lies

What did Little expect when he accused a forensic accountant of lying?

Andrew Little should apologise to tax expert John Shewan for treating him with utter contempt and total disrespect.

Mr Little has been caught out big time — and it serves him right.

Mr Little got things wrong about Mr Shewan and has to put them right.

So Mr Little issued a retraction — at 5:17pm on Saturday, June 20 — two hours and 18 minutes before kick-off of the Wellington Test.

This is so cynical it is sad. Everybody knows that is the absolutely dead time in a media cycle when it would get the least attention. It is cunning and awful and rude and Mr Little’s actions show why people distrust politicians.

Now things have bounced back on Mr Little and his own credibility is being called into question — and it serves him right.

A lot of this is arcane and complex but it is important because Mr Little is auditioning to be Prime Minister. His actions and his words are important.

Mr Little yesterday repeatedly said that Mr Shewan did not ask him for an apology about incorrect statements made about him.

So then Mr Shewan pulled out a letter to Mr Little that said: “I now request the statement I sent to you yesterday be issued with the following additions: ‘I apologise to Mr Shewan for any embarrassment I have caused him through my statements’.”

Sadly for Mr Little, it doesn’t get much clearer than that. Contrary to his public claims, Mr Shewan asked for an apology.

It seems Little lies a little too easily and, more surprisingly, he does so when the potential damage far outweighs the benefits.

It is clear that Andrew Little is easily manipulated into taking a position that he will then blindly defend.   Not a “take a backward step” kind of man. That’s a useful trait for a union boss. It is quite a liability for a politician. Read more »

Photo Of The Day

blindsided Blindsided

A Dream Engagement Turned Nightmare

 “You think you’re in love with someone, and you want to believe her. Now I look back, and I don’t believe anything she told me.”

Don Huckstep thought he’d found true love in his small hometown of Fowler, Indiana. But when Teri Deneka mysteriously vanished from his life, the disappearance foreshadowed a bizarre—and grisly—series of discoveries that left Huckstep, police, and another man’s family with more questions than answers.

Every now and then, Don Huckstep wonders how the heck it happened. How did a normal, everyday guy from Indiana get caught up in a bizarre, made-for-TV drama? Mostly, though, he tries to forget.

Where to start? Maybe near the end, right before everything unravelled. In the summer of 2014, Don was on a roll. At age 57, he had a nice home in Lafayette, a job he loved in sales and marketing, and a fiancee he adored named Teri Deneka. The couple was planning a trip to Italy for an early honeymoon, after which they’d return home to say I do.

To Don, it seemed the getaway couldn’t come soon enough for Teri. She had been under a lot of stress for months. Her 68-year-old mother, Nena Metoyer, had leukemia, and in August she came up from Florida to stay in Teri’s home in the small town of Fowler, Indiana, so Teri could care for her. But Nena’s condition worsened. Teri told Don she was taking her mother to visit family in Chicago. On September 11, Teri texted him. “My mom past [sic] last night,” she wrote. “I don’t want to talk right now. I just wanted you to know. As soon as they release her, I’m taking her to Florida. I’ll call you when I’m ready.”

Don barely heard from his fiancee over the next several days, receiving just a few brief texts, which included a cryptic apology. “It’s just a hard time for me and I really don’t want to talk to anyone but I do love you,” Teri wrote. Don tried to give her space. They had talked about death before. Neither handled it well. He understood her need to be alone.

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Photo Of The Day

Norman Baker, Holding A Subjects Head, At A Demonstration Of His Hypnosis Treatment, 1900. Born November 27, 1882, in Muscatine, Iowa, Norman Baker, was the last of 10 children delivered to wealthy factory owner John Baker and his wife Frances. Young Norman left school at the age of 16 to work as a machinist in his father's factory. Baker became fascinated, however, by a hypnotist act that he saw as part of a vaudeville show that had traveled to his small, rural town. Baker soon began his own vaudeville act in 1900, called The Madame Pearl Tangley show, where he had a beautiful woman "read" the minds of spectators in the audience.

Norman Baker, Holding A Subjects Head, At A Demonstration Of His Hypnosis Treatment, 1900. Born November 27, 1882, in Muscatine, Iowa, Norman Baker, was the last of 10 children delivered to wealthy factory owner John Baker and his wife Frances. Young Norman left school at the age of 16 to work as a machinist in his father’s factory. Baker became fascinated, however, by a hypnotist act that he saw as part of a vaudeville show that had traveled to his small, rural town. Baker soon began his own vaudeville act in 1900, called The Madame Pearl Tangley show, where he had a beautiful woman “read” the minds of spectators in the audience.

Crescent Hotel History

 Norman Baker Struck Snake Oil

Norman Baker had worked at a myriad of careers—magician, inventor, radio evangelist—in his lifetime, none of which qualified him to be a medical doctor. But this didn’t stop him from opening up a medical practice in his home state of Iowa and later in 1937, when he had been run out of town, in a hotel in Eureka Springs, Arkansas. The Crescent Hotel, where the notorious “Doctor” Baker treated his patients and promised to cure them of cancer, still exists after all these years. Most of Dr. Baker’s patients, however, barely lasted a few weeks under his care…

Perched on the crest of West Mountain above the Victorian village of Eureka Springs, Arkansas is the historic 1886 Crescent Hotel & Spa. The 78-room resort hotel is not only known as one of America’s most distinctive and historic destinations, but it is also renowned for a bevy of spirits that are said to continue to walk upon the palatial grounds.

Built by the Eureka Springs Improvement Company and the Frisco Railroad, the hotel was designed by Isaac L. Taylor, a well-known Missouri architect who had designed a number of famous buildings in St. Louis. Twenty-seven acres at the north end of West Mountain was chosen for its majestic location overlooking the valley.

It was an important time in Eureka Springs’ history as the “healing waters” of the Ozarks had become well known across the nation. People from near and far were swarming to the area in hopes of curing their ailments and easing their pains. The developers of the Crescent Hotel & Spa planned to take advantage of these many travelers by building the most luxurious resort in the country.

Powell Clayton, a former governor of Arkansas from 1868 to 1870, formed the Eureka Springs Improvement Company in hopes of taking advantage of this prosperous period. Along with a number of other investors, the Frisco Railroad joined in on the plan, knowing that the resort could only spur their business.

Numerous stonemasons were brought in from Ireland to begin the construction in 1884. Due to the density of the magnesium limestone used to build the hotel, special wagons were constructed to move the massive pieces of stone from the quarry site on the White River. Designed in an eclectic array of architectural styles, the masons built 18 inch walls, a number of towers, overhanging balconies, and a massive stone fireplace in the lobby.

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Little smears, defames and lies and then blames it on relying on a media report

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John Shewan, the tax expert appointed to review New Zealand’s foreign trust laws, has flatly rejected a claim that he advised the Bahamas government on ways to protect that country’s tax haven status.

The claim was made by Labour leader Andrew Little, who is attacking Prime Minister John Key for appointing Mr Shewan.

In parliament on Wednesday, Mr Little asked Mr Key: “Does he not see that there is a fundamental problem with appointing a person to review our foreign trust laws who has advised a government on how to protect its tax haven status?”

Mr Little said Mr Shewan, and former Reserve Bank governor Don Brash, were asked to go to the Bahamas by Mr Key.

At least he got Mr Shewan’s name right.   The truth however, is a totally different matter.   Read more »

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I’ve been a naughty girl

When your husband is being sued by Mr X for hundreds of thousands of dollars you have to have a sense of humour. I went looking for some cheap thrills yesterday and found them on the following facebook page.

 

screenshot-whaleoil.co.nz

screenshot-whaleoil.co.nz

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A tale of lies and literary devices

When is a lie not a lie? When it is a literary device ( according to Colin Craig) Does his explanation hold water or is it just another literary device lie?

Being an ex-High School English teacher I am very familiar with literary devices. When my students were working on creative writing I encouraged them to use them and also when they were writing a speech as persuasive language uses them.

Colin Craig has claimed that using a Nom de plume is a literary device. I have searched a long list of literary devices for nom de plume and  it was not included as a literary device.  A nom de plume is a writer’s pseudonym. Other common words with similar meanings are pen name, assumed name, incognito, alias, false name, professional name, sobriquet, stage name and nickname.

What Colin Craig has done is not accurately described by the word nom de plume, as that word is for the writer of a narrative. In this case the false name was used to describe the person interviewed by the writer not the writer himself. The writer of the ‘interview ‘ is still unknown. We do not know their name let alone have a nom de plume for them.

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Face of the day

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Dirty Media – Herald Admits Making S##t Up

Screenshot 2015-04-26 at 22.49.32

Which part of “we made it all up” haven’t the Herald said here?

Embellishing… not something decent, trained and skilled journos do, surely?

Regan at Throng had a blinder about Sky TV yesterday.  Today he climbs into the NZ Herald.

herald-x-factor-bsMost days I find something in the NZ Herald that really makes me angry. The number of times I have read things that are simply not true or have had massive embellishment is astounding. Take this utter nonsense that the NZ Herald leads with this morning.

According to the once proud bastion of the fourth estate,

Television mogul Simon Cowell – whose company Syco Entertainment created The X Factor reality format – had no knowledge MediaWorks had used convicted killer Shae Brider on The X Factor NZ and is taking the matter “very seriously.”

That sounds very ominous indeed, except that Simon Cowell said none of that at all. Read more »

Face of the day

Alastair Thompson

Alastair Thompson

To be fair, Alastair Thompson has many reasons for his intense dislike of Cameron Slater as he has been exposed a number of times on Whaleoil for his dodgy dealings.

However he has now resorted to making things up in order to try to get his revenge. Actually that is too polite. He is defaming Cameron with statements that he knows very well are lies.

It is one thing to hit your opponents by exposing facts, it is quite another to deliberately defame them.

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