Law enforcement

Face of the day

One of New Zealand's finest is today's face of the day.

One of New Zealand’s finest is today’s face of the day.

I am a big fan of the New Zealand Police and today’s face of the day is a courageous constable who deserves our thanks and respect. Too often people are quick to criticise our cops when they put their bodies on the line every day to protect and serve. Thank you Constable Ben.

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The only thing this cop did wrong was not empty his magazine

As is usual a Coroner has made a pigs arse of a case, trying to blame some cops for the death of a ratbag who presented and fired a shotgun at cops.

Officers acted outside their training during the 2011 fatal police shooting of a Hastings teenager, a coroner has found.

Lachan Kelly-Tumarae, 19, was killed after a 14-shot volley from a police officer’s Glock pistol at Omahu on March 28, 2011.

Coroner Peter Ryan’s findings, released yesterday, said the three officers involved in Mr Kelly-Tumarae’s death “did not follow police policy and training in the moments prior to the shooting”.

The report called for police to review training protocol in relation to the verbal warning issued by armed police officers to armed offenders, and the frequency of firearms training.

Mr Kelly-Tumarae was shot as he got out of a vehicle near a State Highway 50 marae cemetery, following a 14km low-speed pursuit from Napier where he had presented a shotgun at an officer in a chance roadside encounter.

Moments before the shooting, the teenager pointed the shotgun at an officer in the passenger’s seat of a patrol car parked alongside him.   Read more »

Police pandering to Maori, creating separate justice system?

Hone Harawira and his ilk like to claim that Police brutalise Maori on purpose and pick on them, which is why apparently they have filled up our jails with Maori inmates.

We have seen that Corrections has special rules for Maori inmates….and now it seems the Police have been infested with this politically correct rubbish.

In the latest Police Ten One, their magazine, there is an article that shows just how far Police are being over backwards in caving to political correctness and letting Maori criminals walk away scot free from crimes.

Police headline from latest Police Ten One magazine

Police headline from latest Police Ten One magazine

One of the great successes of Policing Excellence has been the use of pre-charge warnings – particularly in dealing with minor offending by Maori.  Read more »

Labour can’t stop hating cops

So crime continues to fall and there are more cops on the streets.

The occasional well done from the opposition wouldn’t go amiss.

But no. Labour are incensed that the good work is being done under National, and are concentrating  on hugging crims like Arthur Taylor.

And the politician who is aspiring to be the next Minister of Police, Jacinda Ardern, just can’t stop attacking cops.

According to her, the big issue facing this country is making sure cops get the sack – not that crims are held accountable.

And she seems to infer that the IPCA isn’t playing with a straight bat:

Police spokesperson for Labour Jacinda Ardern is one who has raised concerns. Ardern, a member of the Law and Order Select Committee to which the IPCA reports, wants a higher ratio of IPCA board members and investigators who are not former members of police.    Read more »

All the tinfoil hat wearers are coming out of the woodwork over the CCTV plans for Auckland

I’ve been listening to NewstalkZB this morning and all the tinfoil hat wearers are calling in about the CCTV plan for Auckland.

One nutter even rang in talking about how smart meters for electricity are emitting radiation and frying our brains, along with them being part of a government plot to raise power charges…no doubt she has wrapped her meter box in tinfoil.

Another guy called about how he no longer uses cellphones because they poll cel tower emitting radiation, even in his tinfoil lined room, which just bounce the radiation from his phone around and around.

Auckland Council is being asked to explain its plans to build a city-wide surveillance network which could have facial recognition technology, The New Zealand Herald reports.

The network of CCTV cameras would be available to police so the could monitor crime, traffic, emergencies, and public safety issues.

But Batch Hales from the Council for Civil Liberties says it’s unclear why the city would need it.    Read more »

While the opposition plays games National focuses on the things that matter

The opposition continues to play games, entertaining and cavorting with crooks, dreaming up policies that create more problems than they solve.

Meanwhile the National government carries on making a difference on things that actually matter, like reducing re-offending for criminals.

Corrections Minister Anne Tolley says the Government is now over half way to achieving the Better Public Service target of a 25 per cent reduction in reoffending by 2017.

Reoffending has fallen by 12.6 per cent against the June 2011 benchmark, resulting in 2,319 fewer offenders and 9,276 fewer victims of crime each year.

“These figures are extremely encouraging, and combined with a 17.4 per cent drop in recorded crimes over the last three years it shows our communities are safer,” says Mrs Tolley.

“I want to thank our Corrections and Probation staff for embracing our bold plans and for all their efforts in reducing reoffending.

“There have been unprecedented increases in prisoner and community offender rehabilitation under this Government, which are already paying dividends.  Read more »

Who knew? Climate Change causes increased crime

This was published on Stuff. Apparently climate change will cause increased crime…who knew? There is a list of things caused by climate change…now crime can be added to it.

Someone somewhere funds this crap.

A new study broadens a notion held by the earliest criminologists: Periods of higher temperatures – on an hour-by-hour or week-to-week basis – are likely to produce more crime.

The study by Matthew Ranson of Abt Associates, a research and consulting firm in Cambridge, Massachusetts, suggests global warming will trigger more US crimes including murders and rapes over the next century, with social costs estimated to run as high as US$115 billion.

Between 2010 and 2099, climate change can be expected to cause an additional 22,000 murders, 180,000 cases of rape, 1.2 million aggravated assaults, 2.3 million simple assaults, 260,000 robberies, 1.3 million burglaries, 2.2 million cases of larceny and 580,000 cases of vehicle theft, the study published this week in the Journal of Environmental Economics and Management says.  Read more »

Finally. A law that will actually be enforced

I hate pointless laws.  Like microchipping dogs to “prevent” them attacking children.

But here we have one that’s a winner.  Doesn’t go as far as I would like, but at least it is practical.

Drivers who refuse to pay speeding fines will have their licence confiscated – sometimes on the side of the road – and possibly lose their car under changes due in months.

From February, the Justice Ministry will ramp up efforts to recoup more than $200 million in outstanding traffic fines, most for speeding.

It will issue Driver Licence Stop Orders as a last resort to people who repeatedly ignore warning notices or court orders.

Any person found driving in breach of one of the orders will have their car impounded for 28 days.

Associate Justice Minister Chester Borrows said in some cases people would have to surrender their licence on the side of the road if police detected an order was in place.   Read more »

IPCA needs to mandate better shooting and empty magazines

The IPCA has found the cops were justified in shooting a ratbag who took a hammer and knife to his missus…unfortunately he survived after being Glocked.

Perhaps the IPCA should come out with a recommendation that Police attend more training so they can shoot better and require they empty the magazine at the target.

Police were justified in shooting a man who attacked his pregnant partner with a hammer and a knife, an independent inquiry has found.

Ruka Hemopo, 47, survived being shot by police with a Glock pistol and a Taser stun gun during a domestic incident in the Porirua suburb of Waitangirua on May 2.  Read more »

Why most don’t care about GCSB

Foreign Policy has a very good article about the fuss over “spying” and why most people simply don’t care.

For most people, privacy, too, has become the “shining artifact of the past” that Leonard Cohen once sang about. Indeed, anyone with a mobile phone understands that everything from their bank records to the products they buy online to the telephone numbers they dial and the addresses to which they send emails are recorded somewhere — whether by a private business, their own employers, or, of course, the government.

We are being spied on all the time, and usually by private enterprise…and the media.

Viewed from this perspective, is it the general public’s comparative lack of indignation over the NSA surveillance scandal that is surprising, or is the real shocker that journalists, activists, and politicians feel so outraged? Yes, the U.S. government is indeed the Biggest Brother of them all, but most people go about their daily business being spied on and having their data mined by any number of small- and medium-sized brothers. Of course, someone who is outraged by the attempts to jail the leakers and prosecute and intimidate their journalist and activist colleagues would insist, and rightly so, that these sorts of things should not be permitted in a democracy. But the gap between the outrage of the chattering classes and the public’s apathy — or, more likely, resignation — illuminates the essential difference between the elite’s understanding of the world and everyone else’s. To put it starkly, members of an elite tend to believe they can change things; most everyone else knows that, except in a few rare instances, they cannot. In an essential sense, the real question for members of the elite is not, why isn’t the public outraged, but why are we?  Read more »