Livestock

Richard Branson hands in his man card to become a fussy eater

Richard Branson has decided that he won’t eat meat anymore.

Richard Branson gave up beef earlier this year.

“More and more people recognise that conventional meat production can have truly devastating environmental impacts,”¬†he wrote¬†in a blog about producing food for future generations as part of¬†World Food Day¬†on Thursday.

“It’s one of the reasons I gave up eating beef earlier this year, and it looks like I am not the only one. Surprisingly, for myself, I haven’t missed it at all.

“If we could get many other people to do the same, we would be healthier, and we would help sustain the beautiful biodiversity we are losing in the rainforests.”

Branson is referring to the increasing demand for meat as the world’s population of ¬†7 billion grows and the impact this has on the environment. ¬† Read more »

Face of the day

sheep_0

Some scientists have been studying farts and burps.

More precisely, sheep farts and burps.

Read more »

Photo Of The Day

Goats-on-Trees-in-Morocco

Goats on Trees in Morocco

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King David wasn’t a camel jockey

Helen Clark might have been a camel jockey but Kind David probably wasn't

Helen Clark might have been a camel jockey but Kind David probably wasn’t

New evidence suggests that domesticated camels haven;t been around for as long as previously thought and certainly not in the time of the kings from the bible.

There are too many camels in the Bible, out of time and out of place.

Camels probably had little or no role in the lives of such early Jewish patriarchs as Abraham, Jacob and Joseph, who lived in the first half of the second millennium B.C., and yet stories about them mention these domesticated pack animals more than 20 times. Genesis 24, for example, tells of Abraham’s servant going by camel on a mission to find a wife for Isaac.

These anachronisms are telling evidence that the Bible was written or edited long after the events it narrates and is not always reliable as verifiable history. These camel stories ‚Äúdo not encapsulate memories from the second millennium,‚ÄĚ said Noam Mizrahi, an Israeli biblical scholar, ‚Äúbut should be viewed as back-projections from a much later period.‚Ä̬† Read more »

Taking the Cow Menace Seriously

It looks like someone is finally taking the menace of killer cows seriously.

Scientists are trying to create a ‚Äėhealth and safety‚Äô cow by genetically modifying the animals to have no horns, in order to reduce the risk of injuring farmers, walkers and other creatures.

Researchers are using gene-editing techniques to insert a DNA patch into the genome of Holsteins, Britain’s foremost dairy breed, to suppress horn growth.

The extra DNA has been taken from other breeds of cattle to create a dairy cow that is identical in every respect to existing livestock but without the horns.¬† Read more »

Killer Cows, Ctd

Cows and cattle are so evil they can best be described as having a wrong end and a wrong end. In this case my understanding is they may have worked out why some of their mates have gone down the road in a truck and not come back. The cows are revolting.

A man attacked by a longhorn cattle beast has been flown to hospital by the Palmerston North Rescue helicopter with serious stomach and chest injuries.

Eyewitnesses say the 61-year-old man was repeatedly lifted from the ground by the animal during the attack this afternoon at a Woodville property.

The man was stabilised at the scene before being airlifted to hospital in a critical condition.

Meat and Depression

The Telegraph

It always pays to listen to your body. I bet if they did the study in me it would show an even bigger reduction in depression….I mean it would wouldnt’, all that yummy meat would make anyone feel happy.

I knew meat was good for me….I think I will have a great big Wagyu steak to celebrate:

Women who reduce lamb and beef in their diets are more likely to suffer depression, according to the new study.

Experts admitted surprise at the findings because so many other studies have linked red meat to physical health risks.

The team made the link after a study of 1000 Australian women.

Professor Felice Jacka, who led the research by Deakin University, Victoria, said: “We had originally thought that red meat might not be good for mental health but it turns out that it actually may be quite important.

“When we looked at women consuming less than the recommended amount of red meat in our study, we found that they were twice as likely to have a diagnosed depressive or anxiety disorder as those consuming the recommended amount.

“Even when we took into account the overall healthiness of the women’s diets, as well as other factors such as their socioeconomic status, physical activity levels, smoking, weight and age, the relationship between low red meat intake and mental health remained.

“Interestingly, there was no relationship between other forms of protein, such as chicken, pork, fish or plant-based proteins, and mental health. Vegetarianism was not the explanation either. Only nineteen women in the study were vegetarians, and the results were the same when they were excluded from the study analyses.”

Professor Jacka, an expert in psychiatric health, believed the diet of the sheep and cattle was relevant.

“We know that red meat in Australia is a healthy product as it contains high levels of nutrients, including the Omega-3 fatty acids that are important to mental and physical health,” she said.

“This is because cattle and sheep in Australia are largely grass fed. In many other countries, the cattle are kept in feedlots and fed grains, rather than grass. This results in a much less healthy meat with more saturated fat and fewer healthy fats.”

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Maths isn't her strong point

Sue Kedgley is a classic “other¬†person”. She tells people to catch¬†the¬†bus but doesn’t catch one herself. Now it turns out she isn’t too crash hot at maths either.

Green Party MP Sue Kedgley is calling for the Commerce Commission to investigate how retail dairy prices are set in New Zealand.

Kedgley says the Ministry of Agriculture’s review of the domestic milk market, ordered by Agriculture Minister David Carter last month in response to public anger over rising milk prices,¬† comes close to being a “complete whitewash”.

The ministry’s report said it could not comment on whether there was sufficient competition in the domestic market because it did not have the powers to investigate.

It said current law governing the dairy industry promoted competition, but did not ensure it.

Kedgley says the report failed to address the central issue of lack of competition in the domestic market.

“It doesn’t tell us how the price of milk is set. Farmers say they receive less than 30 per cent of the price of milk, but it fails to shed any light on what makes up the other 60 per cent,” she says.

“These are all valid questions and it’s time that we had some transparency into how domestic prices are set, and some asurance that supermarkets, or Fonterra, are not putting exhorbitant mark-ups on milk.”

Not only does she fail basic arithmetic, she also demonstrates a complete lack of knowledge of the mechanics of how a raw product gets into the plastic bottle and onto the supermarket shelves.