Labour party

Another violent criminal behind bars with a strike on the record

The opposition love criminals, they support them.

Why do I say that, well, it’s easy, they are soft on crime and opposed the three strikes law.

The latest example of scumbag thugs who should be permanently in jail but aren’t has recently played out in the courts.

The Sensible Sentencing trust explains:

A recent Christchurch case reminds us all what a wonderfully effective and discriminating tool the “three strikes” law promoted by Sensible Sentencing Trust, and passed into law in 2010 by the then National – ACT government is proving to be.

After a criminal career comprising 45 previous convictions – nine of them for violence – a Judge has finally put Shane Archbold behind bars for 5 1/2 years, and given him a “three strikes” warning for an aggravated burglary  during which Archold told the victim he was going to “take his eye out” with a tyre iron.

“This guy is an excellent example of why ‘three strikes’ was so sorely needed” said Sensible Sentencing Trust founder Garth McVicar.

“During his 45 conviction criminal career – a quarter of which were for violence – this man has no doubt served a number of prison sentences and been through the revolving door  at the front of the prison that was the criminal justice system. Were it not for three strikes,  at age 36 he could easily have gone on to rack up another 45 convictions, and continued to be let out on parole part way through each pathetic sentence” McVicar said.   Read more »

Trotter is onto it with the loss of Russel Norman

Chris Trotter thinks the bloodless coup within the Greens is a move to push the Green party towards the right.

I think he is right…and as usual wrong at the same time.

RUSSEL NORMAN’S DECISION to step down as the Greens co-leader reflects the party’s longstanding determination to reposition itself rightward. For eight years Norman’s personal energy and political discipline succeeded in turning aside the pleas of a clear majority of the Greens’ membership to break the party out of its left-wing ghetto. Only by exploiting to the full his party’s consensus-based decision-making processes was Norman able to keep the Greens anchored firmly on the left of New Zealand politics.

For eight years Norman strove to fashion a Green Party manifesto that was not only compatible with the Labour Party’s policy platform but would, to a remarkable degree, serve as its inspiration. His astonishing and largely successful mission to master the challenges of contemporary economics; an effort which allowed him to participate in policy debates with an authority sadly lacking in his predecessors, and to drag Labour along in his wake, is probably the most impressive achievement of his leadership.

It was this ability to render the Greens’ left-wing policies economically intelligible that allowed Norman to spike the guns of the Greens’ very sizeable “moderate” (for want of a better description) faction. The latter had demonstrated its power by installing Metiria Turei as co-leader – rather than the overtly left-wing Sue Bradford – following Jeanette Fitzsimons’ retirement in 2008. Had the rules made it possible, this same faction would have radically repositioned the Greens as an ideologically agnostic environmentalist party of the political centre; one capable of forming a coalition with either of the main political parties.

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Labour’s small business focus and their problem with it

Liam Hehir has identified a problem with Labour’s focus on small business.

It is obvious, their complete lack of talent in their caucus of anyone who has run a small business…and of course their spokesperson who has only ever written a few papers while interning in the House of Commons a few years back.

It was encouraging to see Andrew Little push his party to update its definition of working people beyond the narrow paradigm of the cloth-capped worker on the assembly line.

The man has a pretty good chance of being New Zealand’s next prime minister, after all, so it’s good to see him take a realistic view of work in the modern economy.

One difficulty he might have is that his caucus remains light on small and medium-sized business experience. There are only a few members of the caucus, for example, who will have an understanding of what it actually means to grapple with GST, manage debtors, meet payroll and personally bear the costs of regulatory requirements. These are unique pressures that you don’t get as an employee of the state or working in a large company.

I have always liked the story of how former United States senator and Democratic presidential nominee George McGovern came to appreciate this. After losing a re-election in the Republican wave election of 1980, McGovern needed something to do in his retirement years. Having long held an interest in hospitality, he decided to use his savings to buy a small hotel and conference facility in Stratford, Connecticut.

It was not long before a terrible truth dawned on McGovern: being a small businessman was much, much harder than it looked when he was a history professor and a politician. His business went under in less than three years. Most of McGovern’s savings went with it.

In the years that followed, McGovern often wrote about his business failure with great intellectual honesty. He said a big part of the reason his business went bust was that the costs of complying with tightening health and safety requirements had become crippling. Complicated tax rules and business regulations also meant that hotel management had to dedicate a lot of time to form-filling and reporting to various agencies. That left less time to spend actually running and promoting the hotel so that it could attract paying customers.

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Who is Andrew Little? – Can Andrew Little Compete with John Key?

Labour have been confident that they finally have a leader that can compete with John Key.

They were stoked when he said “cut the crap”. They liked his no nonsense, straight talking style, not realising that he would have to actually compete in likability stakes with John Key, as well as competence stakes.

Little’s first head to head confrontation, yesterday’s state of the nation speeches, did not go well for Little.

He ducked and weaved and delivered a speech that was pedestrian at best, and “very flat” or “Even if his delivery and presence at the podium still needs a lot of work” according to whichever left wing pundit you choose to follow.

Whats worse is todays usually reliable Dominion Post has a headline “Key trumps Little on speech day”.

The even more reliable Vernon Small had to point out the obvious, a big win for John Key.

The battle of the speeches has delivered a clear victory to Prime Minister John Key, who set out headline-grabbing plans to revamp social housing, including a potentially unpopular sell-down of thousands of state owned houses.    Read more »

The minority missing in Labour

Labour and Andrew Little have decided to make small business a priority in New Zealand.

Despite signalling in his speech his willingness to assist small businesses, Andrew Little also indicated that he wants to take away workplace flexibility, the single biggest thing that small businesses has been telling Labour in their focus groups.

Small businesses want the 90 day bill to remain, they want flexible tea and meal breaks and they definitely do not want interfering union bosses breathing down their necks.

Perhaps Labour could show they are serious by appealing more another minority group to be added to their caucus representation.

The Labour Party is all about fair representation and all sorts of other bullshit like that.

With the focus now coming on small businesses I want to know when will Labour get small business owners into its caucus.   Read more »

Labour trying to save state baches?

Labour has been boxed in by John Key into fighting for state house tenants.

They have even produced a lovely graphic to go along with it.

state house

That looks like a lovely state house, complete with deck, and outdoor wood burner and some lovely kids sitting on the deck and some towels rolled up in the background.

Is this a state house?

Well the lawn looks suspiciously like kikuyu grass, endemic near beaches these days, yes it is in the suburbs, but better than even chance this “state house” is near a beach.

Especially when you consider the outdoor wood burner on the deck and the towels in the background.    Read more »

Another pinko journalist doesn’t get the message about Andrew Little

What do you mean I need a media person?

What do you mean I need a media person?

Over the last few weeks we have looked closely at Andrew Little, and his speaking style.

As usual the left have said I am critical because he is Labour leader, not because it is an honestly held belief that he is dead set useless.

He hems and haws and bobs and weaves and can’t deliver a decent speech. He is wooden, loses his voice, and gets shouty.  Read more »

Who is Andrew Little? Can Andrew Little Fundraise

littleangryandy

The Labour Party Leadership election proved to be very cheap for the Union backers of Andrew Little.

They didn’t even give him enough to break the donation limit of $500 before it needed to be declared.

Donations received in Labour’s leadership contest, October/ November 2014:

Andrew Little: total of $5000-$6000. None of more than $500.

David Parker: total of $23,000. Donations of $10,000 and $5000 from Rodger Finlay and Selwyn Pellett.

Grant Robertson: total of $18,000. $5000 from an uncle, $1000 from party member Tim Scott and $1900 in printing costs from PrintShop.

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Who is Andrew Little? Did Andrew Little spend the summer preparing for his first speech?

Here is a short clip of Andrew Little’s first speech of the year.

You would have thought that a man in the most important role of his life would have spent the summer working on his speaking. He did not. In 36 seconds he keeps ducking and weaving and looking like he doesn’t belong there.

At several stages in his speech he ran out of breathe and stumbled and stuttered.

And TVNZ obviously didn’t get the memo about what a great speech it was because Katie Bradford apparently said it was a little bit flat. A little bit flat is not going to cut it when it comes to convincing New Zealand that he is our future Prime Minister.

Corin Dann is also disparaging.

Labour Leader Andrew Little has delivered a solid, well-targeted, if unspectacular State of the Nation Address this morning.

The speech was deliberately lacking in policy detail and instead aimed at reassuring business, and in particular the small business owners who’ve deserted Labour, that the party wants to work with them not against them in creating a growing economy.

 

[…]    Read more »

Who is Andrew Little? Where is the Union Members $3 million?

Andrew Little made a huge pitch to the Labour members during the leadership election claiming he was the man who rebuilt the EPMU. As we saw yesterday it was all “I” “I” “I”.

So he was the man responsible.

So why has no one questioned him on the EPMU accounts, which are publicly available? The part to look at is the Education and Training Trust, which is note 18c in the 2013 the accounts.

What appears to have happened is in 1996 $6m of members money was transferred into the Education & Training Trust. At some stage this amount miraculously turned into $3m, with $3m going missing.

Little took over in 1999, he had senior positions until then. There are two big gaps in the accounts.

Note that all union accounts have to be made publicly available and are on www.societies.org.nz (Organisation number 1023) so we are not making anything up, we have just investigated Little’s time as the head of the EMPU and want to know where the money has gone. We also want to know why the accounts do not tell the public, let alone union members, where the $3m is.   Read more »