Lorraine Skiffington

Is this the most shameless woman in New Zealand?

The expose of Maori stand-over by Sir Ngatata “Too Much” Love and his partner Lorraine Skiffington continues…they have certainly picked the pockets of much of Wellington. Nudge, Nudge, wink, wink, use the missus bro:

Sir Ngatata Love’s partner was paid more than $170,000 to resolve a property dispute for the Wellington City Council, which was unaware she was also being paid by developers planning to build on the land.

Documents released under the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act show the council engaged Lorraine Skiffington to secure a sale and purchase of 2 Lambton Quay.

The site of the former Cecil Hotel was acquired by the Government during World War II to house US troops, but the Edmonds family fought a protracted legal battle against the Crown and the council to win it back in 2005 and 2006.

Council chief executive Garry Poole told The Dominion Post the council was left in a weak position on land needed for the capital’s transport system, with owners who had refused to negotiate with it.

Sir Ngatata, the Tenths Trust chairman, approached Mr Poole in May 2007, believing he could use his good relationship with the Edmonds “as a means of ending the stalemate”.

He proposed Ms Skiffington be engaged as a lead negotiator to strike a deal between the Edmonds family and the council, which would cover her costs, at $350 an hour.

Mr Poole said the council believed she worked as a lawyer for the Wellington Tenths Trust.

Over the following six months she filed three invoices totalling $154,350 plus GST.

She forgot the bill for sorting out the Taniwha

David Farrar blogs about the brownmail currently being exposed in Wellington involving Ngatata “Too Much” Love and his current missus Lorraine Skiffington.

I’m not going to comment on the legality of this, because the sheer greed and audacity is enough in itself. She wanted $8 million for “air rights” above Wellington Railway Station. I’m surprised she didn’t also ask $10 million for mineral rights beneath the building.

I see Barry Hart got struck off for over-charging his clients by a few thousand. He obviously did not think big enough.

I see from the extensive list of “fees” she may have missed out the mother lode…She forgot the bill for sorting out the Taniwha that surely must dwell somewhere near the railway station.

Brownmail scuppers LOTR museum

Diabolical liberties and stand over appear to have stopped a Lord of the Rings museum being created in Wellington. Just like with water and wind and anything else that is thought to have some value there is now gang-like stand over tactics in place extracting or attempting to extract large sums of cash.

If it was anyone else the folks at the SFO or Police would be paying a visit. The behaviour of Ngatata Love and his minions at the Tenths Trust are another reason I would look at decamping the bureaucracy from Wellington.

Sir Peter Jackson’s plans to build a world-class film museum in Shelly Bay were scuppered when Sir Ngatata Love’s partner sought $750,000 in consultancy fees to help secure the land.

Months before the Port Nicholson Block Settlement Trust gained the right to buy the former air force base on the Miramar Peninsula from the Crown, Jackson wrote to Sir Ngatata outlining a plan to create a permanent home for his vast array of Lord of the Rings props.

“I have always thought that Shelly Bay would be an ideal site for a state-of-the-art exhibition building of international standard,” Jackson wrote in March 2008.

He added that he was concerned about commercial exploitation of coastal Wellington and he would be “honoured” to discuss the plans personally with Sir Ngatata. Discussions over the following months were expanded to include a digital training school on the site.

But the plans were abandoned after Sir Ngatata’s partner, Lorraine Skiffington, approached Matt Dravitzki, general manager of Jackson’s Wingnut Films, seeking up to $750,000 plus GST – including $250,000 up front.

In return, Ms Skiffington, a lawyer, undertook to conduct work including securing the acquisition of the land, and composing a master plan and publicity plan.

Under the proposal, Jackson and partner Fran Walsh would pay Ms Skiffington $250,000 on execution of the agreement. Further funds would be paid on monthly invoices following receipt of tax invoices.

Services were to be capped to a maximum of $750,000, plus GST.

A source close to Jackson called the consultancy proposal “a serious turnoff” for the director.

Days later, Ms Skiffington pursued Mr Dravitzki for progress on the agreement, as Sir Ngatata was about to have a meeting with Wellington City Council chief executive Garry Poole about the plan.

“He [Sir Ngatata] and I resonate with their core values,” she said. “Now that the [deed of] settlement has been signed, we cannot delay.”

Jackson and Walsh were unimpressed when they were shown the consultancy deal draft – and refused to sign.

So Peter Jackson would not be a party to such activity, yet Kerry Knight and Tony Gapes were quite happy to part with the sum.