeared. I could no longer go to university, and my family was forced to move out of Pyongyang to the countryside on the border close to China.

After a few years, my father became very sick with cancer and he came out of jail for treatment. During this time, we decided to leave North Korea.

We had to cross a frozen river in the middle of winter to sneak across the border into China. I was very scared – not of being caught but of being shot. If they see someone escaping, they don’t ask, they just shoot them.  Read more »

Kim Jong-un kills uncle’s entire family

Kim Jong-un is fast getting the reputation for being madder than his father, and that is saying something.

Team America might have to do a sequel at this rate.

It is being reported that he has now executed his uncle’s entire family, firmly cementing his reputation as a ruthless dictator.

The direct relatives of Jang Song Thaek, Kim Jong-un’s recently executed uncle, have all been put to death upon the orders of the North Korean leader, it was reported yesterday

Entire families closely related to Jang, who was purged by the Pyongyang regime in December for allegedly plotting its overthrow, were executed including children and grandchildren, “multiple sources” told South Korea’s Yonhap News Agency.

Among those allegedly executed were Jon Yong-jin, Jang’s brother-in-law and the country’s ambassador to Cuba, and Jang Yong-chol, Jang’s nephew and ambassador to Malaysia, the anonymous sources said.  Read more »

A documentary on North Korea Gareth Morgan needs to see

Gareth Morgan promoted Kim Jong-un and his brutal regime after being glad handed around Potemkin villages and escorted by government officials on his tour of North Korea.

Foreign Policy outlines a new documentary about The Secret State of North Korea:

When director James Jones set out to make a film about life inside North Korea, he decided early on that it would be pointless to go there himself. “I knew if we went to North Korea we’d get what you’ve seen 100 times: the official tour, the military parades, the ski resort,” he told Foreign Policy.

Instead, he hoped to capture stirrings of dissent or, better yet, overt signs of rebellion from an isolated populace long oppressed by a dictatorial regime — the sorts of scenes “people are always desperate to see” but don’t expect to find, he said. For that, he turned to Jiro Ishimaru, a Japanese journalist who operates an underground network of hidden camera reporters inside North Korea — individuals who risk imprisonment and even execution to document life inside a country that has, for decades, been painstakingly hidden from view.  Read more »

Buying the favours of the strong men of North Korea

Kim Jong-il is trying to buy the favours of the military strong men by showering them with luxury items.

Perhaps Gareth Morgan needs to read this to find out his trip through North Korea might not have covered everything.

Imports of pets, saunas, alcohol and electronics into North Korea more than doubled in the year after Kim Jong-un took power in an apparent bid by the young leader to curry favour with senior officials and military officers.

According to a report submitted to the South Korean parliament today, imports of luxury goods amounted to $645.8 million in 2012, a sharp increase from the average of around $300 million a year under his father, Kim Jong-il.

Most of his people may be lacking food, medicine and access to most basic services, but the reclusive regime’s luxury purchases included pets, pet food, bathroom fittings, sauna systems and maternity products, Yonhap News quoted Yoon Sang-hyun, of the ruling Saenuri Party, as telling the parliament in Seoul.  Read more »

Maybe Gareth knows where they are

Gareth Morgan seems to know everything there is to know about North Korea…perhaps he found these missing people on his escorted trip around North Korea.

More than 20,000 inmates of North Korea’s notorious Camp No 22 are feared to have perished during the regime’s recent closure of brutal facility.

The Committee for Human Rights in North Korea (HRNK) claims the prisoners – most of whom have never committed a crime – may have been allowed to die of disease or starvation in the run-up to the camp’s closure last year.

The organisation’s latest report, North Korea’s Hidden Gulag: Interpreting Reports of Changes in the Prison Camps, says the prison population shrank dramatically in the months leading up to December.

According to a report on the Telegraph’s website, defectors of the regime revealed about 8,000 of the 30,000 prisoners may have been transferred to other camps, leaving 22,000 unaccounted for.  Read more »

Gareth Morgan v Liberty Scott

Gareth Morgan is incensed that his view of North Korea has been challenged. He specifically singles out Liberty Scott for some treatment, calling him ignorant.

As you will see it is Morgan who comes off looking ignorant.

Liberty you are ignorant.

My concern is the 25 million Koreans suffering because of this 68 year impasse. The relevant question is whether it is the only way or can we be smarter. I am not supporting the authoritarian regime of North Korea’s or that in Russia (Pussy Riot) or that in China or for that matter, that in Singapore. What I’m saying is that the US as leader of liberal democracies has normal relations with totalitarian regimes when it suits them but push for “regime change” through crazy talk like the vacuous “Axis of Evil” accusation, and demonising the DPRK regime when they sniff the possibility of engineering a Saddam-like collapse. I think it’s called double standards.
I do not see it as defensible to punish 25 million people for a totalitarian regime they are powerless to change. The only way to effect sustainable change is contact, demonstration and persuasion. Not isolation, escalation and humiliation. The DPRK’s reinstigation of its nuclear programme is a direct result of provocation – it’s terrified the US is going to invade it.You need to think more.

Get it?  Read more »