Labour party

Hide: The Mt Roskill byelection could wreck Labour

Could.  Do we dare hope it might?

Oh but Mt Roskill’s Labour’s seat – look at Phil Goff’s majority. Governments don’t take seats off oppositions in byelections – look at history.

But National won Mt Roskill’s party vote last election by more than 2000 votes. That’s a win by 6 per cent. Mt Roskill had more National voters than Labour ones. That’s a bad start for Labour.

Also, low turnout plagues byelections. It can be as little as half that of the general election. That low turnout can dramatically skew the result. I suspect National voters are more likely to vote in Mt Roskill than Labour ones.

And yes the Greens with their new love-in with Labour aren’t standing a candidate, but that makes Labour look weak and desperate.

Plus I don’t think it helps. The Green candidate for Mt Roskill took only 5 per cent last election.

And a great many of those Green voters won’t vote in the byelection having been deprived of their candidate.

It’s a typical situation where even by winning, you can still lose.   Read more »

Will Mt Roskill decide Andrew Little’s fate?

Andrew Little 9

Andrew Little’s future rests on the result in Mt Roskill

Matthew Hooton explores the possibility that the Mt Roskill by-election will determine the fate of Andrew Little.

Both Labour and National are downplaying their chances in Mt Roskill.

National claims that no government has ever won a byelection from an opposition in New Zealand’s history. Labour reminds pundits Mt Roskill has been won by National before, when Gilbert Myles took it from Phil Goff in 1990. They also point out National’s party vote in 2014 was 14,275, just 1090 behind Labour-Green’s 15,365. They then assert that if all the 1240 people who backed Colin Craig’s Conservative Party in 2014 vote National in the byelection, Dr Parmar will win.

You can’t argue with the maths but Labour may be overestimating the willingness of Mr Craig’s supporters to back John Key, the godless money trader who conspired with Helen Clark and Sue Bradford to stop them smacking their kids, and who also was responsible for marriage equality for gay couples.

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Good point Chris, why do Labour keep going around and around in circles?

Chris Trotter wonders why Labour constantly goes round and round in circles.

WHY DOES LABOUR do it? Why is it forever tying itself up in ethical knots and programmatic contradictions? Its policy-making does not seem to proceed from any discernible core of political principle. On the contrary, it comes across as the sort of haphazard collection of fleeting public obsessions a party guided exclusively by opinion polls and focus groups might present to the electorate.

Voters are prepared to forgive National for this sort “suck it and see” approach to policy-making. Most of us understand that the only principle that National will never abandon is the one commanding it to remain in office for as long as possible. Everything else is negotiable – as the Government’s recent swag of policy tweaks and re-adjustments makes abundantly clear.

Nor can the voters object too strenuously to National’s governing style. After all, it is their own likes and dislikes that are being so assiduously fed back to them by the party’s pollsters and marketing specialists.

If democracy is about giving the people what they want, then John Key’s preternatural sensitivity to the slightest change of pitch in the vox populi makes him a democratic leader of no mean ability.

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More pointless grandstanding from Labour that shows they aren’t a government in waiting

Labour really does pick battles that no one cares about.

Parliament is going to debate a Labour Party bill that calls for the immediate election of all the members of Environment Canterbury.

It was drafted by Labour’s Canterbury spokeswoman Megan Woods in response to the government’s sacking of all the regional council’s elected members in 2010.

The government replaced them with commissioners because there had been serious delays in water management decisions.

It subsequently decided on a partial return to democratic representation, and in the local body elections earlier this month seven members of the 13-member council were elected.

The government has appointed the other six.

Ms Woods says that’s not good enough.   Read more »

Does Labour have a future?

A bunch of lefty twats recently had a dinner preaching to the converted about the future of Labour.

One of those was Simon Wilson, the very red-centric former editor of Metro.

What is the point of Labour? Is it a twentieth century phenomenon sliding into oblivion in the twenty-first?

If you’re an urban progressive, the Greens look like a more natural home. If you’re worried about modernity in any or all its forms, New Zealand First is ready and waiting. If you’re a Māori activist, you can choose from the Māori Party and the Mana Party.

If you’re working class? Any of the above, isn’t it?

In reality, Labour gets votes from all those groups. That’s a good thing: major parties need broad appeal. But Labour doesn’t always treat it as a good thing. They let the inevitable contradictions of being a broad church undermine them – this is expressed through absurdly frequent leadership battles – rather than becoming a source of strength.

Actually, there is a point to Labour and it’s a really important one. They’re there to win elections. Labour is the main party of opposition and therefore is likely to be the majority party in any centre-left government. So they have to look credible. They have to be credible.

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Labour’s man ban exported to UK


NZ Labour and UK Labour share lots of ideas. The pledge card was one.  Cash for access and honours is another.

Now it appears another idea has been shared…the ill-fated Man Ban.

Men should be banned from running for Parliamentary constituencies on behalf of the Labour Party until there are an equal number of male and female Labour politicians, a Labour MP has said.

Asserting that female MPs were likely to be the biggest losers from the upcoming boundary review, outspoken socialist MP Jess Phillips has called on Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn to bar men from standing in elections until gender parity has been reached within the party.

“I think the Labour Party has to make every seat an all women shortlist until we get equality,” she said.

“Currently 44 per cent of Labour seats are held by women. We want 50 per cent equality in this party, and for Jeremy to commit to this on the public record.”    Read more »

And so it begins…

With just one Tweet Phil Twyford has signalled the undermining of Andrew Little as leader.

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Phil Quin on trolling

Left-wing trolling merely serves to reinforce the impression that Labour is the nasty party.

Phil Quin describes the Labour acolytes and their trolling in the recent Wellington local body elections.

In the months leading up to the election, a number of Young Labor activists organised themselves into a troll army. Seemingly without relent, they inundated Twitter, Facebook and Reddit with vile, invariably baseless, personal attacks on Nick. Far worse, they aimed their vitriol at Porirua, where Nick had been serving as Mayor.  Porirua, they claimed days before the city received a AA rating from Standard & Poors, was broke (false). Rates had skyrocketed under Nick’s leadership (false). Services had been slashed (false). Nick closed Cannons Creek pool (go there for yourself; he didn’t). Most revealing was their constant, condescending refrain that Nick was somehow selfishly “abandoning” the city, as if Porirua residents are incapable of taking care of themselves. A heady blend of dogwhistling and white man’s burden bollocks.

Now, please don’t get me wrong. These thousands of nasty tweets and posts and comments did not shift a single vote. The vast majority of voters wouldn’t have had a clue what was being said in social media swamps, and are smart enough to ignore it if they had.

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Little gets one right, shame he will be gazumped

Andrew Little got one right yesterday.

For a party that is pro-union, pro-corrections and pro-criminal the announcement that they would fund 1000 extra Police was somewhat surprising.

Labour has pledged to put 1000 extra police officers on the beat in its first term to reverse a “surge” in crime, in new policy unveiled by leader Andrew Little today.

The Police Association says the ball is now in the Government’s court.

“It is a hell of a good start…we will certainly be interested to see how [the Government] respond,” new Police Association president Chris Cahill said.

In a speech to the association’s annual conference, Little said the policy would increase the total number of police officers to 10,000.   Read more »

L is for Labour, L is for losers

Richard Harman snuck into the back of a Fabian Society meeting and found out that there are some on the left-wing dealing with unpalatable truths.

The Labour Party party is failing because it lacks vision.

That near heretical proposition was put to a Fabian Society meeting in Wellington last night by one of the left’s icons, economist, Brian Easton.

Even more provocatively, he argued that the Key-English Government had simply fine tuned the Clark Government’s economic policies and done little to reverse them preferring to promise to run the existing system better.

Out of this, he concluded that social democrats  in New Zealand had long lacked a political vision and that was why they had been unable to counter neo liberalism.

And because of that, the current Labour Opposition lacked a narrative to apply to its critiques of the current Government which might resonate with the electorate.

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