Law enforcement

Media beating up on cops again, this time for daring to protect themselves

Yesterday the Sunday Star-Times ran a hit piece on a rural cop who routinely straps on his Glock, especially when dealing with domestic incidents.

It was a shameful piece. Our cops have a hard enough job as it is without panty-waisted wombles in the media attacking their every move.

You have to start thinking that the media would like nothing better than a string of dead cops in rural towns such is their insistence that cops shouldn’t be able to protect themselves.

A policeman in rural New Zealand admits he routinely breaches regulations by carrying a firearm and will continue to do so – saying he needs to for protection.

“I work on my own in a remote area, which is why I am able to do this,” he wrote in a letter to the Police Association magazine Police News.

“I have not had a complaint; if anything, very few people even notice.”

The unnamed officer said he carried a firearm “at times” while patrolling.    Read more »

Mega’s little problem with a pesky thing called the law

Kim Dotcom is blowing hard once again on Twitter.

megachat

He is going on about ‘his’ MegaChat…funny thing is he was crying poverty and said he had given all his shares in Mega to his estranged missus…so quite how it is his is another matter entirely. Perhaps he has misled another court?

In any case his boastfulness ignores a problem.

Chris Keall at NBR explains.

Mega has said it will abide by the laws of every company it operates in. As a registered commercial entity it can barely take any other stance.

And when the FBI so successfully eavesdropped on the Skype chats and instant messages Kim Dotcom and his co-defendants while investigating Megaupload, it did so with a warrant issued by a judge.

What would Mega do if a law enforcement agency in a country its service operates in (that is, anywhere), hands it, or one of its users, a lawful warrant asking for encryption keys? In NZ, it has to live under the Telecommunications (Interception Capability and Security) Act, aka TICS, which gives our government broad-brush powers to demand depcryption keys from a service provider when there is a (very broadly defined) threat to NZ’s national interest. This as-yet-untested legislation gives the ICT Minister discretion over who is defined as a service provider. Network operators like Spark, Vodafone, 2degrees are very clearly service providers. It’s more of a grey area for the likes of Microsoft Skype, Google Hangouts and now MegaChat – but I’m guessing the Crown won’t give MegaChat a free pass.   Read more »

Police think it is “shocking” finding people under the new alcohol limit?

I’m starting to wonder about the Police communications strategy.

In just three hours at three different locations in the CBD last night, a team led by Sergeant Chris Painter issued 12 tickets for using cellphones while driving; 22 to “at risk drivers” breaching their licence conditions; 15 to drivers exceeding the speed limit, including 12 doing 11km or more over it; and 14 to drivers for intersection offences such as running red lights or ignoring stop signs.

As well, said Mr Painter, one driver was over the legal alcohol limit, and a “shocking” 34 were just under it.

Why is it “shocking” that people were under the limit…if their blitz was a month ago they would have ben well under the limit…now the limit has dropped and these drivers are still under it…and that is “shocking”?

What drugs are these cops taking?    Read more »

I agree with Keith Locke, take the tasers off the cops…

It is a new year and so I suppose we didn’t have to wait long for Keith Locke to have a bleat about Police and their use of Tasers.

Police have revealed they fired a Taser stun-gun at an offender five times – the latest incident that has Taser critics calling for a review of its use.

The case is contained in statistics released by police about Taser use in the first half of last year.

A police spokesman said the incident involved a violent offender resisting arrest and fighting with an officer in the Counties-Manukau district with the Taser being pressed directly against the body of the suspect in “contact stun” mode.

“While the Taser was discharged [in contact stun mode] five times, three made contact with the person,” the spokesman said.

“Of the three which made contact, the first two were not effective in bringing the person under control, while the third was effective in stopping the violent behaviour.”

Police said two of the discharges missed the offender as he grappled with the officer on the ground.

The suspect was not injured, but a critic says increased use, and two recent Taser-related deaths overseas, suggest the device will kill someone here.

This week 38-year-old Kevin Norris died after being Tasered by police in the New South Wales town of Mittagong.

According to reports, Norris was conscious when taken into custody but died at the police station. His death is now the subject of an investigation.

Former Green MP Keith Locke, who has been a critic of the Taser since it was introduced in 2007, said the death should send a message.    Read more »

du Fresne: Police burned off goodwill with their zero tolerance scam

Karl du Fresne thinks the Police have well over stepped the mark with their zero tolerance scam run these past holidays.

In fact he says it failed.

Human nature is a perverse thing. It consistently thwarts all attempts to coerce us into behaving the way bureaucrats, politicians and assorted control freaks think we should.

Take the road toll. Since early December New Zealanders have been subjected to a ceaseless barrage of police propaganda about the futility of trying to defy speed and alcohol limits.

Stern-looking police officers have been in our faces almost daily, warning that zero tolerance would be shown to lawbreakers. I’m sure I’m not the only one who has found their lecturing increasingly tiresome and patronising.

Of course the police can claim the best possible justification for all this finger-wagging: it’s about saving lives. But what was the result? The road toll for the holiday period was more than double those of the previous two years. For the full year, the toll was up by 44 on the record low of 2013.

The figures suggest that people crash for all manner of reasons, and that the emphasis on speed and alcohol is therefore simplistic. The police focus on speed and booze because these are easy targets, and when the road toll comes down they can take the credit.

In the ideal world envisaged by ever-hopeful bureaucrats, wayward citizens can be managed much as sheep are controlled by heading dogs. But people will never be harangued into driving safely; human nature is just too contrary.

Besides, police crackdowns are only one factor in achieving a lower road toll.

Improved road design, safer cars, better-equipped emergency services and more immediate medical attention all contribute too. It would be interesting to know, for example, how many lives have been saved because of the use of helicopters to get victims promptly to hospital.

Given that their heavy-handed propaganda campaign appears to have had minimal effect, I wonder if the police will now be humble enough to sit down and review their tactics.

Read more »

Liberal hand-wringing over Kiwi criminals in offshore jurisdictions

Watch as the clamour to try and bring our criminal scum back home to  face “justice” in New Zealand rather than the much harsher treatment they will get offshore.

One such person is this Anthony De Malmanche fellow.

The liberal panty-waists are all upset that he might face the death penalty. Well boohoo, only the congenitally stupid don;t know that in most Asian countries the penalty for smuggling drugs at the very minimum is a sound beating and a long time in prison or the worst, a death sentence.

i have little sympathy for them.

The crim-hugging panty-waists though think this is terrible and one such womble is Alexander Gillespie who is supposedly a professor of law at Waikato University (snigger).

He is having a moan that these criminals are hard done by.

Two recent incidents involve Kiwis allegedly involved in trafficking large amounts of methamphetamine. The men were caught in Indonesia and China. These are not cases of attractive females with relatively small amounts of marijuana which would cause debatable social damage.

These are people who, if convicted, will be found to be responsible for the destruction of the lives of hundreds of others. Indonesia and China have a strong interest in putting these individuals on trial. This is standard practice as each state jealously guards its laws to protect its citizens, society and principles.

Accordingly, when people are tried for crimes in foreign countries, it is no defence to say they are foreigners. As the recent debate over the Malaysian diplomat returned to the New Zealand judicial system has shown, the public expect the law to be applied regardless of nationality.

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AA gets it right, stop taxing our motorways with speed cameras

The AA has called for Police to stop targeting soft speeding on relatively safe roads.

Almost half of all tickets from speeding cameras are given out in Auckland, prompting the Automobile Association to urge the police to ease up on targeting low-level speedsters on Auckland motorways and instead focus on higher-risk roads around the country.

The cameras and a decision to lower, over holiday breaks, the usual 4km/h tolerance – and this season even to scrap it – have resulted in a boom in tickets. Twenty-six thousand more were issued each month last year on average than in 2009. That is despite police saying average speeds have dropped.

Last year, an average of 82,000 speeding tickets were issued each month, compared to 56,000 five years before. Much of the increase is down to the crackdown on low-level speeding over holiday periods.

The Police say it isn’t revenue gathering but it is. And Auckland with its extensive motorway network is being targeted as an easy get.

AA spokesman Mike Noon questioned whether focusing on drivers doing just over the limit on relatively safe urban motorways was the best strategy.

“Focusing on low-level speeding on the motorways, we think, is maybe not very beneficial. We’d prefer more focus on higher-risk areas, such as people speeding on State Highway 27 or between Turangi and Taupo.

“We get a bit concerned if there’s too much focus on low-speed tolerances on motorways, particularly since some of those motorways, we think, may move to 110km/h, to reflect the safety of them.”

Read more »

Why do the Police keep insisting speed kills?

Yet again the Police are in the media claiming that speed kills.

It doesn’t.

There are literally thousands of race car drivers who are still alive who can attest tot he fact that speed doesn’t kill.

What kills is stupidity, and sudden stops into hard objects.

But the Police keep on insisting speed kills.

When you look at their examples too you find that in one of them that speed didn’t kill, in fact the driver is still alive.

One man was detected driving 240kmh on the Waikato Expressway before he was pulled over.

“This speed is simply reckless,” said Grace.

She said that at that speed it would take 12 seconds and 450 meters to stop – given that the vehicle was in good condition of course.

“If you are travelling at this speed, and something untoward happens up to 450 meters in front of you – the chances of you being involved in a collision are high.”

Read more »

Time to arm the cops?

judith-collins-minister-of-gun-ownership1

Judith Collins thinks it is time to arm the cops.

The sooks disagree, even arts, lifestyle, fitness and travel blogger, David Farrar, disagrees. He thinks it will lead to an arms race amongst the criminal fraternity.

I don’t know what planet he lives on but the criminals are already armed.  Every time there is a drugs bust there are numerous firearms confiscated.

Another issue for police going into violent homes is how to keep themselves safe.

Police will often say that the most dangerous situations for them are family violence calls.

Every kitchen has knives, some homes have guns.

They don’t know what the layout of the home is, how many people are there, what reception they’ll get.

These days front-line police have access to tasers and better access to firearms. As we’ve seen lately, going into a hospital can lead to being shot at.

Even though police have access to firearms in their car lockboxes, I’m concerned that they too often feel that they can’t take them.   Read more »

Stephen Franks on the lie that is the Religion of Peace

Stephen Franks is a smart man, he has realised that we are in a war and he is now speaking up.

He explores the statements made by defence expert Dr David Kilcullen about the fight against ISIS and what we have to do to combat militant Islam.

Kilcullen highlights the risks from our internal responses (if the West fails to destroy the caliphate’s appeal to its own citizens):

“…if we fail to face the threat where it is today — primarily overseas — we’ll suffer the consequences at home. This isn’t to rehash some Cold War domino theory in which we “fight them there or we’ll fight them here”. It’s just to recognise the reality that a purely isolationist, defensive, policing strategy — protecting ourselves at home rather than seeking to defeat terrorism abroad — ultimately means the end of society as we know it. Mass surveillance, secret police, a national-security state, guards on every gate, a garrison society: that’s what a “defensive” strategy actually entails.”

He seems to be warning against the current mealy-mouthed approach to Islam within our countries, pretending that the conservative Islamic leaders, their schools and their doctrine are part of the solution, instead of recognising that they are fuel for the problem:    Read more »